Open ethnography
4.4K views | +0 today
Follow
Open ethnography
Materials for a debate on what a more 'open' ethnography might look like; collaborative, sensory, experimental, and more-than-human concerns for a Public Anthropology
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Tomás Sánchez Criado
Scoop.it!

The Battle for the Infrastructure of Everyday Life – But what was the question? – Medium

The object of design in the twenty-first century is the city itself. In the nineteenth century, it was the nation state, the factory and its engines, and the channels of globalised capitalism that began to emerge around that — clippers, canals, cables and contracts. In the twentieth century, the state and global markets became more complete versions of themselves, meaning politics and possessions were the order of the day. Art and design responded accordingly, often the willing handmaidens of these shifts.

Now, however, those late twentieth-century values, drifting towards individualism, have simply been stretched taut into the twenty-first, and the whole thing is ‘buffering’ as a result. Or at least has hit a punctuation point: a question mark or ellipsis in the form of events like Brexit, or a series of exclamation marks in the case of Trump (or perhaps the blast of random punctuation marks that used to denote swearwords in Asterix). The philosopher Jacques Attali, in A Brief History of the Future (2006), foresaw an end-point to this relentless drift towards the individual being the centre of things, noting the reductive movement, an endless shortening of the focal length, from religion to region to nation to person. He wrote of an erasure of nation states into a fully globalised market (‘hypercapitalism’), with two core industries: ‘insurance’ and ‘distraction’. It’s best to gloss over what follows — a planetary ‘hyperconflict’ — even if Attali ends on a broadly optimistic note of a world government as the only possible way of humanity finally addressing climate change (‘hyperdemocracy’). But in Western cultures, it feels as if we are already firmly located in our ‘distraction’ phase, whereas ‘insurance’ has perhaps manifested itself as a financialisation of most structures. Another key Attali prediction, a mass ‘nomadisation’ of migrants at both ends of the economic scale, is certainly with us, too. Attali’s blind spots are around the detail of how distraction or financialisation manifest themselves. Perhaps these technical details are always the hardest to get right — few could foresee the impact of the internet or the smartphone, hamstrung by our tendency to “look at the present through a rear-view mirror (as) we march backwards into the future”, as Marshall McLuhan had it. Attali was unable to truly comprehend the impact of computation on the way we do, well, almost everything; to perceive exactly how, as venture capitalist Marc Andreessen famously put it, that “software is eating the world”. Indeed, the effects of computation are often considered, rightly or wrongly, to be invisible, ephemeral; to be virtual rather than physical. No wonder we couldn’t see it coming. 

 Art is desperately playing catch-up, too. It either tries to capture and convey computational culture through drawing out software’s shadow, or by using its own tools against itself.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tomás Sánchez Criado
Scoop.it!

ethnoGRAPHIC: Extending Anthropology’s Reach, One Comic at a Time | Teaching Culture

ethnoGRAPHIC: Extending Anthropology’s Reach, One Comic at a Time | Teaching Culture | Open ethnography | Scoop.it
That series, now known as ethnoGRAPHIC (ethnography in graphic form), didn’t come out of nowhere. I had to first learn to love comics, which didn’t happen until comics took more of a literary turn. I wasn’t really drawn to superheroes (though I have learned to love them in recent years) as much as comics that offered stories about people in their everyday lives, but in the context of a larger set of stories, a culture if you will. Comics like Persepolis, Fun Home, Building Stories, and Essex County. As I delved more deeply into comics, anthropology was taking its own “arts” turn. In the years following the Writing Culture critique, anthropology turned towards more experimental forms of ethnographic method and representation—from poetry and fiction to creative non-fiction, as well as more visual forms like the films done by the Sensory Ethnography Lab at Harvard and Philippe Bourgeois’ Righteous Dopefiend, which combined photography with dialogue and analysis to bring the life of homeless heroin users to the attention of a broader public. What was happening in anthropology was an attempt to capture the complex nuances of what was going on in the field. It wasn’t about empirically deciphering patterns and principles, but what Michael D. Jackson described as “a fascination for the mysterious, emergent, and conflicted character of all human relationships.” It wasn’t a huge leap then to put these two developments together. The way comics lent itself to both narrative AND a kind of visceral relaying of the more affective elements of ethnographic research made for a good fit. Add to that the feedback I had gathered from instructors about students’ resistance to reading regular ethnographies (no matter how well written) and their desire for more visual material, and this all seemed like such a great idea I wondered why no one had thought of it! Turns out, I wasn’t a genius—there were a lot of people making this connection as well. Comics was making deep inroads into the academy in a variety of disciplines. But it was a conversation with Stacy Leigh Pigg in Vancouver well over five years ago, in which we talked about the specific potential of a collaboration between comics and ethnography, that helped me move from hunch to viable and testable hypothesis. After that conversation, I tested out the idea of ethnoGRAPHIC on many anthropologists. Over and over again, I met the same response: a kneejerk excitement, followed by skepticism, and ending with “it’s a great idea but it’ll never happen.” I knew the idea had real potential, but I was going to have to build it before people would sign on. The emerging Graphic Medicine community, as well as the role that Penn State University Press played in supporting it, was not only inspirational, it showed me that a university press could publish actual comics, not just monographs or collections about comics. Connecting with Nick Sousanis and hearing about the impending publication of his comic dissertation, Unflattening, by Harvard University Press, and consulting with local illustrator and comic artist Nick Craine, gave me the confidence to pitch the idea of ethnoGRAPHIC to my editorial board. So much scholarship had already been done by people like Hillary Chute and Bart Beatty among others, and by publishers like the University of Mississippi Press, that it wasn’t hard to sell comics as a serious endeavor. But it was harder to sell a series with academics actually working in the comics medium. With the help of Joshua Barker, an anthropologist at the University of Toronto who graciously agreed to act as Series Editor, and the support of my own publishing committee at the press, the series was formally approved in 2014. Now all I needed was a willing author and a book project! Lissa CoverIt wasn’t long before I came across Sherine Hamdy’s piece in a “Top of the Heap” column on the Somatosphere blog in which she mused whether a “graphic medical anthropology could bring medical anthropological and bioethical insights into more public engagement?” I phoned Sherine and the rest, as they say, is history. She had already written a fictional graphic novel script but was open to the idea of doing something that was more pedagogically oriented. We were both new to this, but there was such good will on both sides that I had a hunch it was going to work. By the time I met Sherine in person 6 months later, she had already talked with her co-author, Coleman Nye, about a project, found some early funding, and put out a call for artists at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD). Nearly three years after that initial phone call, Lissa: A Story about Medical Promise, Friendship, and Revolution will formally launch the ethnoGRAPHIC series. Whether it succeeds as a graphic novel and as an experimental ethnography will now be up to you to judge. But the sheer scope of the project is nothing less than inspirational. It’s a collaboration on numerous levels, experimental in form, and creative to the core. Much ink will be spilled about Lissa—including on this blog—in the coming weeks so I won’t add to that. Instead, I thought I would leave you with a few thoughts on what I see as the goals behind the series and its potential for injecting new energy into anthropology and ethnographic research.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tomás Sánchez Criado
Scoop.it!

Explaining Ethnography in the Field: A Conversation between Pasang Yangjee Sherpa and Carole McGranahan

Explaining Ethnography in the Field: A Conversation between Pasang Yangjee Sherpa and Carole McGranahan | Open ethnography | Scoop.it

What is ethnography? In anthropology, ethnography is both something to know and a way of knowing. It is an orientation or epistemology, a type of writing, and also a methodology. As a method, ethnography is an embodied, empirical, and experiential field-based way of knowing centered around participant-observation. This is obvious to anthropologists as it has been our central method for the last century. However, what ethnography is, how it works, and the unique specificity of ethnographic data is not always clear to outsiders, whether they are other researchers, officials, or members of the communities with whom we are working. Why is this, and how do we explain ethnography and its value when we are in the field? In April, we started a conversation about this in person at a conference at Cornell University, emailed back and forth over the summer, and concluded the conversation this month at a conference at the University of Colorado. We cover topics including the context of research, questions of technology, IRBs, being a native anthropologist, the usefulness of ethnography and stories, and ethnographic research as a unique sort of data.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tomás Sánchez Criado
Scoop.it!

With an “urban diary,” everyone’s a city planner

With an “urban diary,” everyone’s a city planner | Open ethnography | Scoop.it
[…] in my book, Seeing the Better City, I offer a tool – the “urban diary” – that can harness the power of perception to transform how our cities evolve. An urban diary is more than either abstract idealism or the “citizen participation” of old. It takes advantage of what many of us are already doing with our cameras and smartphones: recording what we see, and what we like or dislike, about the cities we inhabit. Indeed, many of us are regularly creating urban diaries, of a sort, on our Facebook and Instagram feeds. We can take it a step further, by intentionally observing and documenting our experience with photographs, sketches, or notes – and utilising what I call the LENS method (Look, Explore, Narrate, and Summarise.) It’s easy to start. For example, visit your five favorite neighborhoods and record the sights and sounds you encounter. Or write a couple of paragraphs about your morning commute. The information collected in an urban diary can be used in multiple ways – as a scalable tool to become more mindful of our surroundings, for example, and hence better advocates for thoughtful urban planning. Or it can be used to enhance traditional land-use or design-review processes, which now typically rely on conventional oral comment or written input from affected neighbors
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tomás Sánchez Criado
Scoop.it!

Alien y los gabinetes de maravillas (o la fina línea entre historia de la ciencia y ciencia ficción o aquello humano y aquello no humano).

Alien y los gabinetes de maravillas (o la fina línea entre historia de la ciencia y ciencia ficción o aquello humano y aquello no humano). | Open ethnography | Scoop.it

A priori puede parecer una locura escribir sobre la última película de Alien en un blog sobre culturas urbanas y patrimonio científico, pero después de no poder borrar de mi mente en varios días las imágenes del “gabinete de maravillas” del film, me he visto en la obligación de escribirlo.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tomás Sánchez Criado
Scoop.it!

Anarco: Gráfica y movimientos sociales. Ilustradores en debate.

Charla del Tenderete 14 en el teatro El Musical (Viernes 16 de junio del '17) http://tenderetefestival.tumblr.com/ http://anarcoartllibertari.org
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tomás Sánchez Criado
Scoop.it!

OOZ; Natalie Jeremijenko

OOZ; Natalie Jeremijenko | Open ethnography | Scoop.it
This is our follow-up Zoo Posting; the Zoo de Vincennes project raised a few issues that we thought needed further discussion and so we bring to you Natalie Jeremijenko. We came across Natalie’s work at the Systems of Sustainability lecture series hosted by the University of Houston this last summer (the same series where we found Fritz Haeg). Natalie’s been developing a body of work centering on issues relating to animals, robots and ecology and teetering on the edge of humanism. The work is experimental, process intensive, complex, and we feel is necessary to consider within the frame-work of Animal Architecture.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tomás Sánchez Criado
Scoop.it!

Anthropological publics, public anthropology | Bangstad | HAU: Journal of Ethnographic Theory

Anthropological publics, public anthropology
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tomás Sánchez Criado
Scoop.it!

Soportes visuales en torno al mapeo colectivo - Iconoclasistas

Soportes visuales en torno al mapeo colectivo - Iconoclasistas | Open ethnography | Scoop.it
Estos son algunos de los dispositivos que utilizamos para compendiar los  procesos de mapeo disponiblizándolos para ser activados por otros y otras. Estos soportes han sido experimentados en diversas oportunidades, forman parte de nuestra caja de herramientas y muestran las posibilidades inventivas que se abren a partir de una instancia de investigación colaborativa. Constituyen objetos para la activació
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tomás Sánchez Criado
Scoop.it!

Boundary gazpacho: Daniel Fernández Pascual at TEDxMadrid

What do urbanism and food have in common? The Boundary Gazpacho (Gazpacho de Límites) provides an edible map of strategies to add speculative value to land
Tomás Sánchez Criado's insight:
Hoy he estado recordando el "gazpacho de los límites" de Daniel Fernández Pascual, re-pensando sobre recetas y modos de visualización, tutoriales y productos de documentación de investigaciones sobre lo urbano…

 Me encanta cómo es el proceso de ir sacando elementos–donde los alimentos se convierten en metáfora y metonimia de una explicación sobre procesos urbanos, parte de un proceso de narración sobre el boom inmobiliario y la especulación urbanística (algo con raíces mucho más amplias y largas que la reciente crisis) o las definiciones de suelo– antes de juntarlos y no el producto final lo que se hace visible, siendo el producto sólo un cierre (siendo el "gazpacho", no creo que casualmente, un epíteto que suele emplearse como metáfora de lío o de desorden, al igual que "tomate", con lo que empieza, nos habla del marrón o el tema)
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tomás Sánchez Criado
Scoop.it!

Marcus Coates l Unconscious reasoning l Meaning 2015

Marcus Coates is a London-based artist best known for his shamanic performances evoking animal spirits. At Meaning 2015 he invited us to place greater value in our subconscious mind and to use its power to solve the problems we face. The Meaning conference is an annual gathering for people who believe business can and must be better in the 21st century. It happens in Brighton every November and brings together an audience of 300 passionate people who want to change the world.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tomás Sánchez Criado
Scoop.it!

French Artist Trying to Hatch Eggs Will Likely Kill Them All, Expert Says

French Artist Trying to Hatch Eggs Will Likely Kill Them All, Expert Says | Open ethnography | Scoop.it
A French artist who is trying to hatch eggs with his body heat as part of an art installation will likely kill the chickens, experts said.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tomás Sánchez Criado
Scoop.it!

Eight lessons from building card decks for diversity and inclusivity

“What do the Table of Elements, the first IBM computer, and the novel ‘Lolita’ have in common?” This question was posed as the teaser for the “Designing with Card Decks” class offered by Stanford…
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tomás Sánchez Criado
Scoop.it!

Todo lo que siempre quisiste saber sobre tecnologías blandas -

Todo lo que siempre quisiste saber sobre tecnologías blandas - | Open ethnography | Scoop.it

Unas tecnologías nos permiten transformar los materiales y nos proveen de recursos, productos e infraestructuras. Otras nos permiten transformar las relaciones entre personas y entre entornos, a través de dispositivos relacionales de carácter comportamental, comunicacional y organizacional. Necesitamos conocer mejor las segundas para recombinarlas con las primeras y ponerlas en juego desde la acción en lo concreto. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tomás Sánchez Criado
Scoop.it!

Estación Ciudad | CCCB

Estación Ciudad | CCCB | Open ethnography | Scoop.it

La Estación Ciudad parte del marco conceptual propuesto por la ingeniera y artista Natalie Jeremijenko y se convierte en la sede de la Clínica de Salud Ambiental en el espacio público de la ciudad de Barcelona. Con base en el Distrito de Sant Martí, la Estación consiste en una serie de infraestructuras para la realización de acciones participativas en las que la ciudadanía contribuye activamente a la mejora de la salud ambiental.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tomás Sánchez Criado
Scoop.it!

Un anarchivo... | El Estado Mental

Un anarchivo... | El Estado Mental | Open ethnography | Scoop.it

La exposición Anarchivo sida es fruto de un proceso de investigación y producción del colectivo Equipo re (Aimar Arriola, Nancy Garín y Linda Valdés). Toma como punto de partida la producción cultural en torno a la crisis del sida en el sur de Europa y América Latina. El proyecto aborda el VIH/sida no sólo como una epidemia médica, sino como un cambio de paradigma visual, afectivo y económico en plena convivencia con la consolidación de las políticas neoliberales y del proceso de globalización. 

Tomás Sánchez Criado's insight:
"Un archivo trata generalmente y entre otras cosas sobre la producción de verdad. Los archivos existen. Son múltiples, generalmente son además grandes instituciones, es decir que instituyen sobre nuestras vidas. El Estado es un gran archivo, por ejemplo. El Anarchivo es un archivo anárquico por definición, un archivo que está estallado, un archivo que está hecho de retazos, un archivo queer, de lo raro, un archivo de la vergüenza, del armario, de la exposición, del contagio, de la transmisión humano-humano, un archivo anal también, un archivo no sólo inscripto en las políticas de la lengua o el lenguaje articulado, un archivo animal, un archivo de las diferentes formas del duelo, un archivo sobre cómo la sangre, el semen y la piel, los órganos soberanos disciplinares han determinado las políticas y las resistencias identitarias hegemónicas y disidentes occidentales. Y cómo adquieren particulares características a partir de la crisis del sida."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tomás Sánchez Criado
Scoop.it!

HACÍA UN RUIDO. Frases para un film político. Film proyecto borrador. Texto y Plaquette (El Ranchito, Madrid, 2014)

HACÍA UN RUIDO. Frases para un film político. Film proyecto borrador. Texto y Plaquette (El Ranchito, Madrid, 2014) | Open ethnography | Scoop.it
Display en Nave 16 (Rafa Prada) Expo final de El Ranchito Texto escrito y editado en las 6 semanas de residencia
Tomás Sánchez Criado's insight:
"la poesía no documenta ni relata sino que ofrece una resistencia a ese presente con forma tal vez ¿de tempo más largo?"
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tomás Sánchez Criado
Scoop.it!

Under-the-Radar Publications | CCCB LAB

Under-the-Radar Publications | CCCB LAB | Open ethnography | Scoop.it
Between a collection, an archive and a reference area, La Fanzinoteca is inspired by the spirit of amateurism and by a passion for fanzines and micropublishing.
Tomás Sánchez Criado's insight:
“as with Fanzines themselves, specific solutions are bound to be found for each case. For example, we were surprised to learn that Kit Hammonds claims to lose 5-10% of his collection whenever he exhibits it, but at the same time he receives donations that make it 20% bigger. This makes it a very interesting model for the growth and renewal of a collection.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tomás Sánchez Criado
Scoop.it!

Celuloide y autosuficiencia: laboratorios autogestionados por artistas | CCCB LAB

Celuloide y autosuficiencia: laboratorios autogestionados por artistas | CCCB LAB | Open ethnography | Scoop.it
Ante la desaparición del entramado industrial del celuloide aparece el ingenio y la unión que hace la fuerza, el DIY fílmico resiste y toma el mundo.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tomás Sánchez Criado
Scoop.it!

Iconoclasistas: la práctica del mapeo colectivo

Iconoclasistas: la práctica del mapeo colectivo | Open ethnography | Scoop.it
El dúo de Iconoclasistas, conformado por Julia Risler y Pablo Ares, elabora propuestas que combinan el mapeo colectivo, la investigació
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tomás Sánchez Criado
Scoop.it!

Mossy Virtual Reality Helmets Let You See the Forest as Animals Do

Mossy Virtual Reality Helmets Let You See the Forest as Animals Do | Open ethnography | Scoop.it
Compared to certain animals, humans have pretty limited vision.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tomás Sánchez Criado
Scoop.it!

The Trip - Marcus Coates

The Trip - Marcus Coates | Open ethnography | Scoop.it

In his newly commissioned work for the Serpentine Gallery, The Trip, Coates reflects on the intimate conversations he had with patients at St. John's Hospice in London. Exploring the possibilities for dialogue between artists and those facing the end of life, Coates asked patients the question: 'What can I do for you?' The Trip documents exchanges between Coates and the late Alex H., who requested that the artist visit a remote small community in the Amazon on his behalf. Marcus Coates creates rituals and mythologies that examine the role of the imagination and its possibilities for unconscious reasoning, often questioning the relationship between critical rationalism and belief. He seeks to test the pragmatic and uniquely useful potential of the artist within contemporary society. In his newly commissioned work for the Serpentine Gallery, The Trip, Coates reflects on the intimate conversations he had with patients at St. John's Hospice in London. Exploring the possibilities for dialogue between artists and those facing the end of life, Coates asked patients the question: 'What can I do for you?' The Trip documents exchanges between Coates and the late Alex H., who requested that the artist visit a remote small community in the Amazon on his behalf.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tomás Sánchez Criado
Scoop.it!

Fabrica Talking Point: Marcus Coates - Dawn Chorus

Fabrica, Brighton's Centre for Contemporary Art is pleased to be showing Dawn Chorus by Marcus Coates in partnership with Brighton Festival. This film features an interview with Marcus in which he talks about his relationship to birdsong, the digital processes behind Dawn Chorus and the relationship between the work and the space at Fabrica. This film was made by Laurence Hill, Ben Harding and Tom Thistlethwaite.

more...
No comment yet.