Virtual Patients, VR, Online Sims and Serious Games for Education and Care
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Virtual Patients, VR, Online Sims and Serious Games for Education and Care
Web based information reflecting VP's, online simulations and serious games in the field of health care education.
Curated by Nigel Wynne
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Military Training Happens Virtually in Florida

Military Training Happens Virtually in Florida | Virtual Patients, VR, Online Sims and Serious Games for Education and Care | Scoop.it
(NewsUSA) - Sponsored News - Florida is no stranger to the entertainment industry. After all, it's home to the most visited theme parks on Earth. What people may not know is that the Sunshine State's entertainment expertise is also used to train our nation's military.
Nigel Wynne's insight:
Wow, 1000 acre site brings together industry and US military state of the art sim technology!
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Practice makes perfect for Brooklyn surgeons using high-tech simulators to save lives

Practice makes perfect for Brooklyn surgeons using high-tech simulators to save lives | Virtual Patients, VR, Online Sims and Serious Games for Education and Care | Scoop.it
Death seemed preferable to surgery when Aleksandra Gelfand learned she had a bulging aneurysm. “I say, ‘Never,’” Gelfand told the News. “I live 75 years. That's it."
Alex Wade's insight:

'Simulation technology is one of the new frontiers of the medical industry'.  This article demonstrates that computer based simulations are gaining traction in the mainstream, not only with the source of the article (New York Daily News), but also the content.  This piece includes anecdotal evidence from the patient involved in the procedure, who while seemingly nonplussed by the event, can still see that simulation, in the context of healthcare as well as other areas, does indeed save lives.

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ImREAL project

The ImREAL project aims to close the gap between the 'real-world' and the 'virtual-world' by developing a simulated learning environment that focuses on simu...
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Perfusing a Cadaver for Skills Training

General surgery and neurosurgery residents usually sharpen their skills on partial cadavers. This time, however, surgical residents operated on a full-bod
Nigel Wynne's insight:
Video from @jumpsimulation describing the animation of cadavers with pulsatile artificial blood to more effectively prepare trainee surgeons. The narrative describes the limitations of mannequin and VR based approaches to sim learning whilst acknowledging they still play an important role in education, but a role that will have maximum impact if aligned together with animated cadaver based learning. Depending on how squeamish you are this is an interesting example of sim based learning that's worth a look and not something I've heard of before - (actually video has been tastefully shot - so not too bad).
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Medical training in hyperreality > U.S. Air Force > Article Display

Medical training in hyperreality > U.S. Air Force > Article Display | Virtual Patients, VR, Online Sims and Serious Games for Education and Care | Scoop.it
The Air Force Medical Modeling and Simulation Training, or AFMMAST, is improving medical training is by adding hyperreality and high fidelity through the use of the Tactical Combat Casualty Care Cut Suit.,
Alex Wade's insight:

As this page documents, online and digital simulations continue to gain traction across all areas of healthcare and learning.  The underpinning philosophy of our work at Birmingham City University is the proclivity of simulations to iterate and scaffold.  From the lowest point of pen and paper simulations, to virtual patients, scaling across fidelities is vital to the training of the student.


This development from the US Air Force then, appears to be the next level in medical simulator technology.  Simulations can prepare us to execute our training, but it cannot prepare is for the sheer tactility of liquids, smells and tastes. The 'cut suit' appears to address these inadequacies and, in doing so prepares surgeons, nurses and healthcare professionals for the unpredictability and humanity they will face in operating rooms, casualty departments and wards the world over.

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