Online identity
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Rescooped by Josie Eldred from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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The Psychology of Video Game Avatars

The Psychology of Video Game Avatars | Online identity | Scoop.it

When each of us gets up in the morning, we start messing with what might as well be avatar customization tools to change our appearance. We decide what clothes and jewelry to wear, and we decide which hairs to shave and which hairs to style. Some of us occasionally make more radical alterations, such as getting tattoos, piercing various dangly bits with metal, or even going in for cosmetic surgery. In real life, though, we’re often limited in the changes we can make to appear taller, say, or more prosperous. Videogames and virtual realities, on the other hand, are more flexible.


Via The Learning Factor
Josie Eldred's insight:

1. I've ranked this link at the top of the list because it's one of the very few I found while curating my resources that really touched on the exact point I'm trying to make in my online identity project. It alludes to the fact that people have been proven to create online avatars that are based off their actual identities, but are often idealised or improved. It goes on to say that we tend to use avatars to compensate for what we perceive to be flaws and that we may even start to reflect our online avatars. Because the author of the article, Jamie Madigan, has studied psychology (specifically video game psychology) and appears to be highly respected in the video game community, I trust his word to hold a lot of value.

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The Learning Factor's curator insight, November 30, 2013 4:36 AM

Are you more dominant, kind, assertive, clever, or flirty depending on how your character appears in-game? Both new and old research has shown that the avatars we adopt can influence our behaviours.

BOUTELOUP Jean-Paul's curator insight, December 2, 2013 3:44 AM

A l'heure ou le serious game tente de s'imposer dans les processus de recrutement....

luiy's curator insight, December 2, 2013 7:41 AM

“Studies have shown that, in general, people create slightly idealized avatars based on their actual selves,” says Nick Yee, who used to work as a research scientist at the Palo Alto Research Center but who now works at Ubisoft. He should know: before joining Ubisoft Yee has spent years studying the effects of avatars on human behavior in settings such as Second Life and World Of Warcraft. “But a compensation effect has been observed. People with a higher body mass index – likely overweight or obese – create more physically idealized avatars, [which are] taller or thinner. And people who are depressed or have low self-esteem create avatars with more idealized traits, [such as being] more gregarious and conscientious.”

 

Other researchers have found that the ability to create idealized versions of ourselves is strongly connected to how much we enjoy the game, how immersed we become, and how much we identify with the avatar. Assistant professor Seung-A ‘Annie’ Jin, who works at Emerson College’s Marketing Communication Department, did a series of experiments with Nintendo Miis and Wii Fit.1 She found that players who were able to create a Mii that was approximately their ideal body shape generally felt more connected to that avatar and also felt more capable of changing their virtual self’s behavior – a fancy way of saying that the game felt more interactive and immersive. This link was strongest, in fact, when there was a big discrepancy between participants’ perceptions of their ideal and actual selves.

Rescooped by Josie Eldred from leapmind
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Web 're-defining' human identities

Web 're-defining' human identities | Online identity | Scoop.it
Social networks such as Facebook and on-line gaming are changing people's view of who they are and their place in the world, says a UK report.

Via LeapMind
Josie Eldred's insight:

3. Despite that this article digresses somewhat, it nonetheless touches very accurately on the topic of my presentation. The article states, "The study found that far from creating superficial or fantasy identities that some critics suggest, in many cases it allowed people to escape the preconceptions of those immediately around them and find their "true" identity. This is especially true of disabled people who told researchers that online gaming enabled them to socialise on an equal footing with others." (Ghosh, P., 2013) It also quotes, "'The internet can allow many people to realise their identities more fully.'" (Ghosh, P., 2013) I feel that these two lines encapsulate the theme of my presentation very precisely, and I also find the BBC News to be a reliable source of information, which is why I've prioritised this article on the list.

 

 

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Rescooped by Josie Eldred from Transmedia: Storytelling for the Digital Age
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Why should I reveal my 'real identity' online? Anonymity isn't so terrible

Why should I reveal my 'real identity' online? Anonymity isn't so terrible | Online identity | Scoop.it

Via The Digital Rocking Chair
Josie Eldred's insight:

4. This article discusses the benefits of having multiple online identities and why that's not such a bad thing. It talks about the value of being able to have separate identities for different websites and why that's beneficial. I think this link is particularly relevant and interesting because, in contrast to other resources I found while curating, it makes the point that having a range of identities isn't harmful or 'bad', and that humans have utilised multiple identities since we started living in large and separated communities. I respect The Guardian as a trustworthy news source and find their 'Comment is free' section to be a hub of insightful and interesting discussions which is why I've included this resource.

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Amethyst Mayer's curator insight, December 27, 2014 3:39 AM

This is another article that talks about the issue of Online anonymity, taking more of the insight that people are able to "display the less appealing parts of their nature." by being anonymous online.

Kate Isabelle Fincher's curator insight, December 28, 2014 1:03 AM

6# great look on the context of anonymity and why we enjoy it so

Erica Laing's curator insight, December 29, 2014 1:03 AM

Interesting thoughts on multiple online accounts and why we should we have profiles online.

Rescooped by Josie Eldred from Digital Delights - Avatars, Virtual Worlds, Gamification
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Reinventing Ourselves - Exploring Identity, Roles & Development in Virtual Worlds

Reinventing Ourselves - Exploring Identity, Roles & Development  in Virtual Worlds | Online identity | Scoop.it
The proposed book explores the theme of identity, specifically as applied to its role and development in virtual worlds.

...


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Josie Eldred's insight:

5. This resource is incredibly long and not always relevant, but it does go into a lot of detail surrounding online identity and our behaviour online, moreso than any of my other resources. One particular line from the book stood out to me as being both relevant and important: “Ultimately, digital bodies tell the world something about yourself. They are a public signal of who you are. They also shape and make real how users internally experiences their selves.” (Childs, M., 2011) I've included and prioritised this resource because the depth and breadth of the research undertaken in the creation of this book suggests to me that the authors are very knowledgable on the topic of online identity. It goes into a great amount of detail and discusses a wide range of topics surrounding online identity, offering the knowledge of over a dozen authors.

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Rescooped by Josie Eldred from Digital Delights
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Learning with 'e's: Multiple identities

Learning with 'e's: Multiple identities | Online identity | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Josie Eldred's insight:

11. I've included this post in my list because I think its discussion of multiple identities is fascinating and because it asks a lot of interesting questions, e.g: "Does my identity change when I am on Facebook? Do I modify my speech or the way I present myself when I'm speaking on the telephone, or on Instant Messaging, or Skype, or a webcam link? When I post up a blog, how different is that style of writing to the style I would use in say, an e-mail? Or a collaborative environment such as a wiki? And does my Second Life avatar bear any resemblance to my real life persona at all?" (Wheeler, S., 2010) The post challenges its readers to question why they create multiple identities or personas which I think is important. Despite that this is an informal blog post, its author, Steve Wheeler, is an associate professor of Information & Computer Technology at Plymouth University which I feel affords his opinions a somewhat high place in this list.

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Henry's Story- Creating Online Identities Video | Common Sense Media

Henry's Story- Creating Online Identities Video | Common Sense Media | Online identity | Scoop.it
Watch Common Sense Media's Henry's Story- Creating Online Identities video to help you make informed decisions.
Josie Eldred's insight:

9. I particularly like this resource because I think it makes an excellent point in saying that the Internet not only allows us to form different or multiple identities, but to be treated and perceived differently and to be taken more seriously or given more credit. In being able to create online personas we're given the opportunity to be heard by an audience that might otherwise dismiss us at face value. I think the source of the video, Common Media, has a good sense of ethics and a noble goal and I feel that its content is worth viewing.

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Rescooped by Josie Eldred from Content, marketing and the meaning of it all
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Do your online activities define you?

Do your online activities define you? | Online identity | Scoop.it
Open thread: The internet is changing the very nature of identity, says a new study – so then, Cif-ers, tell us how you define yourselves

Via SarahMacCann
Josie Eldred's insight:

12. This article is extremely short but I think it's a valuable resource because it puts forward the notion that some of us have only been able to explore our identities through the development of the Internet, and suggests that the Web allows us to be a range of different things - that we don't have to confine ourselves to one specific box - "Are you a Redditor, as well as a carer? A Cif-er as much as you're a doctor? A World of Warcraft druid who does a spot of teaching during the day?" (The Guardian, 2013) I don't think this resource is necessarily authoritative because it's simply an open thread on The Guardian, but I do think it raises some very worthwhile points that are relevant to the topic of my presentation.

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Rescooped by Josie Eldred from Digital Delights - Avatars, Virtual Worlds, Gamification
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TEDxWinnipeg - Jim Blascovich - Digital Freedom: Virtual Reality, Avatars, and Multiple Identities

Jim Blascovich, Ph.D., University of California at Santa Barbara If Our Brains Can't Distinguish between the Virtual World and the Real World, How Do We Know...

...


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Josie Eldred's insight:

13. This video is long and covers the topic of multiple identities quite broadly, but there are a few quotes in it that I think are very relevant to my presentation. This one in particular stood out to me: "Digital worlds, including chat rooms, massive multiplayer online games, unstructured social platforms such as Second Life and 3D immersive virtual reality - think Kinect but on steroids - have opened doors to perceptions and self presentations that have never been opened before." (Blascovich, J., 2011) I think the points that Jim Blascovich puts forward about the ability to be able to experiment with self presentation and exploration through online technologies are worth noting. Given that Mr Blascovich is a psychologist specialising in social influence within technologically mediated environment (amongst other things) and that he's done extensive research on the topic of online identity, I trust his authority.

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Rescooped by Josie Eldred from Defining New Media
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4chan founder: Mark Zuckerberg is “totally wrong” about online identity | VentureBeat

4chan founder: Mark Zuckerberg is “totally wrong” about online identity | VentureBeat | Online identity | Scoop.it

Anthony is a senior editor at VentureBeat, as well as its reporter on media, advertising, and social networks. Before joining ...


Via Scott Scanlon
Josie Eldred's insight:

18. I've included this link, albeit near the bottom of my resources list due to its slightly repetitive nature, because I think it raises some good points about the anonymity the Internet grants us and how that allows us to explore our identities. This link elaborates on the points made in the tenth entry of this list, pointing out that, "... anonymity allows users to reveal themselves in a 'completely unvarnished, unfiltered, raw way.' One of the things that’s lost when you carry the same identity everywhere is 'the innocence of youth.'" (Ha, A., 2011) Because VentureBeat has been established online for the past 8 years and hosts a team of experienced journalists, I feel that it's a good source of news relating to technology and digital media.

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Rescooped by Josie Eldred from Digital Delights
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Negotiating multiple identities on the social web: Goffman, fragmentation and the multiverse

Negotiating multiple identities on the social web: Goffman, fragmentation and the multiverse | Online identity | Scoop.it
(This is a keynote presentation I delivered at this year’s webCom Montréal) Let me start off with a confession: I have multiple personas. No, not multiple personalities! I have multiple personas. And I’m pretty sure you do too! Erwin Goffman, the

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Josie Eldred's insight:

17. This article is very long and complex in spots, but it does talk a lot about fragmented identities and how the web forces us to analyse how we choose to present ourselves and why. While discussing the problems that arise with existing on multiple online platforms, Ms Weisgerber highlights one of the points I'm trying to make about the different personas we have depending on our online environment: "... Facebook Corinne and Twitter Corinne are not the same persona. And they’re also slightly different from Corinne, the blogger." (Weisgerber, C., 2011) Given that Corinne Weisgerber is an associate professor of Communication at St. Edward's University I feel that her thoughts are worth including here.

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Second Self - Cyborg Anthropology

Josie Eldred's insight:

21. This article is short and not entirely accurate to my topic, but I like the notion it puts forward that our online selves are an extension of our offline selves. It also touches on the idea that the Internet grants us the opportunity to create a persona or identity. The website on which the article appears contains a lot of information about the presentation and exploration of oneself online which is why I've included it on this list.

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Rescooped by Josie Eldred from Tech Ethics
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Exploring Digital Identity: Beyond the Private Public Paradox

Exploring Digital Identity: Beyond the Private Public Paradox | Online identity | Scoop.it
Exploring Digital Identity: Beyond the Private Public Paradox

Via David Ryan Polgar
Josie Eldred's insight:

2. This reading is quite long, but I feel the first chapter makes some excellent points about the purpose of online identities and how we employ them. This line in particular is very relevant to my presentation: "An individual can use an online identity to act as an extension of their offline identity, or they can use an online identity to mask and alter their offline identity and become someone or something else." (Koosel, S., 2012) The succeeding paragraphs (pp. 155-157) also continue to elaborate on that theme and make some great points about our need to be part of a community and our ability to assume new identities or adapt ourselves according to the company we're in. Because the book to which this chapter belongs has been published by both Peter Lang and academia.edu I believe it holds merit.

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Rescooped by Josie Eldred from teaching with technology
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Guest Post | Who Are You Online? Considering Issues of Web Identity

Guest Post | Who Are You Online? Considering Issues of Web Identity | Online identity | Scoop.it
In this post we celebrate Digital Learning Day by exploring issues around online identity and expression, with help from both Common Sense Media resources and materials from The New York Times and The Learning Network.

Via Louise Robinson-Lay
Josie Eldred's insight:

6. I've chosen to place this article quite high up on the list because it asks a lot of interesting and insightful questions, as well as referencing a plethora of other relevant articles. I especially like that it discusses who we decide to be when we're on the Web and the mental process we go through when participating online. It raises the point that, unlike in 'real life', we get to choose who we would like to be online, and we're able to edit and manipulate ourselves. I think this is worth noting because it highlights the importance of the Internet in being able to shape and form identities and how we go about doing that. Because this article is posted by The New York Times and because it contains so many good resources I feel happy to include it in this list.

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Louise Robinson-Lay's curator insight, March 16, 2013 1:27 AM

Your digital identity should be very carefully created and managed. This post gives teachers several resources that help them to teach these important skills.

Jeff VanArnhem's curator insight, March 16, 2013 8:54 AM

Students need to be more conscious of the digital footprint they are leaving behind.

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Multiple Online Identities

Multiple Online Identities | Online identity | Scoop.it
Josie Eldred's insight:

7. I've prioritised this article quite highly because it acknowledges not only the necessity of multiple identities, especially online, but also the fluid nature of identity in general. It points out that even within MMOs like World of Warcraft a user can create several different characters with different appearances and personalities and that this facilitates the changeable and flexible nature of humans. It also highlights the fact that different identities are often needed for different contexts. I particularly liked this quote from the article: "Rather than creating a single identity and a single sign-in for all of one's Internet use, I think we need to go the other way.  We need to accept that identity is fluid, that multiple identities have usefulness, and that there is no single 'me' to map." (Antunes, A., 2009) Given that Alexander "Sandy" Antunes has been published in numerous journal articles, as well as being an RPG designer, I'm confident that his thoughts on the topic of online identity are worth listening to.

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Rescooped by Josie Eldred from Online identity
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http://www.internetsociety.org/sites/default/files/Online Identity-An Overview.pdf


Via Amanda Swanson
Josie Eldred's insight:

8. Despite that this presentation is somewhat simple I think it does a fantastic job of clearly illustrating and outling online identity which makes it an excellent resource in terms of understanding what an identity and its fragments are. I believe the presentation's source, the Internet Society, is a very ethical, trustworthy and reliable organisation whose authority on all matters of digital society and the Internet is worth noting.

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Amanda Swanson's curator insight, August 17, 2014 11:27 PM

#12 - Great overivew of what your online identity is and what information is captured about you.

Rescooped by Josie Eldred from Online Identity, Safety and Security
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Online identity: is authenticity or anonymity more important?

Online identity: is authenticity or anonymity more important? | Online identity | Scoop.it
Facebook and Google want to link online and offline personas, while 4Chan and other social sites prefer people to play with the freedom of pseudonyms

Via Living and Working on the Web
Josie Eldred's insight:

10. While this article isn't entirely relevant to my presentation's topic, it does explore the idea of online anonymity and the use of said anonymity to be able to explore one's identity. The article quotes, "The ability to be anonymous is increasingly important because it gives people control, it lets them be creative, it lets them figure out their identity and explore what they want to do ..." (Krotoski, A., 2012) which I think is important in understanding why we often choose to be anonymous online and why anonymity can in fact empower us to explore our identities. Because the article focuses a lot on the thoughts of Christopher Poole, creator of 4Chan, and Andrew Lewman, director of the Tor Project - people who both have a lot of experience in the field of digital media and life online - I feel their thoughts on this topic carry a lot of weight.

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Open education and digital identities | catherinecronin

Open education and digital identities | catherinecronin | Online identity | Scoop.it
I'll be exploring how educators and students in higher education construct and negotiate their identities — social, pedagogical, civic, professional — in open online spaces in which they interact. Some of the questions I am ...
Josie Eldred's insight:

15. I've included this resource fairly low down on the list because it's an informal blog post rather than a published article and also mostly discusses online identity in relation to open education, but I nonetheless feel that it contains some great sentiments. Two that stood out to me were: "But identity is not a single construct; we have multiple identities related to our different roles and contexts (e.g. daughter, mother, partner, friend, student, lecturer). This is the case for both digital and embodied identities ..." (Cronin, C., 2014) and, "In open online spaces, students and educators are not limited by real-name identities, nor by rigid role definitions. Students, particularly, may experiment with new identities – not just social identities, with which they may have some confidence, but learner identities and public/civic identities." (Cronin, C., 2014) Given that the author of this blog, Catherine Cronin, is a lecturer at the National University of Ireland, focusing specifically on online and open education, digital identity, and social media in education, I feel that her authority on the topic of online identity is worth acknowledging and including.

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Rescooped by Josie Eldred from Science News
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Avatars Become Fused With Your Physical Self

Avatars Become Fused With Your Physical Self | Online identity | Scoop.it

Just how real is virtual reality? A recent study on avatars in a virtual environment shows the extent that our physical selves can be fused with customized versions.

When gamers create personalized representations of themselves, the challenges and joy that their avatars encounter can have real physical and emotional effects. To find out just how important that customization factor is, communications researchers did a study with 121 college-aged participants.


Via Sakis Koukouvis
Josie Eldred's insight:

14. This article doesn't specifically discuss online identity but it does examine our relationship with and attachment to the avatars we create online and how they reflect and influence us. I think this is important because it alludes to the idea that our avatars are generally a representation of us or who we'd like to be and talks about how we relate to them. I trust the opinions reflected in the article because it references several sources, as well as having been posted on a reputable site.

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Introducing Your Hyperconnected Online-Offline Identity

Introducing Your Hyperconnected Online-Offline Identity | Online identity | Scoop.it
Yesterday we wrote about the positive and negative consequences of living a hyperconnected life.

Via Carlos Rodriguez-Gutierrez
Josie Eldred's insight:

16. I've included this link in the list because, although it goes more in depth surrounding the consequences of one's actions online, it nonetheless acknowledges the issue of fractured identities and how we present and perceive ourselves - "In our real lives, we constantly struggle between who we think we are, what others think we are and what people think we think we are. The real self is saddled somewhere in the overlap between these three circles. These ideas of the self apply in both an online and offline context." (Eler, A., 2012) The article's author, Alicia Eler, has been published in multiple arenas and has authored a wide range of articles concerning online issues, hence the article's inclusion in this list.

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# Is that really you? - Hindustan Times

# Is that really you? - Hindustan Times | Online identity | Scoop.it
A diva on Facebook and a bore in real life? Ever wondered why? Nidhi Thakur writes about online identity vs offline identity
Josie Eldred's insight:

20. This article jumps around a bit and fails to make its point clear at times but regardless I think it raises a lot of good points about how the freedom or unimpeded nature of the Internet allows us to say and do things we wouldn't otherwise have the chance or confidence to do. The author of the article puts forward the idea that our online presence grants us the ability to be less inhibited and more confident and in doing so, makes us more empowered in 'real life'. As far as I can tell this article was the author's first published piece of writing, hence its position at the bottom of my resources list, but given that it was published by the Hindustan Times and that the author is clearly interested in pursuing the topic of online identity I think it's worth including on this list.

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Putting Your Best Faces Forward

Putting Your Best Faces Forward | Online identity | Scoop.it
With varying policies on identifying yourself, Web sites struggle to balance creativity with accountability.
Josie Eldred's insight:

19. This article in its entirety isn't hugely relevant to my presentation topic, but it does include one quote that I think paints a fantastic picture of why multiple identities are both healthy and important and possibly even essential (within reason): "Identity is provisional. Who we are is whom we choose to be at any given moment, depending on personality, whim, temperament, or subjective need. No other person or organization can abridge that right, as shape-shifting is inherent to human consciousness, and allows us to thrive and survive under greatly differing circumstances by becoming different people as need or desire arises. By assuming the mantle of the Other, it allows us, paradoxically, to complete ourselves. Every day is Halloween." (Angwin, J., 2009) I think the opening Walt Whitman quote in the article is also very apt.

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