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Teaching & Learning MOOC Report: January 2014

Teaching & Learning MOOC Report: January 2014 | Online and Digital learning | Scoop.it

"The Teaching & Learning MOOC report is a monthly curation of the best upcoming eLearning content for teachers and students, maintained by TeachThought and Class Central. The report will be published the first week of every month for content beginning the proceeding month."


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MOOC Roundtable: The past, present and future of the platform

We're just coming off a summer where it seemed like you couldn't go a week without seeing massive open online courses in the headlines. We've assembled an ex...

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What Teachers Need to Know about MOOCs

What Teachers Need to Know about MOOCs | Online and Digital learning | Scoop.it
MOOCs (Massive Ope Online Courses) are definitely a game changer in today's education. The emergence and popularization of MOOCs is due primarily to the widespread of internet connection and to the...

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MOOCs as Neocolonialism: Who Controls Knowledge?

MOOCs as Neocolonialism: Who Controls Knowledge? | Online and Digital learning | Scoop.it

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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, December 4, 2013 11:33 PM

"Massive open online courses, or MOOCs, are the latest effort to harness information technology for higher education. While they are still in a nascent stage of development, many in academe are enthusiastic about their potential to be an inexpensive way of delivering an education to vast audiences.

 

 

 

Yet one aspect of the MOOC movement has not been fully analyzed: who controls the knowledge. MOOCs are largely an American-led effort, and the majority of the courses available so far come from universities in the United States or other Western countries. Universities and educators in less-developed regions of the world are climbing onto the MOOC bandwagon, but it is likely that they will be using the technology, pedagogical ideas, and probably significant parts of the content developed elsewhere. In this way, the online courses threaten to exacerbate the worldwide influence of Western academe, bolstering its higher-education hegemony."

A/Prof Jon Willis's curator insight, December 5, 2013 9:30 PM

"Neither knowledge nor pedagogy is neutral ... Those responsible for creating, designing, and delivering MOOC courses do not seek to impose their values or methodologies on others; influence happens organically and without conspiracies. A combination of powerful academic cultures, the location of the main creators and disseminators of MOOCs, and the orientation of most of those creating and teaching MOOCs ensures the domination of the largely English-speaking academic systems."

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MOOC Mania: Debunking the hype around massive open online courses | Audrey Watters - School Library Journa

MOOC Mania: Debunking the hype around massive open online courses | Audrey Watters - School Library Journa | Online and Digital learning | Scoop.it

MOOC mania taps into powerful narratives—both true and false—about the relevancy of the curriculum, the cost of college, and the adaptability of education institutions. Many institutions are joining MOOCs, hoping that the mania pans out and that these free online classes will, if nothing else, keep their brands up-to-date. But the questions about who exactly they’re serving with these classes will have to be answered sooner or later as having tens of thousands of students sign up for a class is hardly the right metric upon which to build the future of education.


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suifaijohnmak's comment, April 20, 2013 11:42 PM
Great insights Peter. I will respond to this. People are "buying" in with the xMOOCs for reasons as simple as: branding and easier to learn (as all information are already curated for them), and that a strong belief still with the instructivist approach reigns best, at least, that is what institutions want to see - a complete control under an institutional framework of education. Is that xMOOC sustainable? From a historical perspective, this fate would be like cMOOCs being "decimated" and "replaced" by xMOOCs (to some extent". But then this trend would appear in the K-12 sector soon, when automation of education and gamification, mobile learning takes their foothold in changing the education arena into "commercial minefield". Mobile technology could and would help in improving digital literacy, though it might not be reflected easily in improving the basic literacy on Science, Maths, Reading and Writing in the K-12. As I have shared, we are now in the Lord of the Ring game, where those who win takes all. Education is now a game, not as much as the once enlightenment or passion sort of education vision, but a pragmatic sort of education of whether one could get a job after taking a course of study, or getting famous through "educating" others in MOOCs. It is the media that would likely determine who is the winner, not the test anymore, as no one could objectively test or examine what is really "competent" or "capable" under those framework, mainly because they are producer driven, not user driven. John
Peter B. Sloep's comment, April 21, 2013 2:46 AM
Thanks for this, John. Future gazing is hard. I would hope you're wrong, but the US seems to be falling into the trap you describe without even realising it. I am of course referring to the initiative in California to set up a credit award system for xMOOCs.
suifaijohnmak's comment, April 21, 2013 10:19 AM
Thanks Peter. As you said, I do hope that wouldn't happen, though when institutions are seeing a few millions students registering with the MOOCs, wouldn't they think that is what the future lies? Here is my consolidated post http://suifaijohnmak.wordpress.com/2013/04/21/why-c-and-x-moocs-are-attracting-different-number-of-participants/ As you said, the initiative in California is just the start of the game. More will come along, when the k-12 MOOCs start to take its turn. I don't have the crystal ball, but I reckon this would attract more Venture Capitalists to invest in that area, as it is a multi-billion education business that no one wants to miss. Privatization and monetization based on a MOOC model has already started and would snowball with more institutions joining in.
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European Journal of Open, Distance and E-Learning

European Journal of Open, Distance and E-Learning | Online and Digital learning | Scoop.it

Open online courses (OOC) with a massive number of students have represented an important development for online education in the past years.
A course on artificial intelligence, CS221, at the University of Stanford was offered in the fall of 2011 free and online which attracted 160,000 registered students. It was one of three offered as an experiment by the Stanford computer science department to extend technology knowledge and skills to the entire world. The instructors were two of the best known experts in the subject of artificial intelligence. Although students would not get Stanford University grades or credit, 20,000 from 190 countries finished the course successfully receiving a “statement of accomplishment” from the tutors Sebastian Thrun and Peter Norvig. Udacity is a start-up from the authors of CS221 delivering similar massive free online courses. EdX, a joint partnership between The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Harvard University to offer online learning to millions of people around the world, is one of the most recent proposals in this realm.
Massive open online courses known as connectivist MOOCs (c-MOOCs) on the other hand have been delivered since 2008. They are based on the explicit principles of connectivism (autonomy, diversity, openness and interactivity) and on the activities of aggregation, remixing, repurposing and feeding forward the resources and learning.
In the research literature, newspaper and magazine articles both types of OOCs, AI-Stanford like courses (AI) and c-MOOCs, have been identified in many occasions as equivalent.
Distance education (DE) pedagogy can be classified through the evolution of three categories: cognitive-behaviourist, social constructivist, and connectivist. These three current and future generations of DE pedagogy have an important place in a well-rounded educational experience. To a large extent, the generations have evolved in tandem with the technologies and all three models are very much in existence today and are categorized by a set of conditions.
In this paper we study in detail representative courses from AI and c-MOOC formats. We establish that although they share the use of distributed networks the format associated with c-MOOCs, which are defined by a participative pedagogical model, are unique and different from AI. We further assign to the AI to a cognitive-behaviourist (with some small contribution of social constructivist) and MOOCs to connectivist pedagogy.


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Student recruitment as MOOC business model

Student recruitment as MOOC business model | Online and Digital learning | Scoop.it
Will massive open online courses (MOOCs) prove to be viable business models? Leonard Waks takes a close look at various MOOC experiments.

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EmilyNicholsMitchell's curator insight, December 10, 2013 4:25 PM

Check out the MOOC to aid in your learning and development. 

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MOOCs go micro: Everpath is the latest offering a platform for people to host their own classes

MOOCs go micro: Everpath is the latest offering a platform for people to host their own classes | Online and Digital learning | Scoop.it
Whether or not you buy into them or have already given up on them, it’s the age of MOOCs — massive open online courses.

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MOOCs: taxonomy of 8 types of MOOC | Donald Clark Plan B Blog

MOOCs: taxonomy of 8 types of MOOC | Donald Clark Plan B Blog | Online and Digital learning | Scoop.it

What are MOOCs?

 

“The future is already here, it’s just not very evenly distributed” said William Gibson, that is certainly true of MOOCs. We have MOOC mania but ‘all MOOCs are not created equal’ and there’s lots of species of MOOC. This is good and we must learn from these experiments to move forward and not get bogged down in old traditionalist v modernist arguments. MOOCs will inform and shape what we do within and without institutions. What is important is to focus on the real needs of real learners.
Taxonomy based on pedagogy

To this end, it is important to define a taxonomy of MOOCs not from the institutional but the pedagogic perspective, by their learning functionality, not by their origins. So here's a starting list of eight:

 

Click headline to read more and watch video clip--


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Rethinking Online Community in MOOCs Used for Blended Learning

Rethinking Online Community in MOOCs Used for Blended Learning | Online and Digital learning | Scoop.it
EDUCAUSE Review Online

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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, October 23, 2013 12:59 PM

"Unlike students in small online courses or unaffiliated students in MOOCS, distributed flip students might not use community features. If MOOCs for blended learning are tofully realize the potential of online communities, we mustinvestigate alternative forms of community that are moreloosely coupled to content sequence and more distributed in terms of power."

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Stanford’s Venture Lab MOOC Platform Goes Private, Relaunches as NovoEd | Matt Enis - Library Journal

Stanford’s Venture Lab MOOC Platform Goes Private, Relaunches as NovoEd | Matt Enis - Library Journal | Online and Digital learning | Scoop.it

Stanford has become a hotbed of activity in the MOOC field, with NovoEd now the third MOOC platform to emerge from the university during the past two years following Udacity and Coursera. According to Stanford professor and NovoEd founder Amin Saberi, this latest platform is unique in the way it facilitates and emphasizes interaction between students, encouraging the formation of groups and collaboration on projects. Students also rate the work and participation of others within their groups, creating a system of accountability to one’s peers.


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Peter B. Sloep's comment, April 16, 2013 4:46 AM
Glad to be helpful (again apparently ;-)
Parke Muth's comment, April 16, 2013 5:03 AM
Great information. Thank you.
JohnRobertson's curator insight, April 18, 2013 10:10 AM

I can't help wondering how this compares to other efforts. For example, @openstudy who run social structures and support around opencourseware such as some of MIT's OCW. As a clear example I'm still struck by how the Mechanical MOOC ( @MOOC_E ) pulled together 3 or 4 services (including openstudy) to provide a framework around OCW. I'm not sugesting their approach would work for every discipline but I'm a little surprised at the fanfare NovoEd has got in the press.