Online and Blended Learning in K-12+
2.6K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Gordon Dahlby
onto Online and Blended Learning in K-12+
Scoop.it!

It's About Time — IDEA

It's About Time — IDEA | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it

IT’S ABOUT TIME
Learning Time and Educational Opportunity in California High Schools
Executive Summary
November 2014
California high school teachers are constantly racing against the clock. They are expected to
provide a strong college preparatory curriculum, promote critical and creative thinking, and meet
students’ social and emotional needs. Learning time is an essential resource for addressing all of
these goals. But, it seems to be in short supply in many California high schools.
This report draws on a statewide teacher survey to examine how learning time is distributed
across California high schools. The survey, conducted by UCLA IDEA during the 2013-2014
school year, included a representative sample of nearly 800 teachers. These teachers work at a
demographically diverse set of schools and hail from every region of the state.
Throughout the report, we compare learning time across three groups of high schools:
1) Low Poverty Schools (0-25% of students receive Free or Reduced Price Lunch);
2) Low and Mixed Poverty Schools (0-50% of students receive Free or Reduced Price
Lunch);
3) High Poverty Schools (75-100% of students receive Free or Reduced Price Lunch).
Core findings include:
•Teachers in High Poverty Schools are more likely than their peers to report that learning
time is undermined by problems with school facilities, lack of access to school libraries
and technology, and insufficient qualified substitute teachers.
•High school teachers reported that 3-4 times more students in High Poverty Schools than
in Low Poverty Schools experience a variety of economic and social stressors that impact
learning time, such as unstable housing, hunger, and lack of access to medical or dental
care. On any given day, there is a 39% chance that these stressors affect learning time in
a High Poverty School classroom compared to a 13% chance in a Low Poverty School
classroom.
•High Poverty Schools experience greater time loss than other schools in the state during
class periods due to interruptions, delays, or routines. Much of this time loss results
from institutional challenges such as incorporating new students after the school year
starts or receiving phone calls from the main office. Instructional time lost in these ways
adds up. Over the course of an average day, students in High Poverty Schools lose
roughly 30 minutes more than their counterparts in Low Poverty Schools due to these
factors during class periods.
•In addition to losing more time during class periods, High Poverty Schools experience a
number of other disruptions that cut into scheduled instructional time across the school
calendar. High Poverty Schools face more disrupted or lost days than other schools due to teacher absences, emergency lockdowns, and preparation for standardized tests. Over
the course of the year, High Poverty Schools lose almost ten days more than Low Poverty
Schools (22.3 days to 12.6 days).
•Teachers in High Poverty Schools spend more time than their peers attending to a
variety of non-instructional duties, from supervising students during lunch to taking care
of janitorial and clerical tasks to covering classes for absent colleagues. Over the course
of an average week, teachers in High Poverty Schools spend an hour more than their
counterparts in Low Poverty Schools on these non-teaching responsibilities.
•Teachers in High Poverty Schools spend as much time as their peers planning lessons,
offering written feedback to student work, and providing academic support.
•Teachers in High Poverty Schools report addressing a variety of important academic,
social, and long-term planning issues with their students more frequently than teachers in
Low Poverty Schools or Low and Mixed Poverty Schools. Teachers in High Poverty
Schools spend substantially more time than their peers discussing community problems
and various forms of societal inequality, providing social or emotional counseling, and
offering college and career guidance.
This study highlights the need for renewed attention to questions about equal access to learning
time. California holds students to a common set of assessment standards and requirements for
university admission. Yet students have access to markedly different amounts of instructional
time depending on the neighborhoods in which they live. It is true that schools can use available
learning time in more or less effective ways. But the amount of available learning time creates a
ceiling, limiting the capacity of the school to promote student achievement and development.
No one could or would defend a system of public education that required students attending High
Poverty Schools to finish their school year two weeks before their peers in Low Poverty Schools.
Nor would anyone defend sending students from High Poverty Schools home a half hour early
each day. California now supports an educational system that produces these effects. Through
new and targeted investment, this inequality can be transformed. It’s about time.
To view the full document, visit: http://idea.gseis.ucla.edu/
Made possible by a grant from The Ford Foundation
Prepared by:
The Institute for Democracy, Education, and Access (IDEA)
University of California, Los Angeles
© University of California, Los Angeles IDEA, 2014
Citation: Rogers, J., Mirra, N., Seltzer, M., & Jun, J. (2014). It’s About Time:
Learning Time and Educational Opportunity in California High Schools. Los
Angeles: IDEA.

more...
No comment yet.
Online and Blended Learning in K-12+
Resources for Online and Blended Learning
Curated by Gordon Dahlby
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Gordon Dahlby
Scoop.it!

Challenge Institute 2018

Challenge Institute 2018 | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it

Join educators from around the nation to investigate the big idea of learning, identify pressing challenges, and design sustainable solutions! The Digital Promise Challenge Institute 2018 will be a fully immersive, hands-on professional learning experience that transcends the traditional divide between speakers and participants to create a vibrant and ongoing community. Dates: July 9-11, 2018 Beginning at 2:00 PM on July 9 and closing at 9:00 PM on July 11 Location: Monterey, CA

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Dahlby
Scoop.it!

50-State Comparison: States’ School Accountability Systems

50-State Comparison: States’ School Accountability Systems | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it
School accountability systems can serve many purposes, including sharing information, measuring progress toward state and local goals and supporting greater educational equity. Given the important role accountability systems play in states’ education systems, many states are taking the opportunity provided by the Every Student Succeeds Act to improve upon their existing systems.

ESSA offers states more authority over their accountability systems than they had under previous federal law. As a result, many states are transitioning from a system focused on assessments and graduation rates to one that incorporates a wider variety of measures of school quality. While each state must weigh the pros and cons of codifying its accountability system, many states’ current policies do not currently align with their ESSA plans.

This resource captures an important transition period in state accountability systems by providing a national overview of these systems as described in current state statute and regulation, where available, and in states’ ESSA plans (as of October 2017). State statute and regulation often outline or provide a foundation for accountability systems. In some cases, states may operate multiple systems to ensure school quality, not all of which are described in statute and regulation. To help fill in the blanks that are not described in state policies, other resources (where publicly available) have been provided.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Dahlby
Scoop.it!

Cyberlearning Community Report: The State of Cyberlearning and the Future of Learning With Technology – The Center for Innovative Research in Cyberlearning (CIRCL)

Cyberlearning Community Report: The State of Cyberlearning and the Future of Learning With Technology – The Center for Innovative Research in Cyberlearning (CIRCL) | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it
The cyberlearning community in the United States brings computer scientists and learning scientists together to design and study innovative learning technologies. The Cyberlearning Community Report: The State of Cyberlearning and the Future of Learning With Technology highlights examples of the exciting work our community is engaged in as we integrate the latest innovations in learning science and computer science into new research designs and methods. This work is also driving the need for new learning sciences in areas such as embodied cognition, identity, and affect, and requires advances in methods, such as multimodal analytics, and in computer science, such as in context-sensitive computing.

The report, organized by The Center for Innovative Research in Cyberlearning (CIRCL) and co-authored by 22 members of the U.S. cyberlearning community, describes six design themes emerging across multiple NSF-funded cyberlearning projects:
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Dahlby
Scoop.it!

Why personalized learning is hard to study - Christensen Institute

Why personalized learning is hard to study - Christensen Institute | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it
This week saw the release of the third in a series of personalized learning studies conducted by the RAND Corporation. The research analyzed implementation, survey, and efficacy data in a sample of schools that are part of the Next Generation Learning Challenges (NGLC) portfolio, and compared that data to a national sample of schools. The findings? NGLC schools yielded some positive academic results, but educators and administrators reported numerous challenges. And in some cases, such as how often teachers reported “keeping up-to-date documentation of student strengths, weaknesses, and goals,” the researchers detected little to no difference between personalized NGLC schools versus traditional schools. (NB: For those familiar with last 2015 RAND report on personalized learning by the same authors, it’s worth noting a crucial distinction: this new study analyzed a group of 32 schools only 16 of which were included in the set of over 60 schools in the 2015 sample, which helps to explain some divergent conclusions drawn between the two.)

Advocates for and critics against personalized learning will inevitably interpret these findings in wildly different ways.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Dahlby
Scoop.it!

Finch Robot | The Finch

Finch Robot | The Finch | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it
Catalyze Computer Science Learning!

The Finch is a small robot designed to inspire and delight students learning computer science by providing them a tangible and physical representation of their code.  The Finch has support for over a dozen programming languages, including environments appropriate for students as young as five years old!  The Finch was developed to catalyze a wide range of computer science learning experiences, from an entry into the basics of computational thinking all the way to writing richly interactive programs. Try programming a Finch today!


On-board features include:
Accelerometers
Motors
Buzzer
Full-color beak LED

Light, temperature, and obstacle sensors
Pen mount for drawing capability
Plugs into USB port - no batteries required!
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Dahlby
Scoop.it!

Assessing Online Readiness of Students

The rise of distance education has created a need to understand students’ readiness for online learning and to predict their success. Several survey instruments have been developed to assess this construct of online readiness. However, a review of the extant literature shows that these instruments have varying limitations in capturing all of the domains of student online readiness. Important variables that have been considered in assessing the online readiness of students for distance education include attrition and information and communications technology (ICT) engagement. Previous studies have indicated that high attrition rates for online programs can be prevented by assessing student online readiness. The present study examined undergraduate students’ online readiness using an instrument that was developed by the researchers that included constructs such as information communications technology engagement, motivation, self-efficacy, and learner characteristics. The addition of these subscales further strengthen the reliability and validity of online learning readiness surveys in capturing all the domains of student online readiness.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Dahlby
Scoop.it!

Center for Digiatl Education Reports & Papers

Center for Digiatl Education Reports & Papers | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it
Check out Center for Digital Education papers page for an every growing library of resources and papers. 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Dahlby
Scoop.it!

Study finds link between school
climate and literacy achievement

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Dahlby
Scoop.it!

Report Busts Online College Myths, Details Demographics

Report Busts Online College Myths, Details Demographics | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it
A survey by Learning House and Aslanian Market Research shows that several online college myths are just that -- and that demographics are changing quickly.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Dahlby
Scoop.it!

Survey Reveals Unique Insights to US Students' Attitudes Towards Plagiarism - RefME | Free Reference Generator – Harvard, APA, MLA, Chicago...

Survey Reveals Unique Insights to US Students' Attitudes Towards Plagiarism - RefME | Free Reference Generator – Harvard, APA, MLA, Chicago... | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it
Citing has long been considered an essential practice in academia, but the increasing availability of information in today’s digital age has fundamentally changed the way some students perceive ‘giving credit where credit is due’. It is therefore crucial that students are well-informed on how and when to cite so that they can avoid being marked down or facing disciplinary action for plagiarism.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Dahlby
Scoop.it!

Promising State Policies for Personalized Learning - iNACOL

Promising State Policies for Personalized Learning - iNACOL | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it
This report is a valuable resource for state policymakers—whether they are seeking to create conditions in state policy to support personalized learning, moving forward with initiatives to develop personalized learning pilot programs, hosting task forces to explore policy issues and needs, or taking a comprehensive policy approach for supporting advanced personalized learning models. Personalized learning is where instruction is tailored to each student’s strengths, needs, and interests—including enabling student voice and choice in what, how, when, and where they learn—to provide flexibility and supports to ensure mastery of the highest standards possible.

State policy makers can become partners with practitioners in identifying and removing system barriers to launching and supporting personalizing learning models to ensure each student’s success. In 2016, states have a historic opportunity to create flexibility to enable powerful, personalized learning experiences with the reauthorization of the Federal K-12 education law, the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA).
Gordon Dahlby's insight:
In personalized learning, instruction is tailored to each student’s strengths, needs, and interests — including enabling student voice and choice in what, how, when, and where they learn — to provide flexibility and supports to ensure mastery of the highest standards possible. 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Dahlby
Scoop.it!

Should we hit the pause button for online and blended learning? - The Hechinger Report

Should we hit the pause button for online and blended learning? - The Hechinger Report | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it

by NICHOLE DOBO April 27, 2016
As more schools scurry to bring technology to the classroom, some say dodgy programs are growing like weeds — and they threaten the existence of successful programs.
Too many students in virtual and blended learning schools are performing poorly, according to a new National Education Policy Center report, released last week, by Gary Miron, a professor at Western Michigan University, and Charisse Gulosino, an assistant professor at the University of Memphis. The center’s annual report about online learning for the first time took a look at blended learning, as well. It found that those schools were not doing much better than fully online schools.
“That was the shock for us,” Miron said.
Both fully online (virtual) schools and blended learning schools included in the report tended to fare worse than traditional schools on state assessments of quality. The report described this as a “red flag.”
The report suggests six solutions:
ADVERTISEMENT



Slow or halt the growth of virtual and blended schools until the reasons for poor performance are identified and solved.
Write rules to hold schools accountable for results and take action against those who fail.
Require virtual and blended schools to devote more money to instruction. Specify a student-teacher ratio.
Mandate the reporting of data on the teachers hired and on the types of students these schools serve.
Promote new strategies to measure outcomes of these schools, taking into account the “unique characteristics” of the programs.
Support more research to identify which policies create conditions that allow high-quality virtual and blended learning schools to thrive.
Online and blended learning schools account for a small but rapidly growing part of the education ecosphere. The report counts 457 full-time virtual schools and 87 blended learning schools. (These are significantly smaller numbers than those reported by the International Association for K-12 Online Learning (iNACOL), an advocacy organization for these types of schools. This may be because of differences in how the groups define virtual and blended-learning schools.)
For-profit schools were singled out in the report as a particularly poor-performing subset of these schools.


Read more...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Dahlby
Scoop.it!

Americans Spending At Least $1.5 Billion in College Remediation Courses; Middle Class Pays the Most - Education Reform Now

Americans Spending At Least $1.5 Billion in College Remediation Courses; Middle Class Pays the Most - Education Reform Now | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it

http://bit.ly/239VdyY ; Americans Spending At Least $1.5 Billion in College Remediation Courses;
Middle Class Pays the Most

Lack of Rigor in High Schools Adds to Cost of College

 

More than half a million college freshmen—approximately one in four students who enter college the fall after high school graduation – had to enroll in remedial coursework during their first year of college, costing their families nearly $1.5 billion annually. Forty-five percent of those students came from middle and upper income families, according to “Out of Pocket: The High Cost of Inadequate High Schools and High School Student Achievement on College Affordability http://bit.ly/239VdyY ,” a new research report from Education Reform Now and Education Post.

Not only does college remediation cut across all income levels, but it’s also common across all types of post-secondary institutions. Nearly half – 43 percent – of remedial students were enrolled in public four-year colleges or private two- and four-year colleges. The other 57 percent were enrolled in public community colleges.

The report’s co-author, Mary Nguyen Barry of Education Reform Now, said, “We have long studied how our country’s elementary and secondary schools have underserved low-income students and students of color, but inadequate academic preparation does not end with students and schools from low-income communities.  The problem is much more widespread. Inadequate high school preparation, as reflected by postsecondary remedial course enrollment, is also a middle class and upper-class problem and has real out-of-pocket financial consequences for all.”

Peter Cunningham, Executive Director of Education Post, which commissioned the study, said, “High schools are not rigorous enough. Higher standards have raised the bar but we need to hold schools accountable for meeting those standards.”

Researchers at Education Reform Now used the most recent data collected by the U.S. Department of Education through the National Postsecondary Student Aid Survey and Beginning Postsecondary Student survey. Along with per-student estimates on out-of-pocket costs (i.e. after financial aid) associated with remedial courses, the researchers conclude that first-year remedial college students and families spent $1.5 billion on tuition and living expenses, including $380 million in loans, for content and skills they should have learned in high school.

Higher income students pay the most

One in four college freshmen pay on average an extra $3,000 and borrow nearly an extra $1,000 for remedial coursework in their first year of college. However, students from families in the top income quintile that attend more expensive private nonprofit four-year colleges pay on average an extra $12,000 for remedial classes.

While underprepared students average two remedial courses each during their first year, higher-income students at expensive private nonprofit four-year colleges take more remedial classes than lower-income students at those same colleges, suggesting these schools enroll many lower-achieving but higher-income students.

All told, private colleges enroll just 11 percent of the total first-time freshmen remedial population, but they account for more than three times as much of the cost and debt associated with remedial education.

Longer to Graduate, Delayed Earnings, Adult Learners

Full-time students seeking bachelor’s degrees that take remedial courses in their first year are 74 percent more likely to drop out of college. Those who do graduate take 11 months longer than non-remedial students, requiring additional living expenses and delaying earnings.

“Imagine how much more affordable college could be if we could get more students to graduate and graduate on time.  You used to get a four-year degree in four years.  Today, the typical student takes five years to complete a bachelor’s degree,” said Michael Dannenberg of Education Reform Now, a co-author of the report.

The $1.5 billion figure does not include other categories of remedial education students, including adult learners and students who do not go directly from high school to college.  Nor does it include extra general taxpayer costs for postsecondary education subsidies.

Read report here. 

***

Education Reform Now is a non-profit think tank based in Washington, DC that aims to develop the next generation of progressive education ideas and leaders.  Education Post is a non-partisan, non-profit communications organization dedicated to building support for student-focused improvements in public education.

Gordon Dahlby's insight:
via edreformnow.org 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Dahlby
Scoop.it!

The Fiscal Externalities of Charter Schools: Evidence from North Carolina by Helen F. Ladd, John D. Singleton :: SSRN

A significant criticism of the charter school movement is that funding for charter schools diverts money away from traditional public schools. As shown in prior


detailed budgetary information permits us to estimate a range of fiscal impacts using a variety of different assumptions. We find a large and negative fiscal impact from $500-$700 per pupil in our one urban school district and somewhat smaller, but still significant, fiscal externalities on the non-urban districts"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Dahlby
Scoop.it!

MIT Launches Digital Plus Courses for Professional Learning -- Campus Technology

MIT Professional Learning is launching a new program designed to offer organizations courses for their employees that feature project-based challenges designed by Massachusetts Institute of Technology faculty.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Dahlby
Scoop.it!

Informing Progress: Insights on Personalized Learning Implementation and Effects | RAND

Informing Progress: Insights on Personalized Learning Implementation and Effects | RAND | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it
This report describes the concept and implementation of personalized learning, along with some of the challenges and facilitators, and considers achievement findings in a small sample of schools.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Dahlby
Scoop.it!

The History of School Vouchers Isn't Flattering

The History of School Vouchers Isn't Flattering | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it
Last week, The Center for American Progress released a report entitled "The Racist Origins of Private School Vouchers." It details the history that followed the Brown vs. Board order to desegregate public schools. In Prince Edward County, Virginia, the county responded by slashing funding for public schools, and even shutting down the public schools entirely for five years. Meanwhile, the state established a new program that gave white students vouchers to attend segregated private schools – and no option for black students to receive a public education.

We argued that the path to equality starts with recognizing this problematic history and continues through thoughtful accountability and protections for vulnerable students.

This report generated a critical response from Rick Hess, author of the blog, Straight Up, head of the education program at the conservative American Enterprise Institute and a frequent U.S. News contributor. In it, he argues that the history we describe is inaccurate, while simultaneously agreeing that, "this history is real, problematic, and part of the school-choice story."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Dahlby
Scoop.it!

KQED Teach

KQED Teach | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it

Free online courses for educators who want the necessary media skills to lead a 21st Century classroom.

KQED Teach provides a series of free, self-paced courses to help K-12 educators develop the media skills necessary to bring media production and communication to their learning environments.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Dahlby
Scoop.it!

Help Us, Dr. Webb, with Depth of Knowledge. You're Our Only Hope.

Help Us, Dr. Webb, with Depth of Knowledge.  You're Our Only Hope. | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Dahlby
Scoop.it!

Adobe Generation Professional: Animation for the Classroom | Adobe Education Exchange

Adobe Generation Professional: Animation for the Classroom | Adobe Education Exchange | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it
Course Overview

This five-week course focuses on the deceptively simple art of animation. Educators create a number of different types of digital animations using the latest Adobe tools. Throughout the process, participants explore best practices for integrating digital media into your classroom. All the content you produce can be used to model good practices within your own university, college or school. Each week of the course will introduce you to a new theme and an industry expert from the world of digital animation. As a result, you’ll become more confident with cutting-edge digital tools, more effective as a teacher, and more of an inspiration to your students.

We will be exploring Adobe Animate, Adobe Photoshop and Adobe After Effects.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Dahlby
Scoop.it!

The Scope of edX | Technology and Learning

The Scope of edX | Technology and Learning | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it
Even though we may hear less about MOOCs than we once did, that does not mean that we should not pay attention to where this movement is going. Let me share some edX numbers that blew my mind: There are 8.3 million (unique) lifelong learners on the edX platform. Between 2012, when edX started, and today - there have been 27 million course enrollments. Over 1,000 courses have been offered. There have been over 2,300 faculty and staff that have taught on edX. Over 840,000 certificates have been earned by edX learners. EdX has over 100 schools, institutes and organizations in the Consortium creating open online courses
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Dahlby
Scoop.it!

Digital Public Library of America

Digital Public Library of America | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it

Developers make apps that use the library’s data in many different ways


The vision of a national digital library has been circulating among librarians, scholars, educators, and private industry representatives since the early 1990s. Efforts led by a range of organizations, including the Library of Congress, HathiTrust, and the Internet Archive, have successfully built resources that provide books, images, historic records, and audiovisual materials to anyone with Internet access. Many universities, public libraries, and other public-spirited organizations have digitized materials, but these digital collections often exist in silos. The DPLA brings these different viewpoints, experiences, and collections together in a single platform and portal, providing open and coherent access to our society’s digitized cultural heritage. The DPLA planning process began in October 2010 at a meeting in Cambridge, MA. During this meeting, 40 leaders from libraries, foundations, academia, and technology projects agreed to work together to create “an open, distributed network of comprehensive online resources that would draw on the nation’s living heritage from libraries, universities, archives, and museums in order to educate, inform, and empower everyone in current and future ­generations.” In December 2010, the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University, generously supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, convened leading experts in libraries, technology, law, and education to begin work on this ambitious project. A two-year process of intense grassroots community organization, beginning in October 2011 and hosted at the Berkman Center, brought together hundreds of public and research librarians, innovators, digital humanists, and other volunteers—organized into six workstreams and led by a distinguished Steering Committee—helped to scope, design, and construct the DPLA. The DPLA is led now by Executive Director Dan Cohen and guided by a Board of Directors comprised of leading public and research librarians, technologists, intellectual property scholars, and business experts from around the country. Based in Boston in the historic Boston Public Library, DPLA has grown from an initial staff of four to nearly ten, including an in-house technical team. To read more about the DPLA team, visit our our staff page.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Dahlby
Scoop.it!

Questions for the Effective & Efficient Educator

Questions for the Effective & Efficient Educator | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it
1. Do you say “my” class or “our” class?

2. Do you utter, “It is so very good to see you,” while your tone and body posture scream, “I can’t wait to go home”?

3. If students were to construct a statue in your honor, would it portray you seated at your desk, or would the artistic task be impossible to complete due to your lack of stillness that originates from an incessant energy and an undeniable passion for teaching?

4. If a movie were being made about your teaching practices and your classes, what actor/actress would play your role? What’s the title? Would any tickets be sold?

5. Do you remember to snack and hydrate throughout the day so your blood-sugar levels do not fluctuate and cause your students to wonder what alien stole your body?

6. Do you slow down, pause for reflection, and focus on the important details, or is the speed of your teaching practices creating a collision?

7. Do you multi-task while speaking with students, or do you pause your present activity, make eye contact, and engage in a meaningful conversation that leads to collective inspiration and understanding?

8. Could your “supplies needed” list easily be used for a 1960’s classroom, or does it appear you are preparing for students like Adora Svitak, Thomas Suarez, Jack Andraka, Richard Turere, or any other brilliant students? Click here (and here) to see examples of two 21st Century lists.

9. Is humor a mainstay in your classes?
Gordon Dahlby's insight:
Published August 2014
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Dahlby
Scoop.it!

7 Qualities That Promote Teacher Leadership in Schools

7 Qualities That Promote Teacher Leadership in Schools | Online and Blended Learning in K-12+ | Scoop.it
There’s a growing consensus among students, parents, teachers and education leaders that the current education system isn’t appropriately preparing young people for the future. Many districts are looking toward technology to patch the disconnect, but several recent reports indicate that technology alone cannot fix the ailing system.

High-quality teachers are essential to learning environments that consider each student as a unique, individual learner, but very few schools have good systems in place to support teachers learning together and sharing their expertise.

‘I’ve seen teachers support each other to develop the agency, confidence and skills in a very short time to do some remarkable things.’
Barnett Berry
Given the need for change felt by many involved in education, there may be a unique opening right now to invest in teacher leadership as a way forward. Founder and CEO of the Center for Teaching Quality, Barnett Berry, recently published a report summarizing 30 years of research on best practices to empower teachers to lead and improve practice. He says three shifts in policy and leadership culture may help move these efforts forward:

New types of assessment are gaining ground. Several states are piloting performance-based assessments to replace standardized testing.
Exemplars in the business community are now promoting flat organizational structures, where employees work in smaller teams and have more voice and power over how they work.
Teachers are more networked than ever before, providing a unique opportunity to share and spread good teaching practice.
“I’ve been around for a long time and I’ve seen teachers support each other to develop the agency, confidence and skills in a very short time to do some remarkable things,” Berry said. The most clear examples
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Gordon Dahlby
Scoop.it!

Beginning Spanish by PBS LearningMedia on iBooks

Read a free sample or buy Beginning Spanish by PBS LearningMedia. You can read this book with iBooks on your iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, or Mac.
more...
No comment yet.