On Translating Australian Literature
61 views | +0 today
Follow
On Translating Australian Literature
Exploring the images, ideas, issues and news surrounding Australian literature in translation.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Jessica Trevitt
Scoop.it!

3. Australian Literature Translated into Italian

A socio-cultural exploration.

Jessica Trevitt's insight:

To complete the series for today, see:

http://www.nla.gov.au/openpublish/index.php/jasal/article/viewFile/1849/2634

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jessica Trevitt
Scoop.it!

1. Australian Literature Translated into French

An analysis of translation techniques.

Jessica Trevitt's insight:

The first in a series of scoops addressing aspects of how Australian literature has been translated for other cultures:

http://www.erudit.org/revue/meta/2006/v/n3/013554ar.html

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jessica Trevitt
Scoop.it!

New Image for Scoop

Re-thinking my use of the Australian flag as a representation of this scoop...

Jessica Trevitt's insight:

On the tram on the way home today I overheard a heated conversation between a young couple about the use of national flags as representative images. The guy made a simple point that came home to me straight away and I made a mental note to change the flags that I had originally put up to represent my Australian and Quebec Scoops. 

 

His point: flags are symbols, and you can't be sure what they're going to symbolise for any one person. 

 

I did a quick research and came across the following links that show a couple of different approaches to the same point -

 

http://www.thepunch.com.au/articles/our-national-flag-has-been-highjacked-by-hillbillies/

Packs a punch all right

 

http://www.1place.com.au/1P/blog1p/?p=4097

Official but packs a punch of its own

 

http://asiapacific.anu.edu.au/news-events/all-stories/anu-academic-proposes-new-australian-flag#.URtprR0Uva8

Academic explanation of the proposed new flag that tries to dictate its meaning...but is it possible to dictate symbolism? As quoted in the first link: "Like all strong symbols, flags have connotations and secondary meaning which might be positive, negative, conservative or cutting edge in various contexts."

 

Hence the change of picture to a satellite image of a land mass clearly set in a wider global context (so I've dictated a symbolism of my own here - but I guess we all have to at some point). That is, for a scoop that is trying to bring as broad an approach as possible to the notion of "Australian literature", the scope for political and historical associations with that flag would have immediately conjured in some readers just the type of bias this discussion is trying to overcome.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jessica Trevitt
Scoop.it!

RIP. Wet Ink, the magazine of new writing

RIP. Wet Ink, the magazine of new writing | On Translating Australian Literature | Scoop.it
Wet Ink, the magazine of new writing. It’s the place to discover some of today’s best up-and-coming talent, as well as new works by established authors.
Jessica Trevitt's insight:

A magazine like this could have developed into a platform for translated Indigenous work, or for the promotion of new local writers to get them on their way to translation overseas... Going through its back issues it has an impressive seven-year history.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jessica Trevitt
Scoop.it!

Re. "Words Without Borders"

Re. "Words Without Borders" | On Translating Australian Literature | Scoop.it
Jessica Trevitt's insight:

I'm yet to explore this magazine called "Framed", but am scooping the page here for its introduction to "Words Without Borders", which I read regularly and recommend.

 

In particular see the last few paragraphs of the interview re. translation of Indigenous Australian poetry - translation to follow in next scoop.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jessica Trevitt
Scoop.it!

An initial look at translating non-Indigenous Australian literature

An initial look at translating non-Indigenous Australian literature | On Translating Australian Literature | Scoop.it
Jessica Trevitt's insight:

To follow the scoop about translating Indigenous Australian literature, here is a link to an article concerned with what I originally had boxed in my head under "Australian literature in translation": White and Lawson into Spanish. Particularly interesting question in the last paragraph: what benefit does the the target readership AND the source readership derive from the translation of Australian literature?

 

PROBLEMS IN THE TRANSLATION OF
AUSTRALIAN LITERATURE INTO SPANISH

(Anthony Pym)

http://usuaris.tinet.cat/apym/on-line/australia/1989_meanjin.pdf

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jessica Trevitt
Scoop.it!

2. Australian Literature Translated into German

A Catalogue

Jessica Trevitt's insight:

For the second scoop of the series, see:

http://www.geisteswissenschaften.fu-berlin.de/we06/forschung/forschungsprojekte/2010-03-10_Translation_catalogue.pdf

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jessica Trevitt
Scoop.it!

"Miss Translation" on Australian Indigenous Languages

"Miss Translation" on Australian Indigenous Languages | On Translating Australian Literature | Scoop.it
Heading for extinction? Indigenous languages are dying out all over the world, pushed out by the lingua francas and major national languages. Linguists predict that at least half of the 6000 langua...
Jessica Trevitt's insight:

A blog that truly captures both the practical and the entertaining when it comes to translation - and a good example of it here to follow up on my recent scoops.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jessica Trevitt
Scoop.it!

About SPN · SPUNC: Small Press Underground Networking Community

About SPN · SPUNC: Small Press Underground Networking Community | On Translating Australian Literature | Scoop.it
Jessica Trevitt's insight:

I'm going to spend some time leafing through the publishers in this community to see if any are interested in translated works or promoting works for translation.

 

I remember Manager Zoe Dattner talking to us at uni during my first year in 2006, back before she was manager. She was promoting her independent publishing company "Sleepers Publishing". Her enthusiasm and what she told us about the underground publishing community in Melbourne has stuck with me, so it's exciting to see her name come up again here.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jessica Trevitt
Scoop.it!

Thangara - Words Without Borders

Jessica Trevitt's insight:

An Indigenous Australian poem written in 1910 by Cobbin Dale, published by the Australian Institute of Aboriginal Studies in the 1970s and translated in 2011 by a man in Brooklyn. See the last scoop as well.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jessica Trevitt
Scoop.it!

Reading Malouf’s Remembering Babylon in Tokyo (from Meanjin)

Reading Malouf’s Remembering Babylon in Tokyo (from Meanjin) | On Translating Australian Literature | Scoop.it
Jessica Trevitt's insight:

A brief article from the Australian literary magazine "Meanjin" about the recent translation of David Malouf's "Remembering Babylon" into Japanese. Looking forward to seeing what the next book in the translation series will be. Note the statistics - of the 961 Australian books translated into Japanese sicne 1950, 70% are popular romance fiction...and exactly 46 are general fiction!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jessica Trevitt
Scoop.it!

An initial look at translating Indigenous Australian literature

An initial look at translating Indigenous Australian literature | On Translating Australian Literature | Scoop.it
Jessica Trevitt's insight:

When I started this topic I was thinking about the issues involved in translating a Patrick White or a Henry Handel Richardson or a Tim Winton, for example, and I wanted to provide a collection of perspectives on widening the global understanding of Australian literature. After an initial search for scoops, the majority of what I've found has addressed the issues involved in translating  indigenous literature. Given the general lack of understanding of Aboriginal culture amongst non-Aboriginal Australians, let alone the rest of the world, this seems a particularly worthwhile avenue to think about. 

 

I've recently been reading Azade Seyhan's book "Writing Outside the Nation", and in discussing engagement with the literatures of "underrepresented, lesser-known cultures", she notes the importance of recognising the "spaces of untranslatability between languages, cultures and texts". Michael Cronin made a similar point when he said in "Translation and Identity" that through translation we can become more aware of why it is still difficult to understand one another, even once the language barrier has been overcome. In other words, the difficulties in approaching and translating an Aboriginal text for a wider Australian or a global audience can encourage a more focussed recognition and understanding of the differences between these cultures, which in turn can enable each to know the other better.

 

So to get a feel for how much is out there and what questions are being asked, the following are links to some pdf articles. Other scoops on this to come.

 

Can Indigenous contemporary literature of Australia 

sustain itself by becoming international?

(Teresa Podemska-Abt)

http://w3.unisa.edu.au/cil/csaa/files/Podemska_edited_version.pdf

 

Indigenous literature in European contexts:
Aspects of the marketing of the Indigenous literatures of Australia and
Aotearoa/New Zealand in German- and Dutch-speaking countries

(Oliver Haag)

http://www.ub.edu/dpfilsa/jeasa25haag.pdf

 

more...
No comment yet.