On the hunt for religious and spiritual dwellings
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On the hunt for religious and spiritual dwellings
Resources relevant to Dot Points CUS2.3 & CUS2.4 (Board of Studies, 2006, p.54), Specifically: places of religious and spiritual significance in the local community, including the special relationship of Aboriginal people to the land (Board of Studies (2006). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies)
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Sacred Sites Upon the Earth

A sacred site is a place that is thought of as sacred (or holy) to a particular religion. Every one of the world's major religions has sacred sites. Some rel...
Katie Dawson's insight:

This Youtube video is an effective way to introduce the topic of religious and spiritual places in the community as it shows a collection of 'sacred sites' on earth. These range from shrines, churches and temples, to mountains and lakes that hold a religious significance to the culture and community they exist in. This video, although it has only music for audio and little text, would help to give Stage 2 students a context for the topic and an understanding of the diverse range of religious and spiritual places of significance that can be found in the world. 

 

Introducing digital and multimedia texts in the classroom expands the array of resources that can be used for teaching particular content. By integrating a video into a lesson, students’ engagement is heightened due to the additional ‘viewing aspect’ along with reading, writing and listening (Walsh, 2010). It is for this reason a digital or multimedia text should be incorporated into the teaching of HSIE in the classroom.

 

To help introduce the topic, the book ‘Sacred Places of a Lifetime’ would be extremely beneficial. Published by National Geographic, the book explores the religious and spiritual places of significance in a global perspective and provides information on each of the sites. Although the sole purpose is information for travellers, the book is extremely relevant to the above subject matter.

 

 

References

 

Bellows, K. (2008). Sacred Places of a Lifetime. Washington: National Geographic

 

Walsh, M. (2010). Multimodal literacy: what does it mean for classroom practice? Australian Journal od Language and Literacy 33(3) 211-239

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Identifying Aboriginal Sites

Identifying Aboriginal Sites | On the hunt for religious and spiritual dwellings | Scoop.it
Katie Dawson's insight:

 

When introducing an Aboriginal/Torres Strait Islander perspective in the classroom, care needs to be taken when selecting resources. There are particular selection guidelines in addition to the Aboriginal Education and Training Policy (NSW DET, 2008) that states teachers must use “resources that are culturally inclusive.” For the given dot point above, this website effectively complies with this regulation in addition to the guidelines in place. One such indicator of an appropriate resource is the recorded involvement of both people with Aboriginal backgrounds and members of the Aboriginal Heritage Organization.

 

This site is appropriate for Stage 2 students to look at individually and doesn’t necessarily need to be reviewed as a class. It could be used for an assessment in which students must identify examples of the given Aboriginal sites in their particular area or community and to further research the history of the chosen site. Students could also be given the opportunity to present this information in their preferred form. For example blogs, PowerPoint presentations, posters and pamphlets are all good examples of presentation forms.

 

Including Aboriginal Perspectives is a vital aspect of any primary classroom. Dockett, Mason and Perry (2006) support the notion that by including Aboriginal Perspectives in the classroom, it will assist in forming an Aboriginal culture within the school and therefore support the transition to school Aboriginal students. This would further have a beneficial effect on the Aboriginal community and its connections with the school. The above task is therefore an effective way in helping to achieve these things in relation to the dot points CUS2.3 & CUS2.4 (Board of Studies, 2006, p.54).

 

References

NSW Department of Education and Training. (2008). Aboriginal Education and Training Policy. Accessed https://www.det.nsw.edu.au/policies/students/access_equity/aborig_edu/PD20080385.shtml on 19/04/2013

Dockett, S., Mason, T., & Perry, B. (2006). Successful Transition to School for Australian Aboriginal Children, Childhood Education 82(3) 139-144

Board of Studies (2006). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies

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Katie Dawson's comment, April 9, 2013 10:13 PM
- Aboriginal educational policy... and http://www.schools.nsw.edu.au/raps/flytrap/pdf/ResourceGuide.pdf
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World Heritage Centre - Initiative on Heritage of Religious Interest

World Heritage Centre - Initiative on Heritage of Religious Interest | On the hunt for religious and spiritual dwellings | Scoop.it
UNESCO World Heritage Centre
Katie Dawson's insight:

 

It is important to integrate literacy into other key learning areas such as HSIE. This website provides a teacher with opportunities to do this. Literacy strategies that could be incorporated into a lesson designed around this website could include the writing of a letter, creating pamphlets, crafting posters and writing of a speech. Literacy skills such as acquiring information and using an inquiry process (Board of Studies, 2006, p9) are evident in these activities.

 

For example, as a class students could decipher the website together, finding meaning and purpose from the text. For a stage two class, the teacher would need to ensure understanding by assisting the students in decoding the information. Following this, students could be given a hypothetical scenario in which a religious or spiritual site is in danger of being destroyed by an organisation. Students could then be asked to respond to this scenario using the above literacy examples. The aim of the task would be for students to use the information to create an informed opinion about a religious site and its religious significance to the community. Students would be required to combine their knowledge of the topic, their ability to communicate their individual opinions and the information gained from the website.

 

In addition to the effective integration of literacy into an HSIE task, this activity would also allow students to “enhance their sense of personal community, national and global identity,” a vital element of teaching cultural understanding in the classroom according to Southwell (2007, p.35). Global identity and perspectives are important aspects to consider when teaching HSIE. This is also outlined by Calder (2000) who argues the benefits for a democratic society by including global perspectives in the classroom, including respect for others and an involvement in communities. This is vital to consider when teaching any key learning area, at any stage including this particular case (Stage 2 HSIE).

 

References

Board of Studies (2006). Human Society and its Environment K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: B.O.S

Southwell, A. (2007). Developing cultural understanding in the primary classroom. Scan 26(4) p 34-36

Calder, M. (2000). A Concern for Justice: Teaching Using a Global Perspective in the Classroom. Theory into Practice 39(2) p81-87

 

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Search event Page

ABC Religion & Ethics
Katie Dawson's insight:

This Australian Broadcasting Company website is an effective way to search for local religious events in the community. Students could be given a specific community or area to research 'places of religious and spiritual significance' within. The site allows the visitor to specify their search to 'date range', 'region' 'category' (which in this case could be religion or spirituality) in addition to a keyword and directed audience. Each event that is then identified in the refined search specifies a location and details.

 

Through looking at these events, students could begin to identify places of spiritual and religious significance within a given community. For example a search specifying religious events in the Sydney region listed events at locations such as local churches, temples and art galleries.

 

An activity following this could involve drawing a map of the local community area, marking the significant religious and spiritual places. Each marking could have a small annotation with information on the place and its significance. This activity could be done as a class or in small groups. “It is important that students master the necessary skills to be able to read and understand maps” (Marsh, 2010, p.241). It is for this reason that Stage 2 students would benefit from such an activity, allowing them to make a simple map of their local community in order to increase their knowledge of the subject matter in addition to their understanding of maps.

 

By designing a task based around a website such as this one, it successfully introduces the use of ICT into the classroom. Using technology to expand on the variety of possible learning experiences is one of the ways outlined by Orlando (2013, p.139) in which ICT can be beneficial to the classroom. Orlando (2013) suggests that if ICT is integrated in the right way, facilitating learning, it can heighten the student’s engagement in the classroom.

 

References

 

Orlando, J. (2013). Engaging teaching practices with ICT in low SES schools. Exemplary teachers of students in poverty. Oxon: Routledge.

 

Marsh, C. Becoming a teacher: knowledge, skills and issues. Frenchs Forest: Pearson. 

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Calendar of Cultural and Religious Dates

Katie Dawson's insight:

 

 

This site is an excellent starting point for a group activity in a Stage 2 classroom. It is a calendar containing significant dates for a diverse range of religions and cultures. Students could be given the link to this site and then asked to select a religion or country and to further research the particular events listed in relation to their local community or nearby communities. Students could be asked to find places within their community where such events may be celebrated. This would require research of the particular event and a subsequent investigation of the people and places in their community.

 

What is particularly helpful about this site is that it allows the viewer to sort the events by country or religion. For example, students can filter the calendar of events so it displays events or meaningful dates celebrated by Indigenous Australians.

 

It is important to remember in a task such as the above that religion in multicultural classrooms should be approached carefully. It is important to consider the reasons in which religious perspectives are integrated into the classroom and then approach them accordingly. Ryan (2000) suggests the reasons for this include awareness, tolerance, appreciation and understanding. By allowing students to independently investigate the religious and spiritual places in their own community, these attributes could begin to develop in a Stage 2 classroom. In addition to this, the above activity would assist students in making connections between religious and cultural dates, their places of significance and the relevance to their own community.

 

References

Ryan, M., (2000). Teaching Religion in the Multicultural Classroom. Religious Education  Journal of Australia 16(1) 5-10

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