On the Boundaries of Medicine
1.3K views | +0 today
Follow
On the Boundaries of Medicine
Blog for the Fall 2011 Writing 20 class "On the Boundaries of Medicine"
Curated by Maral Erol
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Suggested by Adil Khan
Scoop.it!

Couple Finally Reveals Child's Gender, Five Years After Birth

Couple Finally Reveals Child's Gender, Five Years After Birth | On the Boundaries of Medicine | Scoop.it
It's a boy! And he's five. Beck Laxton, 46, and partner Kieran Cooper, 44, have spent half the decade concealing the gender of their son, Sasha."I wanted to avoid all that stereotyping," Laxton said in an interview with the Cambridge News.
more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Sydney Barfield
Scoop.it!

Statins and the Medicalization of Lifestyle Issues

Statins and the Medicalization of Lifestyle Issues | On the Boundaries of Medicine | Scoop.it

Mascitelli and Pezzetta discuss how statins were introduced and quickly accepted to society. Statins are medications that were made to lower cholesterol and therefore reduce the cases of coronary heart disease. The authors’ main argument is that the popular medication could infact be counter productive. Studies show that the medication has not significantly decreases mortality rates, yet obesity rates are rising. The article discusses that the medicine might give people a false since of security, and therefore they do not make an effort towards a healthier lifestyle. My research was on African American prone diseases. Heart disease is one of the main causes of mortality, and people take statins for it. Without the medication, perhaps more African Americans would change their eating and exercising habits for the better.

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Sydney Barfield
Scoop.it!

The True Causes of Diabetes - Video - iHealthTube.com

The True Causes of Diabetes - Video - iHealthTube.com | On the Boundaries of Medicine | Scoop.it

Many do not know that diabetes can be avoided at an early age my not eating so many sweets. Eating so much sugar can lead to insulin resistance. Moritz proposes that dairy is the leading cause of diabetes because it has high sugar content. This includes breast milk, cheese, and cows' milk. He says that cows' milk has large amounts of protein that the human body is not designed to process at one time. While this was not specific to African Americans, it gave insight on how African Americans could potentially avoid Diabetes ( a leading cause of African American mortality), which is a part of what my research was on.

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Shikha Sachdeva
Scoop.it!

Internet fuels bad self-diagnoses and 'cyberchondria'

Internet fuels bad self-diagnoses and 'cyberchondria' | On the Boundaries of Medicine | Scoop.it

“Internet fuels bad self-diagnoses and ‘cyberchondria’ is an interesting news story that discusses the causes and effects of cyberchondria. This article shockingly states that 8 in 10 Internet users get their medical advice online, and provides an interesting hook about the Padres pitcher, Tim Stauffer. Although the project of my paper is based on the generational difference of cyberchondriacs, this story correctly points out another group more likely to be affected—the audience of pharmaceutical advertisements."

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Samuel Lin
Scoop.it!

Obama Health Care Law Gets Support in First Appellate Review

Obama Health Care Law Gets Support in First Appellate Review | On the Boundaries of Medicine | Scoop.it

One of the key issues with the Affordable Care Act is the individual mandate clause, which requires all Americans to purchase health insurance or else pay serious fines. The U.S. Supreme Court has already agreed to evaluate the constitutionality of the mandate and is currently discussing the issue in the lower courts. This article highlights the recent consensus by the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals in which the judges reached a 2-1 decision that the individual mandate is in the boundaries of the federal government's constitutional powers as outlined by the Interstate Commerce Clause. Although there are still two more courts of appeals that still need to reach a decision, the opinion issued by the Sixth Circuit gives greater weight to healthcare reform.

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Mark Herzog
Scoop.it!

U.S. to Pursue African Rebels

U.S. to Pursue African Rebels | On the Boundaries of Medicine | Scoop.it

This article discusses the deployment of 100 U.S special ops advisors to central Africa. This article marks a significant moment for the area. Up to this point efforts to help deal with the refugee crisis in the area has largely revolved around aide in the form of supplies and medical treatment. The deployment notes a shift in addressing the problem because now a broader social factor is being addressed. By stopping the LRA the US is helping to control the social and politcal unrest that plays a large role in continuing this refugee crisis. 

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Mark Herzog
Scoop.it!

Chad must end the recruitment and use of children in armed conflict | Amnesty International

Chad must end the recruitment and use of children in armed conflict | Amnesty International | On the Boundaries of Medicine | Scoop.it

This article describes a disturbing pattern in the refugee camps of Chad where children are being recruited out of the refugee camps to become child soldiers. These children become child soldiers and feed into the never ending conflict that only worsens the situation within the camps. This article highlights the neccessity for the broader factors at national and subnational levels to be addressed. Amnesty International calls for change at a national level here, but it also shows how merely distributing rations and medicine will not resolve the conflict. 

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Samuel Lin
Scoop.it!

Health Reform Explained Video: "Health Reform Hits Main Street"

This video does a thorough job of summarizing the 2,500 page long Affordable Care Act. The Kaiser Family Foundation describes the effects of the act in a short 10 minutes, engaging the viewers with cute animations and humor. It goes over the loopholes and limitations of the current system and then goes on to describe all of the solutions put forth in the act. At the same time, it answers some of the concerns againt the Affordable Care Act, such as the issue with cost. By focusing on the benefits of healthcare reform while acknowledging the potential limitations, this video provides a great, non-biased overview of the complicated healthcare reform to come.

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Samuel Lin
Scoop.it!

New study finds 45,000 deaths annually linked to lack of health coverage

New study finds 45,000 deaths annually linked to lack of health coverage | On the Boundaries of Medicine | Scoop.it

This article from the Harvard Gazette discusses the findings by Dr. Andrew Wilper, and others, that indicated roughly 45,000 people die each year from a lack of health insurance. Conducted at the Harvard Medical School and the Cambridge Health Alliance, the study noted that uninsured workig Americans have a 40% greater risk of death than their "insured counterparts". The authors attribute this elevated risk to the fact that these individuals have to think twice before going to a doctor's office, often times letting the disease progress to a point where treatment is poor. This is extremely relevant to my paper on healthcare reform since it illustrates that there is a tremendous net-negative for uninsured individuals. 

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Mark Herzog
Scoop.it!

The Standard | Mutunga tells Government off over Bashir court ruling

The Standard | Mutunga tells Government off over Bashir court ruling | On the Boundaries of Medicine | Scoop.it

This article discusses the growing condemnation of Sudan's President al-Bashir who currently has a warrant for his arrest by the International Criminal Court for his role in crimes against humanity in Darfur that is the main source of the refugees along the Chad and Sudan border. This article discusses Kenya's high court placing an additional warrant for his arrest. I wanted to share this article because it captures the essence of the political chaos in Sudan and the area where the current president has a warrant for his arrest by the ICC. Additionally it adds to the argument that social factors at the national level must be addressed (in this case Sudan's as-Bashir). 

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Eileen Lu
Scoop.it!

Stephen Fry on Manic Depression

Stephen Fry is an English actor, screenwriter, author, journalist, comedian and playwright who suffers from manic depression. He has the type Cyclothymia, which he refers to in the video as “bipolar lite.” These type of people are generally more fully functioning in society and are sometimes even more productive. He describes how most people when asked if they would get rid of their disease replied that they wouldn’t. This relates to my paper because I touch on the creative spurts of brilliance and productivity experienced in the manic stage.

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Eileen Lu
Scoop.it!

Bipolar Disorder - Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment of Bipolar Disorder - NY Times Health Information

Bipolar Disorder - Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment of Bipolar Disorder - NY Times Health Information | On the Boundaries of Medicine | Scoop.it

This New York Times article illustrates a type of manic depression, which can often be mistaken for being a pleasurable condition. When people have this milder type of mania, called hypomania, they have a heightened sense of creativity, which makes taking treatment for patients difficult. Without treatment though, this can lead to misjudgments that make them dangers to themselves and the people around them. This relates to my topic because I discuss the temptations of resisting treatment and the importance of treatment for the environmental factors in order for patients to maintain treatment of lithium.

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Arathi Ponugoti
Scoop.it!

North Carolina hearing explores history of forced sterilization

North Carolina hearing explores history of forced sterilization | On the Boundaries of Medicine | Scoop.it

This article describes and addresses a recent hearing in North Carolina in which the families of victim’s of the state’s 20th century eugenics movement were given a chance to share their horrifying stories and seek compensation by the government, and also provides some background on the movement. I was raised in N.C. almost my entire life and was very surprised to learn of the eugenics movement, that took place in the state I call home, which I had never heard mentioned (which is surprising considering the years of N.C. history I took as a child). The movement is not talked about much, and this hearing and article are a sign of progress, which will help to teach people of the dangers of false beliefs on the science behind intelligence. This article is relevant to my topic because I analyze the U.S. eugenics movement in my paper and use it as an example of a mistake in our past that we must learn from in forming beliefs on the subject of the heritability of intelligence.

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Ishaan Jalan
Scoop.it!

How your brain is wired to learn a language in 10 days

How your brain is wired to learn a language in 10 days | On the Boundaries of Medicine | Scoop.it

Every year, people have a list of things they want to change about themselves. Whether it's eating better or exercising more, resolutions are great tools to help change your life for the better. Hope for those of us who are incapable of learning other languages

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Sydney Barfield
Scoop.it!

African American patients and heart disease

African American patients and heart disease | On the Boundaries of Medicine | Scoop.it

Parmley presents many shocking statistics on African Americans with cardiovascular disease. He states that African Americans are 1.5 times more prone to mortality from heart disease than whites. He also advocates a program designed to inform people and teach them how to avoid contracting the disease. He says that research has shown that beta blockers might not be as effective in African Americans and in Caucasians. This collection of statistics helped me put into perspective how big of an issue heart disease is for the black community.

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Shikha Sachdeva
Scoop.it!

Are You a Cyberchondriac?

Are You a Cyberchondriac? | On the Boundaries of Medicine | Scoop.it

I thought this article was incredibly ironic. Cyberchondria is a disorder characterized by a person’s tendency to diagnose and possibly treat themselves based on information found online; “Are You a Cyberchondriac?” is sectioned into subheadings that explain what cyberchondria is, how to know if you are being affected, and how to fix it. Essentially, this article is targeted towards cyberchondriacs, because they are the ones who would be willing to consider that they are being afflicted and attempt to find a solution. This website is a do-it-yourself help manual for those suffering from my topic.

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Shikha Sachdeva
Scoop.it!

Microsoft Examines Causes of ‘Cyberchondria’ - NYTimes.com

Microsoft Examines Causes of ‘Cyberchondria’ - NYTimes.com | On the Boundaries of Medicine | Scoop.it

This article is a brief report on a breakthrough study regarding cyberchondria. Although the term ‘cyberchondria’ emerged in 2000 as an offshoot of hypochondriasis, it wasn’t until 2008, when Microsoft published this data, that concrete evidence existed for this phenomenon. Roughly 2% of all Web queries are health related, and approximately one-third of these escalate into follow-up searches. The proposed source piqued my interest, as well as the statistics. The information provided is similar to the introductory section of my paper.

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Mike Ricaurte
Scoop.it!

How to Overcome Sleeplessness

In this short clip, the physician describes different methods of obtaining a full-night's sleep. At first, he says that most Americans are prone to try medication due to the society in which we live. Then he suggests changing behaviors and mindset to help one obtain sleep, which seems to be a very effective and safe method.

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Mike Ricaurte
Scoop.it!

Sleepless in Glendale

Sleepless in Glendale | On the Boundaries of Medicine | Scoop.it
The other day, I came across a recent study by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. It found that insomnia affects about 23% of U.S. workers, and it put the annual national cost for the sleeping disorder at $63.2 billion.

This article talks about two different types of sleeplessness: one either goes to sleep and wakes up in the middle of the night or cannot go to sleep at night. The author claims that this is a result of the brain being too active. He comes to a joking conclusion that sleeplessness can only be solved by a lobotomy or death. 

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Eileen Lu
Scoop.it!

When Bipolar Disorder Masquerades as a Happy Face

This New York Times article illustrates a type of manic depression, which can often be mistaken for being a pleasurable condition. When people have this milder type of mania, called hypomania, they have a heightened sense of creativity, which makes taking treatment for patients difficult. Without treatment though, this can lead to misjudgments that make them dangers to themselves and the people around them. This relates to my topic because I discuss the temptations of resisting treatment and the importance of treatment for the environmental factors in order for patients to maintain treatment of lithium.

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Mike Ricaurte
Scoop.it!

Association between Job Stress and Insomnia in Korean Workers

This article is about how stress is one of the main causes for insomnia. It focuses on stress that is a result of a job, but it also delves into the personal lives of the people being studied. Factors such as marital status, smoking, drinking, and exercise were analyzed for their effects on sleep.

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Jingxian Zhang
Scoop.it!

China enforces one-child policy through forced abortion, forced sterilization and infanticide

China enforces one-child policy through forced abortion, forced sterilization and infanticide | On the Boundaries of Medicine | Scoop.it

A prime example of a strongly opinated piece made from a biased source (in this case, the organization Women's Rights Without Frontiers) on the situation and enforcement of China's One Child Policy.  While the facts (once filtered out) in this entry are no doubt true, this reference is one I would not recommend for a research paper, but would recommend for something more personal and/or argument based.  In the entry, Ms. Littlejohn attempts to promote awareness and evoke an emotional response from her audience with her pathos and detail of gruesome acts).

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Sterling Gutierrez
Scoop.it!

Psych doctors took money from drug companies to medicate children in juvenile jails

Psych doctors took money from drug companies to medicate children in juvenile jails | On the Boundaries of Medicine | Scoop.it

Psychiatrists at a juvenile center accepted money from pharmaceutical companies. In exchange, they tested pills on children and spoke on behalf of the effectiveness they saw. This is unacceptable and extremely shocking. The federal regulations need to improve and stop all activity such as this.

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Arathi Ponugoti
Scoop.it!

A Unique Look at Nature vs. Nurture

A Unique Look at Nature vs. Nurture | On the Boundaries of Medicine | Scoop.it

In my paper I address the argument of nature versus nurture in determining an individual’s level of intelligence. At one point in my paper I reference the British Eleven Plus, which was a test given to 11 year olds in Britain during the 1950s. This test would determine the pathway for the rest of the child’s life (higher education or trade school) and was based on Sir Cyril Burt’s studies on the similarities between twins that were adopted by different families. Burt’s work was discredited (and the test was gotten rid of) largely in part by the observation that many of the twins studied came from very similar backgrounds (culturally and socio-economically). However the twins in this article are not, this is very interesting and may point to a greater role for genes in detemrining intelligence.

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Jingxian Zhang
Scoop.it!

China's One-Child Policy

China's One-Child Policy | On the Boundaries of Medicine | Scoop.it

This Times article gives a basic introduction to China's One Child Policy, as well as some history and current updates (such as Shanghai's newly modified policy allowing two children under certain conditions).  Interesting points highlighted are the article mentioning the policy relying on "an interesting mix of sticks and carrots" and the succinct paragraph on motives behind government officials currently considering amendments to the policy. 

more...
No comment yet.