OLHS AP Human Geography
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The Population Bomb Has Been Defused

The Population Bomb Has Been Defused | OLHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

Some of the most spectacularly wrong predictions in history have been made by those who claim that overpopulation is going to swamp the planet. Thomas Malthus, a British economist writing in the late 1700s, is the most famous of these. Extrapolating past trends into the future, he predicted that population growth would inevitably swamp available food resources, leading to mass starvation. That didn’t happen -- we continued to develop new technologies that let us stay ahead of the reaper.

 

In 1968, Stanford biologist Paul Ehrlich wrote “The Population Bomb,” warning that unchecked population growth would lead to mass starvation in the 1970s. He was just as wrong as Malthus. Global population did surge, but food production managed to keep up.

 

So far, the prophets of overpopulation have been defeated by technology. But human ingenuity alone can never deliver a final victory in the battle to feed the world -- eventually, population growth will overwhelm the Earth’s ability to provide calories. That’s why in order to put Malthus and Ehrlich finally to rest, a second component is needed -- lower fertility rates. To save both the environment and themselves, humans must have fewer kids.

 

Fortunately, this is happening. During the lifetimes of Malthus and Ehrlich, humans still tended to have large families, with each woman bearing an average of five children over her lifetime. But shortly after Ehrlich’s book, that began to change.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 30, 1:24 PM

Mathusian ideas are incredibly controversial; there are articles that will proclaim that he was right and others that will point to how he got it all wrong.   The critics of Malthus see that Earth and humanity will survive as fertility rates fall almost everywhere but the Neo-Malthusians see that while fertility rates are dropping, the total population of the world continues to climb.  This article has many great fertility rate charts.  

 

Questions to Ponder: What did Malthus get right?  What did he get wrong? 

 

Tags: Malthus, op-ed, demographics, population, APHG, unit 2 population

Laurie Ruggiero's curator insight, May 29, 5:51 PM
Unit 2
Frances Meetze's curator insight, September 10, 1:19 PM
population
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Displacement from Gentrification

Unit 7

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 1, 4:22 PM

How does gentrification displace longtime residents?  How does the community change during the gentrification process?  What are the impacts to residents (current and former) of the gentrification process?  This is one young man's story about gentrification in San Francisco's Mission District. 

 

Tags: neighborhood, gentrificationurban, place, culture, economic

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How ISIS Spread in the Middle East—and How to Stop It

How ISIS Spread in the Middle East—and How to Stop It | OLHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
And how to stop it
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Interesting article. Great background on ISIS.

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Showdown in the South China Sea: How did we get here? - CNN.com

Showdown in the South China Sea: How did we get here? - CNN.com | OLHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Tensions have ratcheted up as the U.S. sent a warship near to Chinese-made artificial islands. But what is at the heart of South China Sea territorial disputes?
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Countries inside Countries (Bizarre Borders Part 1) - YouTube

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More fun with boundaries.

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Inside the $2 billion ISIS war machine

Inside the $2 billion ISIS war machine | OLHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
ISIS is the richest terrorist operation in history. Oil, extortion, taxes and bank looting all play a role. As long as it has land, the Islamic State will have billions of dollars of income.
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Many of you have asked how ISIS is funded. Here's the answer.

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More Mexicans leave than enter USA in historic shift

More Mexicans leave than enter USA in historic shift | OLHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
After four decades of mass migration to the U.S., more Mexicans are now returning home.
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This defiantly a change from the past. As Mexico nears stage four in the DTM many aren't as compelled to migrate.

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Comparing Urban Footprints

Comparing Urban Footprints | OLHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"This is a series of infographics (or geo-infographics) created by Matthew Hartzell, a friend of mine that I met when we were both geography graduate students at Penn State in few years back..."


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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 14, 2014 3:25 PM

This is an interesting way to graph out the urban footprints of various cities from around the world. This also shows how the United States has a number of the largest urban centers in the world. Along the top, New York, Chicago, LA, and Miami are massive compared to cities like Hong Kong. This shows how in the United States there are massive amounts of urban growth. Even in China where their population is one of the worlds biggest, Hong Kong a major city only has 7.1 million. In the United States, for the past century cities have been growing and this graph shows that.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:40 PM

These visuals really help to show that the size of a city doesn't necessarily correspond with it's population. Many years ago the trend was the larger the city in turn it would posses a larger population than a physically smaller city. Today this no longer holds true, in fact many smaller cities vastly out populate large sprawling cities. Most of these mega-cities in Asia and Latin America are incredibly over build and densely packed surrounded by miles of slums. 

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, January 22, 2015 7:16 PM

Pretty cool.

 

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The Great Language Game

The Great Language Game | OLHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Challenge yourself to identify some seventy languages by their sound alone. Learn more about how languages sound and where they're spoken.

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Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 11:59 AM

A game where you can test your knowledge of global tongues only by sound.

The knowledge of languages is important in movement especially for migrants and immigrants and participators in global trade.

Debi Ray Kidd's curator insight, July 21, 2014 4:52 PM

Make sure you look up the languages that you don't know to determine where they're spoken.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 8:20 PM

unit 3-- use in class

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The Root Causes of Food Insecurity

Why are some communities more vulnerable to hunger and famine? There are many reasons, which together add up to food insecurity, the world's no.1 health risk.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 8, 5:07 PM

This video is an excellent summary of the geographic factors that lead to food insecurity and hunger and the main ways NGO's are trying to combat the issues. This is an incredibly complex problem that, at it's heart, is a geographic issue that can challenge student to synthesize information and make the connections between topics.

 

Scoop.it Tags: food, poverty, economic, political, food desert, agriculture, food production.

WordPress TAGS: food, poverty, economic, Political, food desert, agriculture, food production.

Nancy Watson's curator insight, October 12, 10:21 AM
Unit 5 Ag 
Albahae Geography's curator insight, December 4, 11:22 AM
Share your insight
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Map: 'How Much Snow It Typically Takes to Cancel School in the U.S.'

Map: 'How Much Snow It Typically Takes to Cancel School in the U.S.' | OLHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The geography of the snow day, courtesy of Reddit user Alexandr Trubetskoy
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How Do Sunni and Shia Islam Differ?

How Do Sunni and Shia Islam Differ? | OLHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Here is a primer on the differences between the two branches of Islam.
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ISIS’ Territory Shrank in Syria and Iraq This Year

ISIS’ Territory Shrank in Syria and Iraq This Year | OLHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The Islamic State has lost 14 percent of the territory it held in January, according to a new analysis.
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A summary of the gains and losses in territory by ISIS

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The 7 biggest myths about ISIS

The 7 biggest myths about ISIS | OLHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Vox is a general interest news site for the 21st century. Its mission is simple: Explain the news. Politics, public policy, world affairs, pop culture, science, business, food, sports, and everything else that matters are part of our editorial ambit. Our goal is to move people from curiosity to understanding.
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An interesting look at ISIS

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Regional slang words

Regional slang words | OLHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

How many of these 107 regional slang words do you use?  This week on Mental Floss' YouTube information session, author and vlogger John Green explains 107 slang words specific to certain regions.


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Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, January 30, 2015 11:10 AM

This was a neat video.  Many of the slang words that I knew about were touched upon, but many were very new to me.  I never knew the "bubbler" originated in Wisconsin.  I thought that was purely a R.I. thing.  Watching the video made me think of how different regions were originally settled by different ethnicity groups between the early 1600's and 1800's, which almost surely led to these slangs, in my opinion.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 4, 2015 6:55 PM

This was a great video describing what people call different items all over the world.  Just in Rhode Island alone, people from different parts of the state refer to items in different ways.  I think it could have been better if he stuck to the United States only.  Its crazy how different people experience things so close in proximity to each other.  It also would have been great to show how different regions in the U.S. say certain words.  He probably could have made a 30 minute video on that alone and it would have been hilarious.

James Piccolino's curator insight, January 31, 6:41 PM
The link to this doesn't work, but I managed to search it out.Some of these terms are really out there. I thought I knew a lot of these but I was mistaken. One thing I am not surprised by is the fact that I do not follow all of the Rhode Island/ New England lines. I seem to not have an accent like many have here, apparently I can add vocabulary to that list. I actually say many of the terms that go with other areas of the US.
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Hijab: Veiled in Controversy

Hijab: Veiled in Controversy | OLHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Hijab is an Islamic concept of modesty and privacy, most notably expressed in women’s clothing that covers most of the body.

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Norma Ellis's curator insight, September 2, 2013 7:27 AM

 understanding difference

Shelby Porter's comment, September 19, 2013 2:39 PM
The hijab has become a very controversial issue on the global scale. For example, Saudi Arabian and Iran women are required to wear it where as other countries (most recently France) have banned the wearing of such religious garments. Under the U.S. constitutions first amendment of freedom of speech and freedom of religion allows the women to wear them. For many women it is a choice of modesty or a way to show her devotion to her religion. Many people today still are uneducated about the topic and see it as a way these women are being oppressed. Ultimately it is that woman's choice, but it is a shame that in some places it may come with a price.
Mary Rack's comment, September 19, 2013 3:20 PM
Thank you, Shelby!!