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Quest 3 - Samantha Porter - Hospitality

Quest 3 - Samantha Porter - Hospitality | OHS Quests | Scoop.it
Shannon Stone's insight:

Samantha Porter works in hospitality on the Gold Coast. She experiences the OHS factors that were previously discussed in Quest 2 for Hospitality such as, fatigue, working in dull lit areas which can cause eye strain, back, ankle and foot pain, leg strain from standing for long periods of time, PPE and having a healthy diet to help with these factors.

 

WorkCoverNSW promotes a management system called The Six Step Approach. This is similarly outline in the standard AS 4804. The Australian Standard - OHS Management Systems - General guidelines on principles, systems and supporting techniques (AS 4804 - 1997), incorporates five principles which promote continual improvement as part of the organization's overall management system.   

The principles of the AS 4804 are: commitment and policy, planning, implementation, measurement and evaluation and review and improvement.

 

Risk Management is the process used by organisations to identify, assess and control hazards in order to reduce the risk of injury, illness or damage. Risk management is a tool available to all people which, when applied correctly, leads to a safer work environment.

 

Hazard identification, safety audits, workplace inspections, Incident/Accident investigations, records, consultation and health and environment monitoring are all the processes in place to help prevent incidents from happening that will harm any worker.

 

A risk assessment is taken place to see the severity of the hazards that are within the workplace to see if there are any  controls or prevention processes that can be taken place to make sure these incidents do not occur.

 

The following five links are articles based on Risk Management and Risk Analysis within the Hospitality Industry. Is Samantha was to read these articles, they would give her a better indication on how important risk management is within the hospitality industry and will follow to help prevent harm occurring to her workers.

 

The Voice of the Defense Bar, Hotel and Hospitality Risk Management, http://kbrlaw.com/digiacinto1.pdf

 

Inter Continental Hotel Groups, Managing Risks, http://www.ihgplc.com/files/reports/ar2008/index.asp?pageid=32

 

Managing Occ Health and Safety in the Hospitality Business, https://www.safework.sa.gov.au/uploaded_files/hospOHSHospitalitySmallBus.pdf  

 

OHS Reps @ Work, Hospitality, http://www.ohsrep.org.au/ohs-in-your-industry/your-industry-hospitality/hospitality-more-information

 

WorkCoverNSW, Occ Health and Safety in the Hospitality Industry, http://www.workcover.nsw.gov.au/formspublications/publications/Documents/ohs_in_the_hospitality_industry_4133.pdf

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Coal Mining

Coal Mining | OHS Quests | Scoop.it
Shannon Stone's insight:

The coal mining industry is all over Australia and is the main way that we all receive power to our homes. I lived in a small mining town for 5 and a half years called Glenden, everyone who lived here was associated with Newlands Coal - Surface Operations and Underground Operations. Pictured are my friends Robert Bell and Anthony Dionysius. Robert works at Newlands Underground and Anthony works at the local Town Club, he was going for a tour underground to have an insight on what it was like to work there. As you can see, working underground will make yourself very dirty as this is because the coal being cut underground has dust particles flying around everywhere, this is also a hazard as the particles can be harmful  to the respiratory system and eyes. This can also happen at Surface Operations but because the miners aren't underground its less likely to happen. There are breathing apparatus' in place in case of an emergency.

 PPE is used in both mines, safety glasses, ear plugs, high vis clothing, bright coloured shirts, hard hats and safety boots.

Fatigue is a major factor within OHS due to the long hours the miners work, usually they are about 12 hour long shifts during the day, afternoon or night. The weather can also affect work, cold weather can cause more sicknesses during night shifts, heatstroke during dayshifts if the miners are not keeping up with their fluids etc. Driving to and from work after a long shift can also be risking the lives of themselves and other people on the same road as the fatigued miners.

Coal mining has many OHS factors that are maintained and enforced by the Acts and Regulations. Many training courses and mining rules are also enforced in order to follow and not breach the Acts and Regulations associated with coal mining.

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Lisa Tonkin's comment, July 27, 2014 11:19 PM
It's a small world Shannon - I lived in Glenden for 4 years too :)
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Cane Farming

Cane Farming | OHS Quests | Scoop.it
Shannon Stone's insight:

Sugar cane grows in warm, sunny, frost-free weather. Proserpine, where this photo was taken, is where my friend Kirby Clark lives with her family. Her dad is president of the cane farmers association and owns a cane farm just outside of Proserpine. It takes 12-16 months for sugarcane to mature, between June and December is when farmers harvest their cane, this is when the rainfall is less frequent and when the plant's sugar content is at its highest. Traditionally, the cane was burnt to remove all their leaves and weeds before harvesting and milling, but nowadays farmers just harvest the cane as it recycles nitrogen in the plant by leaving trash cuttings from harvesting in the field, plus it is also better for the air quality for surrounding neighbours and towns. Cane farming uses many different machines as well as a mill for the process of cane to turn into sugar. These machines give off gas emissions which get put into the air, this is another effect that's happening to the ozone layer as we speak. There is also the effect of fatigue by the farmer as early mornings planting and maintaining the fields before the midday sun comes in can lead to tiring days and long exposed times in direct sunlight. Heatstroke can occur, which can lead to fainting, high risk of skin cancer etc. There is also the hazard of insects compromising the cane with their bodies and how they live, their faeces or their bodies can be left on the cane and it can infect or contaminate the final product.

Kirby helps her father in any way she can from harvesting to planting the cane, early hours and long days are what she does to help her dad grow some of the best sugar North Queensland produces.

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Hospitality

Hospitality | OHS Quests | Scoop.it
Shannon Stone's insight:

The Hospitality industry is a very huge part of the world as it gives people restaurants to eat at and places to have some beverages with family and friends.

The OHS factors for hospitality include fatigue, working in dull lit areas, back pain, leg strain from standing and walking around for long hours.

RSA and RSG are two main competencies a person has to have before working within hospitality as well as the knowledge of food safety and handling. Pictured are my former work colleagues/friends Samantha Porter, Taneisha Waerea and Mark Anthony enjoying some eggnog during the Christmas season.

It is appropriate to wear enclosed shoes that will help support the feet, ankles and legs due to the amount of hours you stand in the bar. The lighting within the bar is always dull lit, this strains the bar attendants eyes to help them see better, this can lead to headaches and eye strain which can then lead to complications later on in life with their sight.

Having a healthy diet whilst working in this environment can give off the energy needed to stay awake as well as keeping the meal intakes more healthy than just eating deep fried food you will get from the kitchen.

The bar and bistro areas also need to be clean in order to continue serving food and beverages, cleaning checklists are being enforced in hospitality venues to help maintain the cleanliness the venues need.

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Motocross

Motocross | OHS Quests | Scoop.it
Shannon Stone's insight:

Motocross riding can be a professional or a recreational environment. Pictured is my friend Josh Blackburn, bike #368, he races within clubs and travels around Queensland to race against other in his class. Protective gear is the main PPE in motocross such as a helmet, goggles, neck brace, chest protector, undergear shorts, knee braces, moto socks and motorcycle boots. Mental preparation needs to be done before a race as well, knowledge of the how the track goes, the three C's (clarity, confidence and commitment,) planning the first two or three laps within the race will also help mentally on what you will do within the race.

Being fit and healthy is also a very important factor when riding motorbikes, moving, jumping and whipping the bike around whilst in the air and going around sharp corners involves a lot of muscle and cardio work. The heat is also another factor for OHS too, riding all day in the sun with all the protective gear can result in heatstroke and can lead the rider to faint and be very severely dehydrated. Water fluids must be kept up, camel packs are usually used within racing in order for the riders to still maintain their fluids.

Motocross is dangerous and can lead to severe accidents leaving riders injured for long periods of times sometimes permanent damage occurs as well. Following the safety rules that the motocross clubs enforce and maintaining a positive mental health as well as a healthy, active lifestyle, the risks can be reduced.

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Horse Riding - OHS

Horse Riding - OHS | OHS Quests | Scoop.it
Shannon Stone's insight:

Horse riding is a very active environment as there are horses galloping, trotting, jumping etc. People also have to be in good shape to ride a horse as it uses a lot of muscles in the body to stay on the horse and ride. This could lead to fatigue as working out and waking up early to feed the horses and take care of them uses energy. This can also cause accidents such as a person falling off a horse if the horse is in distress or not in a good mood to be riding, this can also lead to fatigue in the horse as well. Many long days practicing and competing can be tiring for both horse and rider, a routine should be set out for the horse and rider so that exercise and practice is adapted within their lifestyle. Healthy foods and large amounts of water should also be within the diet of both horse and rider so that their fatigue levels are low throughout the day. The weather is also a hazard with this environment, if its cold or wet, the horse and the rider (if riding outside) can be prone to getting a cold or in worst cases potentially very ill. This can effect the status of the rider and the horse if they want to compete in a competition or practice for one. The picture inserted is of my friend Jordie Schuurmann, she lives a very active lifestyle, eats healthy and works out regularly to help stay fit for herself as well as for her riding, she practices with her horses almost every day of the week and makes sure they are fed with the healthiest foods and makes sure they have plenty of shelter and rest once practice is complete. She has had many wins and her love for horses will continue as she progresses further in this environment.    

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Nicholas Harvie's curator insight, August 16, 2015 9:41 PM

In regards to a previous Scoop (High Riders) this article mentions physical requirements of a horse rider and outlines some basic hazards and risks that go in with in the horse riding environment.