OHS Quest in Mining, Construction and Oil & Gas Industry
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Too many are dying in mining accidents - Northern Star

Too many are dying in mining accidents - Northern Star | OHS Quest in Mining, Construction and Oil & Gas Industry | Scoop.it
Too many are dying in mining accidents
Northern Star
TOO MANY mine workers are being killed on Australian operations and too many of those are contractors.
Nicholas Rowland's insight:

It is apparent that health and safety procedures in Australian mines need to be reviewed in order to decrease the amount of deaths in the industry.  It was interesting to find that contractors were most at risk and had the highest number of deaths on Australian mines.  Are they receiving efficient safety inductions and made aware of the procedures used on the site?  Although regarded as speicalists and used for specific work, they too are required to be made aware of all safety practices just as apprentices and new workers are required to go through an induction.  Whatever the cause may be, a review into the safety procedures used on Australian mines needs critical assessment and modifcation.

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Lyle Dighton's curator insight, March 14, 2014 8:35 AM

An insufficient knowledge of OHS practices and standards is why the mining industry is claiming the mentioned fatalities. Ongoing safety awareness training and education should be made more available for mining personnel to utilise. Another method of preventing deaths could also involve safety professionals working with personnel more often than against them (working together to achieve effective safety outcomes).

Mark Brodie's curator insight, August 3, 2015 9:17 PM

An insufficient knowledge of OHS practices and standards is why the mining industry is claiming the mentioned fatalities. Ongoing safety awareness training and education should be made more available for mining personnel to utilise. Another method of preventing deaths could also involve safety professionals working with personnel more often than against them (working together to achieve effective safety outcomes).

lee matthews's curator insight, March 15, 2017 4:56 AM
In the future I would love to work on a mine site, and yes as the article states "they are dangerous". However with proper training and education around procedures and equipment this can be drastically minimised. But..... what if this was not the case due to need or indeed duty of care. This article particularly touches base with me as I have been in the civil industry for some time and seen what poorly arranged and ill equipped contracts and  labour hire can do. Traditionally you would start with a company and be taught from the ground up. You would care for your employees and take them from job to job where applicable. This meant that you knew their skill levels, what they were capable of and also most importantly their level of training as it was done "in house". I personally believe this created "all round" workers with solid foundations of knowledge. It also gave the worker a sense of security and longer term purpose, to which the worker would return in loyalty and knowledge obtained over time of employment.
With the introduction of labour hire and contractors into a highly competitive and often profitable environment this changed, I believe for the worst. Jobs once again became about profit and as a result machine maintenance, employee education, job stability and pay rates diminished while keeping the mirage that production and profits were all on track. Yet workplace accidents rose? So who is to blame? Surely not the principle contractor who head hunted the cheapest contract... what about the embattled contractor who didn't read the fine lines in his contract and is battling to meet deadline, find operators and stay afloat? Should jobs then be won from a safety stand point? Would that not promote companies to cover up incidents in order to win contracts?  I might not know the answer to these question but ,I sure know who ends up suffering until we get it right. Me and you the humble worker who just wants food on the table and to see their family EVERY night.
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10 Commandments of Workplace Safety

It doesn't matter if you're in an office, factory, on a construction site, in a foundry, in storage, transport or in retail. The 10 Commandments of Workplace...
Nicholas Rowland's insight:

Something that all workers should consider when in the workplace.  Health and safety is not just about the individual person but rather everyones concern and responsibility.  The actions and decisions an individual may make can have serious consequences on other within the area.  Essential points highlighted in this video and can relate to many practices.

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Ten Victorian tradies injured every day - Worksafe News

Ten Victorian tradies injured every day - Worksafe News | OHS Quest in Mining, Construction and Oil & Gas Industry | Scoop.it
Ten tradies are injured badly enough every day to make a compensation claim, according to statistics released today by WorkSafe. In the past five year...

Via ChrisatKangan
Nicholas Rowland's insight:

Interesting statistics on Australian construction workers.  Changing the attitudes of workers towards health and safety is essential as it encourages workers to identify and report hazards to management by their own accord.  A change in the workers attitude towards OH&S will lead to the decrease in these injury statistics across the Australian construction industry.

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Our loved ones died at unsafe workplaces

Nicholas Rowland's insight:

Although not directly related to my desired career path, this video summarises the results of poor health and safety systems.  This is why I chose to take this career path, in the hope to prevent families losing loved ones from earning an income.  Everyone should be able to go to their workplace feeling safe and I hope that by studying this course and entering this field of work that I am able to make an impact on reducing workplace accidents and fatalities.

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Built on Bones Qatar World Cup construction workers die daily|NewsDay

Built on Bones: Qatar World Cup construction workers die daily ... www.youtube.com/watch?v=vRXktlS4OOA... - Traduzir esta página 20 horas atrás - 2022 World ...
Nicholas Rowland's insight:

How is it that in this modern era of construction and the implementation of health and safety laws, that building companies such as this one in Qatar are operating in such dangerous and inhuman ways?  At least one worker a day dies on this construction site, and I believe this would largely be due to the lack of funding put towards health and safety methods.  Futhermore, the fact that workers are being exhausted and overwhelmed with the physical demands, fatigue also increases workplace injuries and deaths.  However, the construction boom Qatar is currently experiencing gives workers no choice as it provides an income for a struggling community.

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Worker suing UGL after being injured - Australian Mining

Worker suing UGL after being injured - Australian Mining | OHS Quest in Mining, Construction and Oil & Gas Industry | Scoop.it
Worker suing UGL after being injured
Australian Mining
A boilermaker is suing UGL for close to $2 million after being injured at the Ensham coal mine.
Nicholas Rowland's insight:

This article highlights the fact that it only takes one minor hazard to end a career and life of working for good.  Also reinforces that workers should take responsibilty for identifying hazards and being safety conscious when working as it is often others who suffer from poor safety decisions.  Both the company and worker suffer from a loss as a result.  Health and safety matters, act in the present to prevent regret in the future!

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Compilation _ Heavy Equipment Fails

Nicholas Rowland's insight:

The use of heavy machinery is essential on most sites, which is why it is important to have workers that know how to operate them.  Here's how NOT to operate heavy equipment... Health and safety getting an absolute workout!

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Exxon Ignored Safety Risks in Lead-up to 200,000 Gallon Oil Spill

Exxon Ignored Safety Risks in Lead-up to 200,000 Gallon Oil Spill | OHS Quest in Mining, Construction and Oil & Gas Industry | Scoop.it
Federal regulators investigating a crude oil spill in Arkansas have concluded that in the years before the accident, pipeline owner ExxonMobil dragged its feet on critical repairs and inspections, ignored evidence that the pipeline was disposed to failure, and cherry-picked data to downplay the risk of an accident.

Via Gary Yarus
Nicholas Rowland's insight:

Taking the risk to ignore critical assessments made on the use of Exxon's faulty pipeline has lead the company to face a fine of $2.66 million for the 210 000 gallon oil spill in Arkansas.  Once again, poor risk management decisions were made despite being fully aware that the possibility of the disaster occuring was great.  To work in this industry it is obvious that by ignoring risk management processes, the consequences and repercussions are devastating to the community and environment.  Companies can minimise the risk of these accidents occuring and avoid both financial and legal liability, which in my opinion is much more beneficial.

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'Construction Crane Collapse' (TEN News November 2012)

It's 10am in busy Ultimo. Suddenly thousands of university students and neighbouring construction workers hear the sudden crash of a crane, collapsing throug...
Nicholas Rowland's insight:

Evidence that workplace accidents can happen anytime, anywhere!  This accident reinforces that not only are workers at risk, but the surrounding community also which is why all organisations and workplaces need efficient health and safety systems.  Evacuation plans were put into action during this incident at both the construction site and the university the crane inevitably landed on.  Students within the university were unaware they needed to evacuate and were in danger of sustaining serious injuries.  The attitude towards OHS needs to be taken seriously before incidents occur rather than after.

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Botched blast at BHP Mt Arthur coal mine - SafeToWork

Botched blast at BHP Mt Arthur coal mine - SafeToWork | OHS Quest in Mining, Construction and Oil & Gas Industry | Scoop.it
Sydney Morning Herald Botched blast at BHP Mt Arthur coal mine SafeToWork EPA investigators are currently looking into effects of a botched blast at Mount Arthur Mine last Wednesday, which caused toxic fumes to spread several kilometres from the...
Nicholas Rowland's insight:

Interesting incident involving a highly recognised mining company being BHP Billiton.  I found this article closely related to the incidents that occurred in Bhopal, India disaster, however to a much smaller scale.  Once again toxic fumes were released into the air affecting not only the workers of the coal mine, but ultimately impacting the Mt Arthur community.  The question of whether risk management systems were used could also be raised.  Was the decision to keep the explosive material in the ground longer than the recommened time period in order to prevent water contamination the safest option?  Clearly not!  This is not the first time BHP have been involved this particular type of incident and therefore raises serious risk assessment concerns.

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