OHS Quest 2
123 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Nirvana Stewart
Scoop.it!

Laws - Workplace Health and Safety Queensland

In order to understand the workplace health and safety requirements for diving and your obligations under the law you must understand relevant Acts, regulations and codes of practice.
Nirvana Stewart's insight:

This is a key resource for risk management and prevention guidance that will assist Andre to manage the OHS issues in his environment. This web site outlines essential resources that a person conducting general diving work should be familiar with to understand the duties and safety requirements when operating an occupational diving business in Queensland. It further outlines regulation requirements; compliance checklists and specific advise on operational aspects, risk assessments and emergency management plans. This information is crucial to enable him as the operator to meet the requirements of legislation by developing a framework for a safe and healthy workplace. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nirvana Stewart
Scoop.it!

AS/NZS 2299.1:2007 Occupational diving operations - Standard operational practice

Nirvana Stewart's insight:

SAI is a global organisation that provides current, relevant, information on risk management and compliance. The AS/NZS 2299.1:2007 Occupational diving operations - Standard operational practice is specific to the occupational diving operation that Andre operates. This document provides logistical and organizational requirements for underwater operations and the specific use of self contained breathing apparatus (SCUBA) that is routinely used by Andre in his workplace. Information specific to the requirements of procedures, equipment and personnel that is found within this document would be very useful when developing a strategic plan for management and reviewing of occupational health and safety issues within his operation. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nirvana Stewart
Scoop.it!

utc - The Product - Communication

utc - The Product - Communication | OHS Quest 2 | Scoop.it
Communication
Nirvana Stewart's insight:

Communication between divers while performing a task underwater is currently limited to direct contact reliant on visual queues that require both divers to remain in contact with one another. Task related hazards include buddy separation, hose entanglement, emergency contact with pontoon, vessel or structure. There is no capacity for divers in these identified hazardous situations to communicate with one another. Current practice is for the surface supervisor to initiate emergency diver recall procedures by starting the engine of the vessel that we are operating under. In doing so this alerts the divers to immediately activate their emergency recall procedure. Starting the engines overrides controls that are in place to prevent the propellers being engaged whilst a diver is working on the vessel. This action is identified as a major risk resulting in serious injury or loss of life. Alternative recall methods that are employed by recreational operators are not effective in this setting. 

 

The Underwater Technologies Centre (UTC) wrist mounted communication devise could be a viable alternative that would allow for limited communication between all in water divers and supervisory staff on the surface. This device would overcome delays in communication in the event of an emergency. Such as where the individual divers are performing tasks outside of each others visual fields and are unaware of the others welfare for periods of time. Divers could activate alerts from their UTC that could provide life saving information by alerting other team members that their safety has been compromised. It is not an infallible solution but would be superior to the current practice. Not to undervalue how cool it is and the street cred either!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nirvana Stewart
Scoop.it!

The Boss!!!

The Boss!!! | OHS Quest 2 | Scoop.it
Nirvana Stewart's insight:

Andre is the owner operator of a commercial scuba diving business. Daily operations are conducted in a hostile environment with a high potential for harm or injury. Where the possibility of injury has a moderate to catastrophic consequence. The work task is a strenuous and repetitive action with high demands. Often conducted in a confined space, with limited visibility, restricted access and egress.

 

Andre is routinely exposed to chemical, biological, ergonomic and physical hazards. Where there is a risk of cuts, musculoskeletal injury, infection, burns, crush injury, amputation, fatigue, entrapment and SCUBA diving related injuries or illness such as the bends or decompression illness.

 

Positive or negative exposure to temperatures and light resulting in acute presentations of sunburn or hypothermia and long-term illness from UV exposure.

 

Dangerous marine animals have the potential to cause severe personal injury or chronic illness.

 

Vessel loading can have a negative impact on vessel stability and movement of load whilst travelling causing damage or injury to person or plant.

 

Physical injury from prolonged operation of vessel in moderate to adverse conditions.

 

Due to the nature of the work and remote work environment a control failure can cause serious injury to person, plant or environment. Constant vigilance is required. Currency in water escape training, evacuation, aeromedical retrieval, and confined space training are mandatory requirements for this occupation.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nirvana Stewart
Scoop.it!

Andy likes it dirty!

Andy likes it dirty! | OHS Quest 2 | Scoop.it
Nirvana Stewart's insight:

Andy Wilson has been a recreational cross-country mountain biker for 22 years. He takes a sensible and well-practiced approach to safety in this activity of choice. Andy considers the following to be reasonable health and safety considerations for each mountain biking adventure.

 

He says that it is essential for riders to have a basic knowledge of bike repairs. To always check the bike before commencing a ride, looking for obvious damage and worn parts.

 

To plan the route in advance, informing someone of the intended route, including an expected returning time. The plan should also accommodate the slowest or least inexperienced in the group.

 

Each rider should wear appropriate protection. Including a helmet, gloves, glasses and armour or guards to suit the intended ride. They should also carry a repair and spares pack containing spare tubes, tools and a first aid kit. Each rider should carry enough water, food and protective clothing appropriate to conditions.

 

Andy thinks riders need to take responsibility for their own safety as much as possible. He says to do that riders need to ride within their ability and need to know their limitations.

 

Andy maintains that Mountain biking involves continuous and ongoing risk assessment throughout a ride. Starting with comprehensive planning and preparation. Then continuing throughout the ride by looking for, and identifying hazards on the trails and how to overcome them. All of which occurs in a split second and requires constant vigilance/awareness.

 

Hazards and Injuries

 

Generally the more technical the trail and the faster you go, the more likely you are to loose control and crash or fall off. Though, don't be complacent as serious injuries can still occur at low speed and on easy terrain.

 

Hazards to look out for include trees, low lying branches, wait-a-while, big rocks, drop offs, wet muddy terrain, wet roots, creek crossings, wet rocks, animals, other riders and washed out tracks. Really the list is endless.

 

Injures sustained from collision, impact or falling from height causing gravel rash, fractures, lacerations, haematomas, dislocations, head injuries, unconsciousness, paralysis or puncture wounds. Exposure causing heat exhaustion, hypothermia and dehydration.

 

All of the above injuries, conditions and hazards should continually be considered when mountain biking 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nirvana Stewart
Scoop.it!

occupational-diving-work-cop-2005.pdf

Nirvana Stewart's insight:

The Occupational Diving Work Code of Practice is an approved code of practice under the Work Health and Safety Act 2011. This code provides Andre with a practical guide in how to attain and maintain the expected standards of health and safety by operators within the occupational diving industry. The development of these industry standards along with their subsequent implementation, compliance and monitoring, has seen an observable improvement in the safety profile of this industry. These resources are freely available with the expectation that operators such as Andre would adopt these as best practice. It is Andre’s duty as the person conducting the business to ensure that the recommendations and mandatory requirements within this code are met through an ongoing process of consultation and compliance.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nirvana Stewart
Scoop.it!

Scuba Diving Medical Safety Advice — DAN | Divers Alert Network

Scuba Diving Medical Safety Advice — DAN | Divers Alert Network | OHS Quest 2 | Scoop.it
DAN - Divers Alert Network is a nonprofit scuba diving and dive safety association providing expert medical advice for underwater injuries, emergencies, and insurance.
Nirvana Stewart's insight:

The Divers Alert Network (DAN) is a well recognised and reputed as the most respected association committed to scuba diving safety globally. They provide education, research, medical information, dive accident insurance and resources to all interested persons within the diving community. This is an open access site that provides expert knowledge and opinions offering insights into incidence prevention and the management of emergency processes pertaining to scuba diving. Valuable research investigates general dive safety and topics of interest to all divers. The Divers Alert Network holds workshops for industry experts and interested parties to share knowledge and provides education courses for recreational divers, diving professionals and health care providers alike. Not only Andre but I should think that affiliation with this association for any diving professional would be wise as it entitles the user 24hr access to DAN’s emergency medical hotline to access information, evacuation and care coordination. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nirvana Stewart
Scoop.it!

My Hero Dan

My Hero Dan | OHS Quest 2 | Scoop.it
Nirvana Stewart's insight:

Dan Campbell-Lloyd is an extreme sports super hero who after 15 yrs. as a professional athlete has transitioned from the lime light to that of a position of comfort behind the camera. From a position of relative safety on the sideline, this role has enables him to continue in the spirit of adventure. This journey has taken him around the world ten fold. Enabling him to capturing images of an elite few, who are pioneers of extreme sports and are at the top of their game. From the giddy heights of the Alaskan Big Mountains to the white water of the Nile. It’s a fast life with a very high price.

 

Big Mountain filming

 

Avalanches, heli crashes and exposures are constant considerations on all mountain ski trips. Dan considers the elements to be the most common risk as the weather can change quickly. A change of weather at these altitudes can be severe and life threatening very quickly.  Avalanches are the highest concern when filming in big mountains. A lot of time, energy and technology are spent on analyzing the snow conditions. Dan says that the team will abandon a shoot if the base is not stable. A lot of training is conducted with beacons and recovery techniques before each trip.

 

 

White water kayaking

 

The inherent danger is in the medium, the water itself. Kayakers are at a high risk of drowning. In smaller water courses kayakers can be pinned under a rock or tree by a strong current. They can be knocked unconscious and held under. Often in a place that is difficult to access. Sometimes it is impossible. Big water like the Nile has strong undertows and whirlpools that suck both kayaker and kayak under. Pulling them further and further down for an unknown time. Then releasing them to be washed up further down stream, often with poor outcomes.

 

Dan says that big water like the Nile has other threats. Such as the local wildlife, cranky hippos, hungry crocodiles, massive snakes and mosquitos which carry Malaria. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nirvana Stewart
Scoop.it!

Skipper Joel

Skipper Joel | OHS Quest 2 | Scoop.it
Nirvana Stewart's insight:

Joel Hitchcock is a Master Class 4 Skipper for Queensland Marine Nation Parks. He has been driving boats for over 10 years and is the senior skipper for the Cairns Marine Parks operation. While the vessel is under his command, he is ultimately responsible for the safe operation of the vessel, its passengers and crew. Joel has a comprehensive understanding of the hazards and risks within his workplace and the control measures that are implemented to manage those risks.

 

While operating in this capacity Joel states that constant vigilance is necessary to minimize incidence of harm or injury. His workplace environment is rarely predictable and can change significantly with little warning.

 

Considerations include:

 

Vessel loading can have negative impacts of vessel stability or the movement of load whilst travelling can cause damage or injury to person, plant or vessel.

 

Berthing has the potential to crushed fingers, cause amputations or impact injuries from parting lines.

 

Collision/grounding result in injury to people, damage/ loss of vessel, damage to environment, financial loss and damage to reputation.

 

Vessel pounding whilst underway can cause physical injury from prolonged operation of vessel in moderate to adverse conditions.

 

Electrical system failure can cause physical injury, vessel incapacitation, damage to vessel systems and equipment or loss of communication.

 

Exposure to hazardous substances can cause physical injury/illness, death.

 

Radiation exposure from RADAR and other associated electronic equipment, causing physical injury/medical conditions.

 

Fire or explosion causing injury to people, death, damage to vessel, and/or environment, damage to reputation and financial loss.

 

Manual tasks causing physical injury short or long term

 

Abandon ship or capsizing causing death, physical injury and loss of vessel.

 

Person overboard with the potential for drowning.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nirvana Stewart
Scoop.it!

Lights and Sirens!!!

Lights and Sirens!!! | OHS Quest 2 | Scoop.it
Nirvana Stewart's insight:

Nicole Morton has been working as an Advanced Care Paramedic with the Queensland Ambulance Service for the past 5 years. Paramedics are health care professionals who provide medical care at an advanced life support level in the pre-hospital environment, usually in an emergency, to people with an illness or injury. Nicole says that ‘Being a paramedic is a very rewarding job. Each day brings new challenges and I consider it a privilege that we are welcomed into patients homes and entrusted to administer often life-saving pre-hospital care”. However, in doing so paramedics are exposed to numerous hazards.

 

Biological Hazards

 

Through close contact or the transportation of a patient suffering from a simple flu exposes the paramedic to the risk of contracting the illness. If the patient requires fluids or medication, the paramedic will administer intramuscular injections or obtain intravenous access. Both these procedures carry the risk of sharps injury and exposure to blood. Standard practice is for Paramedics to use appropriate Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). Disposable gloves must be worn when assessing and treating all patients, and safety glasses are to be used when obtaining IV access or if the paramedic suspects there is potential for mucous contact via patient spitting etc.

Correct hand washing techniques before and after patient contact is considered good practice.

 

Fatigue

 

Paramedics work a minimum of 10-12 hours per shift, with a combination of day, afternoon and night rotations. Operational demands mean that paramedics routinely respond to case after case, frequently missing meal breaks and with little opportunity to manage fatigue.

 

Paramedics are required to make critical treatment decisions that can be life saving at any time of day. When responding to such cases they are required to drive at high speed with lights and sirens in an effort to make best time. These decisions and actions are complicated by lack of sleep, rest or food breaks. Fatigue management is an ongoing concern for practioner’s in the field of emergency medicine.

 

 

Musculoskeletal Injuries

 

Paramedics undertake a lot of physical activity throughout their shift. Many patients are too sick to mobilise on their own and require assistance or to be lifted onto the stretcher for transport. These manouvres; along with the repetitive loading and unloading of the stretcher from the ambulance, places the paramedic at increased risk of injury to joints and muscles Emphasis is placed on positioning and posture during each case. Safe manual handling techniques are an integral part of safe work practices.

 

Increasing numbers of obese patients are consistent with current health trends. These patients present an increased risk of musculoskeletal injuries to paramedics when mobilizing or lifting them. In an effort to minimize harm or injury, specific equipment such as stretchers, stair chairs and walk belts are used by ambulance services to perform these tasks. However, current workplace systems are inadequate for eliminating these risks entirely. The onus is on the practicing paramedic to exercise their judgment of the best practice for manual handling techniques in an effort to minimize harm.

 

more...
No comment yet.