OHS Quest 2 & 3
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Ten-pin bowler slips, slides - and sues Mt Gambier City Bowl

Ten-pin bowler slips, slides - and sues Mt Gambier City Bowl | OHS Quest 2 & 3 | Scoop.it
A TENPIN bowler is suing the former owners of a Mt Gambier bowling alley, claiming unsafe hire shoes and a slippery lane caused him to fall heavily.
Cath Myrtvedt's insight:

Here's an example of probably the most common injury type related to bowling - slips and falls. This man slipped whilst bowling, dislocated fingers, required surgery and was left with a multitude of problems as a result. The man in question is suing because he thinks the area was too slippery and the owners claim he should have known bowling alleys are 'inherently slippery'.

 

This is an excellent example of safety and assumptions and how they do not work together. If you have safety procedures that assumes the people using them possess certain basic knowledge or common sense you are almost guaranteed to fail. Not everyone will be aware of how slippery the bowling areas can be, especially if they have never been bowling before. Not everyone will know that you are not at all supposed to step onto the lane, in fact some people intentionally do so in order to get closer to the pins and as such get better aim. Things that may seem obvious to one person is not necessarily so to another, all sorts of factors come into play and people rarely have the same experiences to draw from and, as a result, things that are assumed to be common knowledge may be the things that causes accidents that perhaps should not have happened.

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MachineSAFE

MachineSAFE | OHS Quest 2 & 3 | Scoop.it
machineSAFE: Machine Safety training in Australia and New Zealand. Learn how to use the machine safety standard for Australia and New Zealand, AS4024.1-2006.
Cath Myrtvedt's insight:

This is company that offers information, courses and training relating to machine operation complying with safety standards for Australia and New Zealand. All work places using machinery have an opportunity to teach staff and, to an extent, clients how to safely and appropriately use equipment before an accident happens. Getting a risk assessment and controls in place early is vital to manage hazardous situations and avoid accidents. 

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Elf & safety strikes again: £250,000 study to tell us ten-pin bowling is dangerous

Elf & safety strikes again: £250,000 study to tell us ten-pin bowling is dangerous | OHS Quest 2 & 3 | Scoop.it
Experts concluded that it was too easy for children or teenagers to run down lanes and get trapped in machinery that sets up the pins - even though it had never happened.
Cath Myrtvedt's insight:

As suspected it is found that attending a bowling alley can in fact pose certain dangers, this article highlights the wrong way to look at safety and is perhaps an example of why not everyone thinks OH&S is a serious discipline. Suggesting to put up barriers to prevent accidents that is yet to happen is just as ridiculous as it sounds and is not how safety concerns should be addressed.  

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Kirsti - Specialist Nurse

Kirsti - Specialist Nurse | OHS Quest 2 & 3 | Scoop.it

Kirsti is a nurse and deals with possible infections, bio hazards and slippery floors on a daily basis.

Cath Myrtvedt's insight:

This is my mother, Kirsti. She is the head specialist nurse at the eye clinic at a university hospital. As the head department nurse she operates more behind the scenes than a normal nurse, but she is not unaware of the OHS issues that appear in her workplace.

 

One of the most common issues is being stung by a needle. It may have contaminated blood on it, it may have been used in an infected patient, it may have been used to clean out a wound or put in a drip. This constant exposure to bio hazards cause strict safety routines to be in place, but accidents still occur.

 

There are also chemicals and toxic waste on a daily basis that must be addressed properly to avoid contamination or infections to other patients or staff. There are detailed procedures in place to avoid accidents and special disposal systems in place to control the situation.

 

Kirsti says the floors are very slippery and because of this most of the staff use rubber shoes (Crocs are the big favourite…). This is a bigger issue when it rains and people enter the clinic with wet shoes or have umbrellas that drip all over the floor.

 

There is a lot of equipment in all the examination rooms and sometimes in the hallways; these can be heavy to move and when stationary you can easily trip over them if you are distracted. 

 

The patients themselves can pose a challenge as well. Some can be mentally unstable and you risk being kicked, hit or bitten when treating them. Moving patients from one bed to another, or from a bed to a wheelchair or just helping them out of a chair can be very heavy and cause back injuries for the nurses. 

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Caroline - Bowling Alley Attendant

Caroline - Bowling Alley Attendant | OHS Quest 2 & 3 | Scoop.it

Caroline works at a bowling alley and deals with hazards like slipping, being burnt or gettingher hand stuck in a machine on a daily basis.

Cath Myrtvedt's insight:

This is my sister, Caroline. She works at a bowling alley and before talking to her I didn’t think bowling would offer many issues in relation to OHS. It seems I was wrong. Every day the lanes at the bowling alley needs to be oiled before they can open for the day. These lanes are very slippery and offer a massive risk in slipping and falling over and consequently injury. This is also an issue if a bowling ball gets stuck in or behind the machine and she needs to manually get it out. If this happens she needs to go behind the machine (over parts of the oiled, slippery lane) and dislodge the ball with her hand. Doing this can get her hand stuck, should things go wrong.

 

Patrons to the bowling alley, especially kids, sometimes walk onto the lane. If they get close enough they can, in a worst case scenario, actually get caught in the machine that collects the pins after every bowl and get dragged down with it. If this happens the only way to stop it is by manually hitting an emergency stop button. Another threat to the patrons is getting fingers caught between balls that are returned on the carousel, or dropping the balls on feet etc.

 

Behind the counter Caroline prepares food when the orders come in, which of course presents its own set of obstacles. There are pizza ovens, a deep fryer, a grill and a coffee machine, all with the capacity to burn and injure the operator. She also prepares salads and toppings for hamburgers with a knife and the patrons are given cutlery, all of which can cause injury under the right circumstances. 

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Bowling alley accident averted as worker saves boy

Bowling alley accident averted as worker saves boy | OHS Quest 2 & 3 | Scoop.it
A Wisconsin bowing alley employee's quick reaction Sunday saved a toddler from serious injury after he was pulled into a ball return machine, The (Eau Claire) Leader-Telegram reports.
Cath Myrtvedt's insight:

Learning about the risks involved with bowling one of the things that shocked me the most was the possibility of being pulled into the machine that collects and replaces the pins. Although a rare event, the possibility alone scares me quite a lot and I am baffled that no one has managed to invent a sensor that can differentiate between a pin and a human being so that the machine is not activated if anything but a pin is located in the area. Knowing that my sister has to get in close contact with these machines on a daily basis emphasizes the importance of being aware of personal safety and how important it is to be mindful of your surroundings and how they operate, especially during busy times when things are done in a rush. 

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Bowling alley technician killed

Bowling alley technician killed | OHS Quest 2 & 3 | Scoop.it
Surreal
Cath Myrtvedt's insight:

A simple mistake of forgetting to unplug equipment can have serious consequences. An experienced team leader was crushed to death when cleaning a machine at a bowling alley after triggering an active sensor. A full risk assessment of the establishment could have prevented the accident . Safety procedures for maintenance and repairs of equipment was changed nationally (UK) and although a sad outcome in this particular case, the overall improvements in the industry should be seen as a positive. 

 

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Arne - Crane Operator Offshore

Arne - Crane Operator Offshore | OHS Quest 2 & 3 | Scoop.it
Cath Myrtvedt's insight:

 

This is my dad, Arne. He used to spend is days working on an oil rig offshore for weeks at the time. Working on an oil rig presents so many dangers and OHS issues; pretty much everything will have very serious consequences should things go wrong.

 

Arne used to crane operator, and every so often they would get supply boats come out to the oil rig with big containers that would need to be moved from the boats to the deck of the rig. The magnitude of this operation in itself is dangerous, and when you add in waves, wind, a moving boat and a swaying crane the OHS issues are monumental. The crane sits about 60 meters above the deck and the supply boats sits about 60 meters below the deck. To get the container onto the deck Arne would have to lower a hook down to the supply boat, have the hook securely attached by someone on the boat and lift the container onto the deck. With waves and wind swinging the container around this operation can be very dangerous, and being hit or trapped by the container would result in horrific injuries to any person or machinery involved. Overload on the crane and the actual process of securing the hook from the supply boat are two of the most critical points to this particular scenario. Lowering the hook below the deck makes it a blind zone with very limited visibility, so controlling the crane is done based on radio contact with the supply boat and the assistant crane operator on the deck. If communication breaks down between any of the parties involves the outcome could be catastrophic.

 

Other issues on an oil rig is simply getting to and from work. To get there you use a helicopter and take-off and landing successfully is very weather dependent. A storm can cause massive disruptions to most operations on the oil rig and a helicopter is no exception. People need to physically be on the helideck to safely land the helicopter and under certain circumstances this can be very dangerous. Being hit by the rotor blade will cut your head off. The helicopter also needs to refuel before leaving causing spill hazards and the possibility for fires should things go wrong

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Working on the deck there are a lot of tools and loose objects that all needs to be secured for a safe working environment. Falling objects and things that seemingly just come flying to due wind, waves and weather are all constant threats to getting through the shift alive. 

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Linda - Cash Office

Linda - Cash Office | OHS Quest 2 & 3 | Scoop.it

Linda works at the cash office in Dreamworld and is responsible for collecting money throughout the park and balancing the books.

Cath Myrtvedt's insight:

This is Linda, she works in the cash office at Dreamworld. Even though she works at a theme park she doesn’t actually do much work in the park itself.

 

Most of Linda’s time is spent in the cash office, counting money and making floats, going through EFTPOS receipts and issuing refunds. To do her job successfully she has to lift heavy bags of coins and make up change to the different departments and outlets inside the park.

 

Every Tuesday and Saturday she has to empty the lockers and carry a heavy bag of coins back to the office, and on a rotating roster she walks all over the park to fill up the ATMs. Whenever she goes inside the park to collect or deliver money she is accompanied by a security guard, but she has to carry the money herself.

 

As a woman with failing health she thinks it is unreasonable to carry these heavy bags around the rather large park and she has instigated a change in policy so the staff no longer has to lift excessive weight during work hours. Thanks to Linda's efforts and ongoing contact with HR new policies will soon be in place so that staff will not have to lift anything over a set weight limit in order to complete their work.

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Martine - Day Care Worker

Martine - Day Care Worker | OHS Quest 2 & 3 | Scoop.it

Martine works at a day care centre caring for children aged from 2 to 3 years old and faces daily obstacles that can cause harm to the children she is responsible for.

Cath Myrtvedt's insight:

This is my sister, Martine. She works at a day care centre with children aged 2-3 years old, and faces daily obstacles in providing a safe environment for the kids. The room Martine is in is on the first floor, so every day the children needs to get to their room by using the stairs or by using an elevator. The elevator does not always work and when it does the door can easily catch little fingers.

 

The front door to the room Martine works in is made of metal, and it is very heavy. It can be hard to open, and hard to keep open, making a finger jam an imminent threat. Playing inside offers a myriad of dangers, like beads and sequins that can be swallowed and obstruct airways, cords from blinds that may not be securely fastened away from the children’s reach and dishwashing liquid that can be accessed if the kitchen door is not properly secured.

 

Outside play has rocks and sand that can be consumed, swings that can be fallen off and climbing frames that can be a significant fall for small children, as well as seeds and plant materials that can cause reactions if eaten. Monthly excursions outside the day care centre involves walking along trafficked roads when going to places like the museum. Dams and creeks throughout the city is also a hazard should anyone fall in, especially during winter when the children will be wearing a lot of clothes making them very heavy, very quickly.

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