OHS in Mining
43 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Mark Brodie
Scoop.it!

Quest 3 Fatigue Management

Quest 3 Fatigue Management | OHS in Mining | Scoop.it

http://www.safeworkaustralia.gov.au/sites/SWA/about/Publications/Documents/826/Fatigue-Management-A-Workers-Guide.pdf

Mark Brodie's insight:

Fatigue is classed as physical and mental state of exhaustion which can affect a persons ability to perform safe and affective work. Due to the long hours that opal miners are putting in to get results and the pressures to find opal to keep the operation financial enough to keep open, fatigue is a common issue they contend with. This link shows the symptoms and signs of fatigue, the risk it adds to the work environment and ways of monitoring and dealing with it when it does become a risk.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mark Brodie
Scoop.it!

Quest 3 Industrial Ergonomics

Ergonomics is the process of designing work areas to be user friendly by using tools and equipment to reduce strain and/or repetitive motions and teaching ...
Mark Brodie's insight:

The confined spaces and tools used in the mining for opals have a high risk of causing repetitive strain or MSD (muscular skeletal disorder) injury from awkward and static postures and repetitive work procedures.. This video gives an insight to the symptoms, risks and preventative measures that can be introduced to the work method used by James and his work mates. Even though this video says its not for training purposes it explain in basic terms the importance  of considering ergonomics in risk assessments and different ways to control and reduce the hazards that could cause injury.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mark Brodie
Scoop.it!

QUEST 3 Workaholic Health Risks

Are you a workaholic? That double shift could be putting your health at risk. »»» Subscribe to The National to watch more videos here: ...
Mark Brodie's insight:

 With the financial pressures of opal miners to find colour (opal) they often work long hours hoping to find gems just to keep financial enough to keep them in operation. Because of the hit and miss work environment miners can do a lot of digging before they actually find  colour of any value.  Because of this pressure they tend to over work themselves cutting meals and sleep which inevitably will affect their physical health as well as their mental health by raising  stress levels which could lead to anxiety or depression as discussed in this Workaholic Health Risk video..

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mark Brodie
Scoop.it!

QUEST 2 SURFING

QUEST 2 SURFING | OHS in Mining | Scoop.it
Mark Brodie's insight:

This is my brother on a recent trip we did to Indo. The ohs problems you would have with this sport could be exposure to the elements (sun and cold), dangers of interaction with marine life (sharks, stingers etc.) impact injuries from surfboards or shallow reefs, rips, tides and danger of drowning. PPE that is used are wetsuits for the elements, sun screen, leg ropes (so they don't loose their board) and floatation devices when in larger surf. It is usually good practice to sit and study the surf break for a while before you go out so you can determine the best way out, any rips that are there and the character of the waves such as the frequency of the sets and the size and distance between them. Its also a good idea to not surf alone in case you run into difficulties.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mark Brodie
Scoop.it!

QUEST 2 TRAFFIC CONTROL

QUEST 2 TRAFFIC CONTROL | OHS in Mining | Scoop.it
Mark Brodie's insight:

This is a traffic controller (Dave) that was working on one of the job sites I was on recently. All traffic controllers while actively working on roadways have many risks they have to take into account. Traffic and the reliability of the drivers of vehicles to be aware of the environment they are entering (restricted speed work area) is a high risk for these workers where the chance of major injury or death by being struck by a vehicle is a constant possibility. Other risks are heat sickness and fatigue as they are in an open environment constantly a can do shifts for up to 12 hours standing in the one place for up to 4 hours at a time. The PPE is designed to make them stand out from a distance with high vision clothes, broad brim hats for sun protection and correct signage leading up to them should make traffic aware of there presence. People think this is a easy job but to stay switched on to the surroundings of the job can be mentally draining which can dull the reaction time of the worker when the risk of an incident  arises.    

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mark Brodie from Mining Industry and OHS
Scoop.it!

NSW Mining OHS: What does health & safety mean to me? - YouTube

There's nothing more important to come out of a mine than our miners. That's why health and safety is the top priority in NSW Mining, which has a world class...

Via Jayde Dwight, Lyle Dighton
Mark Brodie's insight:

Videos such as this contain a relevant viewpoint, as the people featured are workers in the mining industry and have knowledge on the operative processes involved in achieving effective health and safety prevention.

more...
Jayde Dwight's curator insight, March 3, 2014 10:28 PM

Excellent short video that shows REAL mining workers and their perspective on why health and safety is important to them. 

Lyle Dighton's curator insight, March 14, 2014 8:30 AM

Videos such as this contain a relevant viewpoint, as the people featured are workers in the mining industry and have knowledge on the operative processes involved in achieving effective health and safety prevention.

Rescooped by Mark Brodie from occupational health and safety
Scoop.it!

Courageous Safety Leadership - YouTube

Courageous Safety Leadership is a philosophy that challenges existing values, beliefs and attitudes towards safety. It outlines the changes required to attai...

Via Dr Kirstin Ferguson, Mark Brodie
Mark Brodie's insight:

This article shows how necessary a strong safety leadership is when introducing policies into a work place. The person responsible for the introduction and monitoring of safety procedures should have a strong belief and positive attitude towards the safety methods used and be proactive with the workers to get the result the procedures where introduced for.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mark Brodie
Scoop.it!

Your air freshener could be harming your health

Your air freshener could be harming your health | OHS in Mining | Scoop.it
With scores of air fresheners out there, you can have the messiest room in your home smelling like a tropical fruit stand or a misty rainforest. But all those seemingly pleasant scents may be bad for your health.
Mark Brodie's insight:

I have always wondered how bad the chemicals in these products would be for your health considering they are fairly common. Everywhere you go there are air fresheners being used in a spray form from public toilets to private dwellings. I have never trusted any kind of chemical when it comes to absorption into the human body.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mark Brodie from occupational health and safety
Scoop.it!

HEAT STRESS SAFETY IN THE WORK PLACE: | Live Psychic Readings

‘Heat stress’ means, the stress produced due to too much of exposure to heat. It happens to workers who work in heavy sunlight for a long time without even given a break. When our body is exposed to excessive heat for long hours like this, it may result in dehydration, heat stroke and even lead u... http://infiniteadvice.com/2015/05/03/heat-stress-safety-in-the-work-place/
Mark Brodie's insight:

Having recently worked in Darwin I found this to be the silent hazard. Not everyone feels the affect of heat on the body until it starts shutting down and if you don't realise the signs of heat stress it can easily advance into something a lot more serious very quickly. I think its a personal responsibility to monitor this hazard because only the person affected can know what's happening to their body and take steps to counter it.

more...
Mark Brodie's curator insight, July 25, 2015 11:46 AM

Having recently worked in Darwin I found this to be the silent hazard

Rescooped by Mark Brodie from Electrical Safety
Scoop.it!

Quest 3 Electrical safety

Quest 3 Electrical safety | OHS in Mining | Scoop.it
Electricity can kill or severely injure people and cause damage to property.

Via jcelectricsb
Mark Brodie's insight:

There are a lot of needs for electrical equipment in the running of  small mining operations from lighting of the work area to power tools that are used in the extraction and processing of the opal bearing dirt. Electrical safety is a big issue on the mine sites where opals are found where the lack of any regulatory monitoring leaves the safety of this up to the individuals working the claim. This link would give James some good insight on ways to make the work place safer when it comes to the hazards and risks involved with handling electrical equipment and the power used to run it. The article also has links to other relevant sites on electrical safety and is very informative on the safe use and maintenance of electrical powered equipment. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mark Brodie
Scoop.it!

QUEST 3 OPAL MINERS GUIDE

QUEST 3 OPAL MINERS GUIDE | OHS in Mining | Scoop.it
Mark Brodie's insight:

;

http://www.maqohsc.sa.gov.au/_upload_docs/20090216064054.OpalMining.pdf

Most opal miners, like my friend James, are self employed and lack the corporate support that often makes occupational health and safety a reality. This link shows a guide developed by the Mining and Quarrying Occupational Health and Safety Committee (MAQOHSC). It contains 110 pages of relevant information on safety in the process of opal mining from ground clearance to refurbishment as well as the importance for compliance to the relevant standards and Acts.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mark Brodie
Scoop.it!

QUEST 2 ROOFING

QUEST 2 ROOFING | OHS in Mining | Scoop.it
Mark Brodie's insight:

This is Graham and Mick fixing my neighbours roof after cyclone Marcia. Ohs issues they contend with are working at heights, slips trips and falls, exposure to the elements, muscle strains from awkward body positioning, cuts and abrasions from sharp edges and glare from reflected light. The way they control these hazards are a safety harness or edge protection to protect from falling, sun screen a hat and water to protect from the affects of the sun, sunglasses to protect from glare, gloves to protect from sharp edges, rubber soled shoes for grip to lessen the chance of slipping and a tool belt to leave hands free while walking on the roof as well as allowing three point contact while ascending and descending a ladder to and from the roof. Training on correct posture under certain conditions would help protect them from repetitive muscle strain and knee pads  would help protect from tissue bruising while kneeling on a hard surface.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mark Brodie
Scoop.it!

QUEST 2 SCAFFOLDING AT HEIGHTS

QUEST 2 SCAFFOLDING AT HEIGHTS | OHS in Mining | Scoop.it
Mark Brodie's insight:

This is a picture of a Rick a friend of mine who has been scaffolding for 15 years. OHS issues he would have would be keeping three point contact while ascending as well descending  the risks of slips, trips or falls which could cause serious injury or even death depending on the height they are working at. Falling objects are also a risk that they face. The protection they have in place is safety harness with fall restrictors as well as hard hats for falling objects and utility belt for tools which leaves their hands free while ascending or descending the scaffold without their harness attached.. All scaffolders should be trained and ticketed before they are allowed to scale and work on any scaffold. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mark Brodie
Scoop.it!

QUEST 2 OPAL MINING AT LIGHTNING RIDGE

QUEST 2 OPAL MINING AT LIGHTNING RIDGE | OHS in Mining | Scoop.it
Mark Brodie's insight:

This is a mate of mine James who is mining for opal at Lightning Ridge. The hazards associated with this job are noise from equipment, falling objects, dehydration, muscle strain due to the ergonomic design of equipment and possible eye damage from shards of rock.These hazards can be lessened with PPE and proper technique. I have been informed cave ins are very rare due to the rock seam they follow giving the roof support.All the plant that is used for this type of mining is operated with relevant competencies where required and depending on the safety culture of the miners and the presence of safety procedures that they have implemented are usually run to an acceptable standard, but like most professions you do get exceptions. The most common injury in this job I am told is muscle strain from the ergonomic design of the equipment and its long term use in confined spaces. 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mark Brodie from Mining Industry and OHS
Scoop.it!

Too many are dying in mining accidents - Northern Star

Too many are dying in mining accidents - Northern Star | OHS in Mining | Scoop.it
Too many are dying in mining accidents
Northern Star
TOO MANY mine workers are being killed on Australian operations and too many of those are contractors.

Via Nicholas Rowland, Lyle Dighton
Mark Brodie's insight:

An insufficient knowledge of OHS practices and standards is why the mining industry is claiming the mentioned fatalities. Ongoing safety awareness training and education should be made more available for mining personnel to utilise. Another method of preventing deaths could also involve safety professionals working with personnel more often than against them (working together to achieve effective safety outcomes).

more...
Glen Evans's curator insight, March 11, 2014 1:20 PM

This article shows that contractors especially smaller companies with less experience in the development and implementation in their own safety procedures are a big factor when it comes to deaths on mine sites. The human factor must always play a part and education in regard to safety especially with big industry, with large unforgiving equipment at work, is one of the most important tools given to workers.  

Lyle Dighton's curator insight, March 14, 2014 8:35 AM

An insufficient knowledge of OHS practices and standards is why the mining industry is claiming the mentioned fatalities. Ongoing safety awareness training and education should be made more available for mining personnel to utilise. Another method of preventing deaths could also involve safety professionals working with personnel more often than against them (working together to achieve effective safety outcomes).

lee matthews's curator insight, March 15, 2017 4:56 AM
In the future I would love to work on a mine site, and yes as the article states "they are dangerous". However with proper training and education around procedures and equipment this can be drastically minimised. But..... what if this was not the case due to need or indeed duty of care. This article particularly touches base with me as I have been in the civil industry for some time and seen what poorly arranged and ill equipped contracts and  labour hire can do. Traditionally you would start with a company and be taught from the ground up. You would care for your employees and take them from job to job where applicable. This meant that you knew their skill levels, what they were capable of and also most importantly their level of training as it was done "in house". I personally believe this created "all round" workers with solid foundations of knowledge. It also gave the worker a sense of security and longer term purpose, to which the worker would return in loyalty and knowledge obtained over time of employment.
With the introduction of labour hire and contractors into a highly competitive and often profitable environment this changed, I believe for the worst. Jobs once again became about profit and as a result machine maintenance, employee education, job stability and pay rates diminished while keeping the mirage that production and profits were all on track. Yet workplace accidents rose? So who is to blame? Surely not the principle contractor who head hunted the cheapest contract... what about the embattled contractor who didn't read the fine lines in his contract and is battling to meet deadline, find operators and stay afloat? Should jobs then be won from a safety stand point? Would that not promote companies to cover up incidents in order to win contracts?  I might not know the answer to these question but ,I sure know who ends up suffering until we get it right. Me and you the humble worker who just wants food on the table and to see their family EVERY night.
Scooped by Mark Brodie
Scoop.it!

The everlasting story of Chinese industrial accidents | The World of ...

The everlasting story of Chinese industrial accidents | The World of ... | OHS in Mining | Scoop.it
The Kunshan factory blast is only the last in line of a long series of casualties and loose worker safety policy.
Mark Brodie's insight:

This article shows that a countries economic and production superiority can not justify the lack of safety policies that are introduced into its work environment. China is probably one of the largest exporters of produced goods in the world but still lacks in the safety of its production processes and shows how little they value the life and rights of their work force.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mark Brodie
Scoop.it!

FORGET HEALTH AND SAFETY!!!

What a scaffolding is really meant for!
Mark Brodie's insight:

This just shows that not everybody considers their actions reckless. This guy is probably not considering the risk in his actions here even though probably very slight  but there is still a risk of an incident occurring.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mark Brodie from Business change
Scoop.it!

7 Things Leaders Do to Help People Change

7 Things Leaders Do to Help People Change | OHS in Mining | Scoop.it
Ever tried to change anyone’s behavior at work? It can be extremely frustrating. So often the effort produces an opposite result: rupturing the relationship, diminishing job performance, or causing the person to dig in their heels. Still, some approaches clearly work better than others.

We reviewed a dataset of 2,852 direct reports of 559 leaders. The direct reports rated their managers on 49 behaviors and also assessed the leaders on their effectiveness at leading change – specifically, the managers’ ability to influence others to move in the direction the organization wanted to go. We then analyzed those who had the highest and lowest ratings on their ability to lead change, and compared that with the other behaviors we’d measured.

We found that some behaviors were less helpful in changing others. We found two that had little to no impact, thereby providing useful guidance on what not to do:

Via David Hain
Mark Brodie's insight:

The hardest thing in influencing people on the importance of safety is trying to change a long standing safety culture

more...
David Hain's curator insight, July 25, 2015 3:35 AM

One of Newton’s Laws of Thermodynamics was that a body at rest tends to stay at rest. Change needs constant invigoration! ~ Zenger & Folkman