OHS in Every Environment: OHS Quest 2
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Workplace Hazards in the Hospitality Industry

Breeanne Watson's insight:

This fact sheet provides information about hazards found in the hospitality industry, as well as possible harmful effects and prevention actions. While the document has been created for students undertaking workplace training programs, it provides quick and basic information about hazards that may be encountered in the hospitality setting.

 

The document is easy to follow and clearly identifies possible hazards, including: equipment; sharps; hot oil/grease; slippery floors; cleaning products; contact with the public; manual handling; exposure to blood/body fluids; and, bullying. Along with the possible hazards identified, the document clearly outlines possible action to prevent injury/illness for every hazard recognized.

 

This fact sheet would provide a basic starting point when considering OHS in the hospitality industry. While it does not go into depth with hazards or management systems, Shannon could use this information as a base to build upon when considering OHS issues and management systems.

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Managing Occupational Health and Safety in the Hospitality Industry for Small Business

Breeanne Watson's insight:

This document proves an excellent resource for anyone in the hospitality industry, providing information about setting up and running a safety management system. The information in this manual provides a simple step by step guide to creating a system that will not only satisfy legal requirements, but may also improve the efficiency of staff in relation to OHS procedures,

 

This manual will assist Shannon in managing and preventing OHS issues in the hospitality field in a number of different ways. The guide provides information on the costs of having adequate an OHS system, including insured and uninsured costs. The manual also provides a guide to setting up a safety management system, including the duties to be aware of and how to write OHS policies. In addition, the document provides clear information on the management of hazards, suggesting managing hazards the SAFE way; see it, assess it, fix it, evaluate it. This is invaluable information to anyone in the hospitality field who is unsure of how to address the issue of hazard management. Furthermore, the manual provides information on keeping records of incidents, and what to do if someone is injured. Finally, the document provides a number of example forms that would aid Shannon in maintaining the right paperwork, and a number of information sheets about how to manage more common hazards that would be found in the hospitality industry.

 

This document would be an instrumental resource to provide a basic understanding of everything required when considering OHS in the hospitality industry.

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In the kitchen - Workplace Health and Safety Queensland#.U2LjJ0l-_IX

Cafe Online is an Workplace Health and Safety educational tool for the hospitality industry.
Breeanne Watson's insight:

This is an interactive resource provided by the Queensland Government Department of Justice and Attorney-General – Workplace Health and Safety Queensland. The site provides an online and interactive café, and provides safety information relevant to all facets of a café, including the restaurant, deliveries, the manager’s office, kitchen, rubbish and drive thru.

 

In the restaurant alone, the resource provides tips to limit the risk of injury from hazards such as manual handling, noise, environmental hazards (slips, falls), heat, and, personal security. In the kitchen, it provides information again about the environmental hazards, manual handing and heat, but also provides information about working with gas, electricity, machinery and tools, and the possibility of fire.

 

This resource provides a fun and interactive way of delivering vital information about all aspects of OHS in the hospitality environment. It would not only be an excellent resource for Shannon to use when addressing OHS hazard management, but may also be used as a training tool for staff.

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Jeff, 51, Office Manager

Jeff, 51, Office Manager | OHS in Every Environment: OHS Quest 2 | Scoop.it
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“What is OHS?”

 

Jeff says: “All workers, regardless of their occupation or how they are engaged, have the right to a healthy and safe working environment. Well designed, healthy and safe work practices will allow workers to have more productive working lives.”

 

Jeff works as a Manager in an office, with a large number of staff working beneath him. Every day, they work to support members of the public, with their clientele being mostly walk-in and over-the-phone, seeking assistance.

 

As would be similar in any office environment, the main two OHS issues identified were that of:

Slips, trips and falls; andFire

 

Furthermore to these, OHS issues identified that could be either general office issues or more specific to Jeff’s workplace include:

Repetitive Strain Injury (RSI)Eye Fatigue; andCustomer Aggression

 

These hazards are addressed regularly to maintain a system to minimise the risks. The office is designed to have walkways clear of obstacles, which assists both to avoid slips, trips and falls, and to provide a safe egress method in case of a fire. Employee’s practice safe methods, including regular breaks and moving about, to reduce the possibility of RSI and eye fatigue from looking at a computer monitor all day.  

 

Customer Aggression is an identified hazard that can affect both the health and safety of all employees. Clients will occasionally become violent and physically assault staff; which can have obvious physical but also emotional effects on the staff member. The company employs procedures to minimise the possibility of physical attacks against staff, and also offers services to the assist staff suffering either physically or emotionally as the result of an aggressive customer.

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Georgia, 23, Supermarket Checkout Operator

Georgia, 23, Supermarket Checkout Operator | OHS in Every Environment: OHS Quest 2 | Scoop.it
Breeanne Watson's insight:

“What is OHS?”

 

Georgia says: “Occupational Health and Safety is a collection of regulations, procedures and protocols, embedded and enforced within a workplace to ensure employees are provided with a safe working environment.”

 

Georgia works as a register operator for a supermarket. Duties include customer relations, sale of stock and collection of trolleys. OHS is considered before every shift, and while performing common tasks throughout a shift. Hazards that may be encountered have been identified as:

Slips, trips and fallsSprains and strainsRepetitive Strain Injury (RSI)Manual handling; andTraffic (Trolley Collection)

 

In order to minimise the risk of these hazards causing illness or injury, the company has extensive OHS Management Systems in place. Staff are required to participate in OHS training prior to commencing their employment. This training includes:

Identifying and rectifying potential hazards (E.g. procedures for managing a spill)Safe lift techniques; andTrolley collection protocols (including; the use of PPE (high visibility vest) and limiting the number of trolleys collected at one time)

 

In addition to these procedures; the employer practices methods to limit and avoid the effects of RSI. Staff are required to alternate the direction of work on every shift, as well as practice hand and wrist exercises throughout every shift.

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Occupational Health and Safety in Hospitality

Breeanne Watson's insight:

This document, produced by Work Cover New South Wales, is a comprehensive overview of everything one must consider in regards to OHS in the hospitality industry. The document is produced as a Supervisors Training Manual, and thus provides in depth information.

 

The manual begins by providing information on the Legislative Framework relevant to hospitality, discussing the relevant Act and Regulations, and also standards and guidance notes. The document then provides information on OHS risk management systems, specific hazard management information, and OHS issues for specific service areas. It then provides information on documentation and the record keeping process. The manual then discusses workplace injury management and workers compensation, including rights and responsibilities of both the employer and the employee. The document also includes relevant associated legislation and regulations.

 

This document would provide Shannon with a comprehensive knowledge of all things OHS in the hospitality field. As a Supervisors Training Manual, the document goes into great detail about identifying OHS hazards and hospitality-specific hazard management systems.

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Health and Safety information - Workplace Health and Safety Queensland#.U2Lmv0l-_IV

Breeanne Watson's insight:

This article provides health and safety tips and general information on ways to management the most common hazards and risks in the hospitality industry. The information provides guidance to effectively manage health and safety, and tips to help eliminate common hazards.

 

The document first provides general information about identifying unsafe and/or unhealthy issues within the environment, and how to rectify said issues. It also provides information about ensuring the problem is rectified and will no longer be a hazard. The document then provides more specific information about OHS hazards in the hospitality industry, including: electricity; hazardous substances/chemicals; heat stress; machinery and equipment; manual tasks; personal security; sharps and biological hazards; and, slips, trips and falls. Under each item listed, the document provides information on managing the hazards and tips for limiting the risk. In addition to the information provided in the document, the document lists internet sites and documents that provide further information about each risk.

 

This document would provide Shannon with a basic understanding of OHS risks and hazards in the hospitality industry, and how to effectively manage and rectify these hazards. It also provides a route of where to go to find further information on any given hazard identified.

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Shannon, 27, Chef

Shannon, 27, Chef | OHS in Every Environment: OHS Quest 2 | Scoop.it
Breeanne Watson's insight:

“What is OHS?”

 

Shannon says: “OHS is a duty of care that everyone in the workplace is responsible for.”

 

As a Chef, Shannon works in a commercial kitchen, and must consider OHS on a regular basis. With the environment itself a potential hazard, safety is of the upmost importance. The hazards involved in working in a commercial kitchen include:

Slips, trips and fallsHeat stressBurns and scaldsKnives and bladesHazardous chemicalsCuts and punctures; andRepetitive Strain Injury (RSI)

 

With an abundance of hazards to consider on a daily basis, OHS management is critical. Methods used to minimise the risk in this environment include:

Regular breaksPersonal Protective Equipment (PPE); andThe ‘Behind’ method

 

Given the extreme temperatures experienced when working in a commercial kitchen, heat stress is a serious safety issue. A chef will endeavour to leave the kitchen to a cooler environment whenever possible, while also ensuring good ventilation and airflow where possible in the kitchen. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) is mandatory before entering the kitchen. PPE includes: chef jacket, chef pants, apron, neckerchief, closed-in leather shoes, hat, gloves, and eye and face protection where necessary (E.g. googles when using chemicals). The ‘Behind’ method is employed in Shannon’s and many other’s kitchen, when space is limited and there are a number of people in the kitchen. The ‘Behind’ method is simply a way of reducing injury by making someone’s presence known when they are moving behind others with hot items. Kitchens must identify the risks of all chemicals on site and manage them in relation to storage, use and disposal.

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Helen, 37, Paramedic

Helen, 37, Paramedic | OHS in Every Environment: OHS Quest 2 | Scoop.it
Breeanne Watson's insight:

“What is OHS?”

 

Helen says: “OHS is there to protect you, your patient and bystanders from injury. It’s about treating every situation with care and attention to safety so that everyone can go home at the end of their shift.”

 

As a paramedic, Helen cannot afford to ignore OHS. As she states when asked about OHS, “everyone wants to go home at the end of their shift”. Managing OHS hazards correctly is paramount to ensuring everyone finishes their shift well.

There is an abundance of Health and Safety issues that are part of the everyday job of being a paramedic. The health risks of being a paramedic can be identified as:

ContaminationExposure to contagious and/or infectious diseaseExposure to chemicalsHealth implications of shirt work; andPhysiological stress

 

Most of these risks can be reduced with the implementation of safe work practices. Ensuring the correct handling of chemicals and the use of the correct Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) can reduce the risk of illness or injury as a result of the chemicals used on a shift. Further to these physical hazards, the emotional stressors of the job, and the implications of shift work can negatively affect a person’s health. Regulations are put in place to ensure paramedics get sufficient breaks between shifts and sufficient rest periods before a run on-road. Services are available to paramedics to aid them in coping with the physiological stress of such a confronting job. These services are available confidentially and free of charge to support the emotionally wellbeing of staff.

 

In addition to the health hazards, paramedics are faced with several safety hazards as well. These can include:

Exposure to extreme environments and temperaturesDriving at high speeds in unfavourable conditionsLifting; andDangers of walking into an uncontrolled scene

 

Paramedics work in an ever-changing field. There is no way of controlling the extreme weather conditions and temperatures in which they work; however they can implement methods to reduce the effect this has on the paramedic. Paramedics are trained to drive at excessive speeds in dangerous environments. They must participate in this training and are experienced in driving in such conditions to reduce the risk that this could cause injury to themselves or anyone else. Paramedics are also trained in safe lift methods to reduce the risk of physical injury from lifting patients and heavy equipment.

The danger of walking into an uncontrolled scene is a common safety hazard for paramedics. Paramedics are trained to defend themselves when they are in danger, but they are also trained to recognise dangers situations in order to avoid placing themselves in such a situation at all. This is a primary method of safety management for paramedics everywhere.

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Aiden, 25, Butcher

Aiden, 25, Butcher | OHS in Every Environment: OHS Quest 2 | Scoop.it
Breeanne Watson's insight:

“What is OHS?”

 

Aiden says: “OHS is rules and regulations put in place to protect staff members from injury whilst at work.”

 

As a butcher, Aiden must consider OHS on a daily basis. Working with food, and with sharps, requires attention to healthy and safe practices.

 

The health of staff in this environment can be affected by a number of factors, and it is this reason that leads to the implementation of methods to reduce the risk to staff. Health hazards identified for anyone working in butcher shop include:

Exposure to chemicals; andExposure to varying temperatures

 

Chemicals are required to ensure the cleanliness of equipment to avoid food contamination. However, this can also pose a health risk to staff. Staff are expected to follow manufacturer’s instructions when using all chemicals; including storing, using, and the PPE required when using. Given the importance of avoiding contamination, stock must be stored at a specific temperature below 3ºC. This means that employees in a butcher shop must work in conditions of this temperature to ensure meat is not contaminated during preparation. Staff are exposed to the health risks of working in low temperatures, and going between these low temperatures and general room temperature when moving stock for display purposed.

 

Safety is of paramount importance when working in a butcher shop. Hazards that may be encountered by a butcher on a daily basis include:

Sharp bladesBurnsElectrical hazardsSlippery floor surfacesHeavy items; andExposure to chemicals

 

With most of these identified as unavoidable hazards, procedures are put in place to minimise the risk of these hazards resulting in injury. All staff are required to use Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) including enclosed and solid shoes, steel gloves when slicing, and aprons. In addition, staff must have had the correct training before being permitted to operate equipment (for example; the bandsaw can only be used by persons who have completed official training). The shop itself is designed to minimise the possibility of water coming into contact with electrical outlets, and is fitted with non-slip flooring. Staff are also required to practice assisted lift procedures when moving heavy items. As a before-mentioned health risk, as well as a safety hazard, methods are put in place to minimise the risk of chemical exposure to staff.

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