OHS, friends and relatives
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8hrtraining.ppt

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This powerpoint shows all the dangers posed by foods all over the world and how to avoid them, this is a major OHS issue experienced by military personnel. Ron would receive briefs about food safety in all countries he would visit, especially third-world countries, such as India and Thailand... 

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Armed Defense Training Association (ADTA) - Four Basic Rules of Gun Safety

Armed Defense Training Association (ADTA) - Four Basic Rules of Gun Safety | OHS, friends and relatives | Scoop.it
Ben Bishop's insight:

Firearm safety was one of the most important OHS problems in the military and training had to be completed prior to being sent into active service. This show's how Ron would have handled a firearm if he was given one for use in combat protection and working around them!

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summer01.pdf

Ben Bishop's insight:

This article shows how military personnel are taught to risk management and shows how it can affect Ron's career. This document can further show how he has been brought aware of these dangers at work and in life.

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Aedan - Volunteer Fire Fighter reservist

Aedan - Volunteer Fire Fighter reservist | OHS, friends and relatives | Scoop.it

Aedan is a fire volunteer for the local fire brigades. While work he has to deal with OHS everyday through the many dangers of fighting fires and public relations. To keep OHS awareness within a fire brigade, special training, like that of the military are supplied to prepare all fire fighters are prepared for the dangerous tasks at hand. Safety equipment such as fire proofed clothing and respirators are used to keep personnel safe from dangerous situations within, for example a house fire. This in a way is very similar to that of the military and their issues of equipment and gear to suit each task at hand.

 

Aedan’s comment:

“For every task we get, fire protection is issued to each person, a respirator, fire proof suit. This is the most basic OHS procedure we are taught as volunteers.”

Ben Bishop's insight:

It is without doubt, Fire fighting is one of the most dangerous tasks for people to do as a job (or as a volunteer). As I can imagine (and from what I have learnt) OHS is utilized in every aspect within this work space, making sure that all personnel are ready to take on any task at hand!

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Ron - USAF Special Operations

Ron - USAF Special Operations | OHS, friends and relatives | Scoop.it

Ron joined the American Air Force (USAF) in 1981 and was transferred into special operations not too long after he completed his training. Through his years of service, he had been sent to countless  countries, from the deserts of Afghanistan to the jungles of Thailand. In every country all personnel sent there would be given OHS briefs about the surrounding area and dangerous animals in the environment, this was an OHS procedure to keep troops and military personnel safe. The Air Forces of the United States had installed these procedures by allowing advisors to check the local environment to keep personnel safe from the elements of the particular foreign country. Ron mentioned that also when his unit was transferred to Alaska, the airmen had to change their equipment, to better suit the area. This equipment included heavy winter coats, thermal undergarments and other changes to weaponry. This included changing their sidearm from the “M9 Berretta” to the “M1911 Colt” to ward off angry animals in the area.

 

 

OHS dangers in this context include:

 

Heavy Loading

 

Dangerous machinery (aircraft, ground vehicles, ships/boats and explosives)

 

Firearms

 

Dangerous chemicals (SARIN, toxic gases such as monoxide, radioactive waste, etc)

 

Wild Animals

 

Mental overloading

 

Ron’s comment:

“My area as a Special Operator, was a very dangerous place, where there is no room for mistakes. OHS is very important here to keep all personnel within a certain area of operation out of trouble.”

Ben Bishop's insight:

It is interesting to find that not only our defense force uses OHS in their procedures, but that all other countries have specific needs of this safety lookout to keep people from getting hurt!

 

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VG%2011%20Safety%20Brief%20.pptx

Ben Bishop's insight:

This particular safety brief outlines all dangers and issues that could be found while in a foreign country or during regular military procedures. Ron would be given a brief such as this in every country or location of operation he would arrive at, to keep him safe from dangers posed by these actions with military units.

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Trauma Risk Management (TRiM) - British Army Website

Post traumatic stress disorder information and trauma risk management (TRiM)
Ben Bishop's insight:

This internet source further states how Ron would overcome trauma inducing activities with the military, such as in accidents and stressful events. It states in this source that certain steps are taken to avoid psychological  and mental damage. One such example includes a briefing and debriefing before and after operations and missions to make sure that personnel are still capable of service.

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Courtney - Aviation Student and Tae Kwon Do champion

Courtney - Aviation Student and Tae Kwon Do champion | OHS, friends and relatives | Scoop.it

Courtney, a local Tae Kwon Do champion and a partaker in the Bachelor of Aviation technology degree at CQU has seen the benefits of having OHS in both in flying and in Martial Arts of all sorts. While flying Courtney is aware that if anything goes wrong off of the ground after takeoff, could lead to severe injury or death, the best possible way is to do safety checks before taking off. This is a perfect example of OHS being used within the Civil aviation industry. In martial arts of any sort, OHS is needed due to the fact that there is a high possibility of injury due to physical contact with others, therefore training to avoid injury is in place and certain parameters on the arts are placed to also avoid this.

 

 

Courtney’s thoughts:

“OHS is good because keeps u aware of dangers involved in your surroundings, and is very useful in the light of flying and martial arts, as both can be very dangerous if not taken seriously.”

Ben Bishop's insight:

Seriousness and common sense are probably some of the most important aspects of OHS, its the basis of it, that knowing that what your doing is dangerous and must be done in a manner that will hinder that risk to the smallest possibility. Also it is good to see that OHS is a big part of the civil air industry, I could not imagine it without safety procedures.  

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Tim - Australian Army Reservist

Tim - Australian Army Reservist | OHS, friends and relatives | Scoop.it

In the army Tim was assigned to the Engineers, where their job was to create structures such as bridges, makeshift buildings and to create anti-tank and anti-personnel traps. During his service he was stationed in the Middle East for support missions alongside the Australian military forces. When stationed in the Middle East, specialised equipment was issued to them to keep infantry safe during military exercises and help them to complete a mission without minimal casualties. For example most infantry were issued an assault rifle to suppress any opposition within an area, but at times other weapons, such as shotguns, grenade launchers and anti-tank weaponry was issued as well, depending on what enemy forces were detected in the area of operation. This was to allow for protection of soldiers going into battle

 

Tim’s comments:

“During most of our basic training… this was where most of the dangers where, as there was more unexperienced people using dangerous equipment, this is where OHS is its most important. It’s designed to keep us all safe, and therefore, we follow through with all the safety procedures we can!”

Ben Bishop's insight:

It is good to know that our armed forces are implemented with OHS procedures that are installed to keep military personnel safe, but it is sad to know that it takes one person to ignore one safety rule and many people could be hurt, therefore it brings to light that every detail of safety is important, no matter the task!

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Leo - Retired Australian Army and Bus driver

Leo - Retired Australian Army and Bus driver | OHS, friends and relatives | Scoop.it

Leo was enlisted into the Australian army right before the Vietnam war and took position as a Royal Engineer, their job was to build/repair/destroy bridges, buildings and any other material important to the opposing army. Many hazardous situations had to be avoided and OHS training was still not as advanced as it was today. Experience from past experiences was the best safety for troops at this time. At the current time of date, Leo is now a bus driver for the Brisbane City Council and drives buses around the Brisbane George Street area. As a bus driver he has many things to worry about. These include; his location on the road, to know what mood another person was in and to watch for any dangers out on the road. Leo also stated off the side, that in some cases the military was almost like that of bus driving, as the public relations with differing people was still in effect, and making sure that where he drove (or built a military structure) was safe for everyone.  

 

Leo’s Comment:

“In the army at a young age, I had to worry about where to put down an army kitchen or a building and to make sure it was structurally sound, but as a Bus driver I had to worry more about where I was, rather than the structure, and also have to worry about others, so OHS is very important, as all fields of work require it...”

 

OHS dangers in this context include:

        Military (Army)

-          Heavy loadings

-          Explosive ordinance

-          Firearms

-          Dangerous chemicals

-          Fatigue

-          Occupational stress/violence/harassment

Bus Driver

-          Aggravated people (public relations)

-           Busy workplace (driving in big city)

-          Occupational stress/violence/harassment

-          Fatigue

-          Cleaning chemicals

Ben Bishop's insight:

From this I have learned that no matter where one goes, OHS is a very important procedure to keep in mind, it can be used everywhere, from the Army to life as a Civilian

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