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5 People Who Conquered The Long-Distance Job Search - #Hired

5 People Who Conquered The Long-Distance Job Search - #Hired | OHS | Scoop.it
While a cross-country (or globe) search can seem daunting, these five professionals prove that it’s definitely possible.

Via Cruise Line Class, Brett Smith
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Slips Trips and Falls - Preventing Falls Workplace Safety Training Video - WUMBUS OHS EHS DVD

http://www.wumbus.com/Slips-TripsFalls-Stranger-Than-Friction34.html Wumbus Corporation has the world's largest collection of online training courses and saf...
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Galveston Oil Spill Threatens Wildlife

Galveston Oil Spill Threatens Wildlife | OHS | Scoop.it
When oil spills occur, it is the wildlife and ocean life that suffer most. The latest spill in the Galveston Bay isn't any exception.

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Too many are dying in mining accidents - Northern Star

Too many are dying in mining accidents - Northern Star | OHS | Scoop.it
Too many are dying in mining accidents
Northern Star
TOO MANY mine workers are being killed on Australian operations and too many of those are contractors.

Via Nicholas Rowland
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Lyle Dighton's curator insight, March 14, 2014 8:35 AM

An insufficient knowledge of OHS practices and standards is why the mining industry is claiming the mentioned fatalities. Ongoing safety awareness training and education should be made more available for mining personnel to utilise. Another method of preventing deaths could also involve safety professionals working with personnel more often than against them (working together to achieve effective safety outcomes).

Mark Brodie's curator insight, August 3, 2015 9:17 PM

An insufficient knowledge of OHS practices and standards is why the mining industry is claiming the mentioned fatalities. Ongoing safety awareness training and education should be made more available for mining personnel to utilise. Another method of preventing deaths could also involve safety professionals working with personnel more often than against them (working together to achieve effective safety outcomes).

lee matthews's curator insight, March 15, 2017 4:56 AM
In the future I would love to work on a mine site, and yes as the article states "they are dangerous". However with proper training and education around procedures and equipment this can be drastically minimised. But..... what if this was not the case due to need or indeed duty of care. This article particularly touches base with me as I have been in the civil industry for some time and seen what poorly arranged and ill equipped contracts and  labour hire can do. Traditionally you would start with a company and be taught from the ground up. You would care for your employees and take them from job to job where applicable. This meant that you knew their skill levels, what they were capable of and also most importantly their level of training as it was done "in house". I personally believe this created "all round" workers with solid foundations of knowledge. It also gave the worker a sense of security and longer term purpose, to which the worker would return in loyalty and knowledge obtained over time of employment.
With the introduction of labour hire and contractors into a highly competitive and often profitable environment this changed, I believe for the worst. Jobs once again became about profit and as a result machine maintenance, employee education, job stability and pay rates diminished while keeping the mirage that production and profits were all on track. Yet workplace accidents rose? So who is to blame? Surely not the principle contractor who head hunted the cheapest contract... what about the embattled contractor who didn't read the fine lines in his contract and is battling to meet deadline, find operators and stay afloat? Should jobs then be won from a safety stand point? Would that not promote companies to cover up incidents in order to win contracts?  I might not know the answer to these question but ,I sure know who ends up suffering until we get it right. Me and you the humble worker who just wants food on the table and to see their family EVERY night.
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Workplace Info - HR and OHS roles should be integrated to build a safety culture

Workplace Info - HR and OHS roles should be integrated to build a safety culture | OHS | Scoop.it
HR is basically all about people. So is OHS. So, it logically follows that the HR function should be actively involved in promoting and maintaining OHS, which comes down to having a safety-oriented culture at the workplace.

Via Hailey Tarrant
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Hailey Tarrant's curator insight, July 13, 2014 6:51 PM

This article is focussed on organisational culture and the culture of safety which I have really understood whilst undertaking my degree. I have come to realise that culture is a focal part of all organisations and it is vital to have a well established positive culture. 

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General Duty of Care - WorkSafe

General Duty of Care - WorkSafe | OHS | Scoop.it

Via Skillmaker
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Skillmaker's curator insight, March 26, 2014 2:33 AM

For more Free online training see http://www.skillmaker.edu.au/

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Galveston Oil Spill Threatens Wildlife

Galveston Oil Spill Threatens Wildlife | OHS | Scoop.it
When oil spills occur, it is the wildlife and ocean life that suffer most. The latest spill in the Galveston Bay isn't any exception.

A …
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