Medic & OH&S on land and sea
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Rescooped by Glen Evans from A Tribute to Coal Miners
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Surge in coal industry accidents spurs online safety initiative | MINING.com

Surge in coal industry accidents spurs online safety initiative | MINING.com | Medic & OH&S on land and sea | Scoop.it
The Queensland coal sector saw a surge in mining-related accidents and injuries in 2012.

Via Junie Boudreau
Glen Evans's insight:

Education not only for the workers in the mining industry but also the industry itself is paramount in achieving a safer environment and by pooling information and initiatives such as in this article, can only improve safety practices across the mining communities. 

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Rachel Stronach's curator insight, March 1, 2014 3:01 AM

I am glad that the ACARP have finally realised the importance of communication.

Narelle McMahon's curator insight, March 10, 2014 7:22 AM

interesting read

Rescooped by Glen Evans from Young Makers
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Lifesaving Jacket for Miners Wins Intel's Top Innovation Prize

Lifesaving Jacket for Miners Wins Intel's Top Innovation Prize | Medic & OH&S on land and sea | Scoop.it
Inspired by the rescue of 33 miners trapped for 69 days, and Chile’s poor mining safety record, engineers have devised a potentially lifesaving high-tech jacket… (This Jacket Just Won Intel’s Top Prize for Innovation

Via Cammie Dunaway
Glen Evans's insight:

It is more often than not that innovation arises from tragedy or in this case an incident that trapped 33 miners.  The article explains how engineers have developed a new safety vest to be worn by underground miners, which is only an increase on the PPE and not better mining practices, but it is an innovation none the less.

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Cammie Dunaway's curator insight, November 19, 2013 6:10 PM

Inspirational story of wearable tech solving problems

Rescooped by Glen Evans from Big Data is a Big Deal!
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Big data project aims to stop mining accidents before they happen

Big data project aims to stop mining accidents before they happen | Medic & OH&S on land and sea | Scoop.it
Thanks to a project in Western Australia, big data might help reduce accidents on large mining and construction sites.

Via Steven Jackson, MBA
Glen Evans's insight:

With the advancement of technology it only makes sense to harness it, as to aid companies to prevent accidents in the Mining industry.  Through projects like this we are better able to understand the surrounding work environment and possible risk factors which may influence the potential for accidents in the work place.

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Steven Jackson, MBA's curator insight, November 4, 2013 7:06 PM

"Big data isn't just about helping retailers sell more products. Thanks to a project in development in Western Australia, it might also help reduce accidents on large mining and construction sites.

 

Synaptor's critical capability is its capacity to capture and manipulate live data, such as incoming reports of potential hazards like new potholes in roads or workers not wearing appropriate safety gear.


Synaptor analyses these reports and plots the data in real time on an interactive risk map, which is used to predict when and how an individual is most likely to be injured. It then generates an alert."
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Piper Alpha: In their own words

Piper Alpha: In their own words | Medic & OH&S on land and sea | Scoop.it
Survivors of the world's worst offshore oil disaster describe how the escaped the blazing Piper Alpha platform 25 years ago.
Glen Evans's insight:

With total failure of safety systems and where safety procedures led workers to a muster point which was to be a fatal decision, these types of disasters should  provide insight for Companies, Designers, Engineers and OH&S personnel with a worst case scenario and thus improve implementation of safety systems of offshore platforms. 

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Fatal Injuries in Offshore Oil and Gas Operations US 2003–2010

Fatal Injuries in Offshore Oil and Gas Operations US 2003–2010 | Medic & OH&S on land and sea | Scoop.it
During 2003–2010, the U.S. oil and gas extraction industry (onshore and offshore, combined) had a collective fatality rate seven times higher than for all U.S. workers (27.1 versus 3.8 deaths per 1...
Glen Evans's insight:

Even though there is mandatory Basic Offshore Safety Induction and Emergency Training, to aid offshore workers in the event of a air transport crash, namely a helicopter crash, the transportation of these workers to and from work remains the biggest threat to the workers life.   

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Rescooped by Glen Evans from OCHS as a Paramedic
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Fatigued paramedics fear for safety of patients

Fatigued paramedics fear for safety of patients | Medic & OH&S on land and sea | Scoop.it
Leaked Ambulance Victoria report concludes paramedics have been recording fatigue levels that equate to a blood-alcohol reading more than twice the legal limit - and that patients' lives are being risked.

Via Rebecca Poole
Glen Evans's insight:

In any industry that runs 12 hour shifts there is the  potential for fatigue related incidents. The Emergency services are not immune to this potential and with such a demanding job that requires focus and in some cases a lot of physical effort, fatigue can only be to the detriment of the Patients.   

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Rebecca Poole's curator insight, March 8, 2014 3:04 AM

This article shows the major potential for poor patient outcomes in immediate relation to the over- working and lack of fatigue management in the Victoria Ambulance Service. With an hour or more over run of a 12 hour shift being the norm down there. It's a wonder that there have not been more poor outcomes for patients in relation to fatigued paramedics - or maybe they are just being undocumented.

Rescooped by Glen Evans from OHS Quest in Mining, Construction and Oil & Gas Industry
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Too many are dying in mining accidents - Northern Star

Too many are dying in mining accidents - Northern Star | Medic & OH&S on land and sea | Scoop.it
Too many are dying in mining accidents
Northern Star
TOO MANY mine workers are being killed on Australian operations and too many of those are contractors.

Via Nicholas Rowland
Glen Evans's insight:

This article shows that contractors especially smaller companies with less experience in the development and implementation in their own safety procedures are a big factor when it comes to deaths on mine sites. The human factor must always play a part and education in regard to safety especially with big industry, with large unforgiving equipment at work, is one of the most important tools given to workers.  

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Lyle Dighton's curator insight, March 14, 2014 8:35 AM

An insufficient knowledge of OHS practices and standards is why the mining industry is claiming the mentioned fatalities. Ongoing safety awareness training and education should be made more available for mining personnel to utilise. Another method of preventing deaths could also involve safety professionals working with personnel more often than against them (working together to achieve effective safety outcomes).

Mark Brodie's curator insight, August 3, 2015 9:17 PM

An insufficient knowledge of OHS practices and standards is why the mining industry is claiming the mentioned fatalities. Ongoing safety awareness training and education should be made more available for mining personnel to utilise. Another method of preventing deaths could also involve safety professionals working with personnel more often than against them (working together to achieve effective safety outcomes).

lee matthews's curator insight, March 15, 2017 4:56 AM
In the future I would love to work on a mine site, and yes as the article states "they are dangerous". However with proper training and education around procedures and equipment this can be drastically minimised. But..... what if this was not the case due to need or indeed duty of care. This article particularly touches base with me as I have been in the civil industry for some time and seen what poorly arranged and ill equipped contracts and  labour hire can do. Traditionally you would start with a company and be taught from the ground up. You would care for your employees and take them from job to job where applicable. This meant that you knew their skill levels, what they were capable of and also most importantly their level of training as it was done "in house". I personally believe this created "all round" workers with solid foundations of knowledge. It also gave the worker a sense of security and longer term purpose, to which the worker would return in loyalty and knowledge obtained over time of employment.
With the introduction of labour hire and contractors into a highly competitive and often profitable environment this changed, I believe for the worst. Jobs once again became about profit and as a result machine maintenance, employee education, job stability and pay rates diminished while keeping the mirage that production and profits were all on track. Yet workplace accidents rose? So who is to blame? Surely not the principle contractor who head hunted the cheapest contract... what about the embattled contractor who didn't read the fine lines in his contract and is battling to meet deadline, find operators and stay afloat? Should jobs then be won from a safety stand point? Would that not promote companies to cover up incidents in order to win contracts?  I might not know the answer to these question but ,I sure know who ends up suffering until we get it right. Me and you the humble worker who just wants food on the table and to see their family EVERY night.
Rescooped by Glen Evans from China Mining Accidents
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Coal Mining in China By The Numbers

Coal Mining in China By The Numbers | Medic & OH&S on land and sea | Scoop.it

Good summary on the situation of accidents in China's coal mining.

The author also brings a little infographic illustrating how these casualties compare with other disasters.


Via Augis Barkov
Glen Evans's insight:

OH&S is part of a working culture in Australia, which continues to evolve, but in certain parts of the world it is in its infancy or even non existent to the detriment of the workers.  If Companies recognise the benefits of a safe working environment, they may start to implement change.

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Rescooped by Glen Evans from Safety Controlling the unpredictable Ohs in practice
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Piper Alpha: the legacy remains

Piper Alpha: the legacy remains | Medic & OH&S on land and sea | Scoop.it
On 6 July 1988, several enormous gas explosions and a subsequent fire killed 167 men at the Piper Alpha oil platform in the North Sea, 200km east of Wick.

Via Dennis Finlayson
Glen Evans's insight:

A dilemma which each OH&S employee may face where the health and safety of the workers comes second to the operational cost of a Company.

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Dennis Finlayson's curator insight, February 28, 2014 4:42 AM

This was a tragedy of epic proportions. This is something that could have been avoided if appropriate safety management systems where in place and effectively utilised. The underlying problem however with Piper Alpha is the fact that operational expenditure came before the crew's safety. Evidently this is an ongoing issue within the oil and mineral industry. A key question that is raised by this disaster is have the industry power brokers learnt from this disaster? 

This case study was used in my studies towards a Diploma in OHS. As a result I have spent a considerable amount of time researching the causative factors behind this disaster.

 

Rescooped by Glen Evans from Energy Science
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Report Reviews Impact of Oil, Gas Drilling Accidents on EU Fisheries

Report Reviews Impact of Oil, Gas Drilling Accidents on EU Fisheries | Medic & OH&S on land and sea | Scoop.it

“The Impact of Oil & Gas Drilling Accidents on EU Fisheries” (pdf) report by Dr David Green and Dr Cristina Gomez of the University of Aberdeen’s Institute for Coastal Science and Management (AICSM) provides for the first time a review of oil and gas related incidents and accidents in relation to fisheries in EU waters. http://bit.ly/McoSSJ


Via The Daily Fusion
Glen Evans's insight:

The impact on incidents with oil and gas offshore rigs not only effect the workers on board but also have a tremendous impact on the environment, which can have a trickle down effect on marine life and impact on a cross section of industries not related to the oil and gas industry. 

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