Family and Friends in OH&S
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Gej, the abseiler

Gej, the abseiler | Family and Friends in OH&S | Scoop.it
Michael Tomlinson's insight:

This is my old Scout leader Garry, “Gej”. One of his favourite pass times is abseiling, which he has been doing for over 20 years, and is now a level three instructor for abseiling.

 

Obviously, there are many risks associated with this sport. They include;

-Falling from cliffs.

-Burns.

-Rolled ankles, trips and falls.

-Scrapes, bumps, bruises, blisters (minor injuries).

-Broken bones and head injuries (major injuries).

-Exposure to the elements.

-Dehydration.

-Fatigue.

-Loss of circulation (and ultimately blood poisoning if a person is stuck in a harness for too long).


To avoid any of these from happening he must;

-Know how to perform rescues, and self-rescues.

-Wear appropriate safety gear (e.g. helmet, and gloves)

-Keep a safe distance from cliff edges (3m+) without a safety line attached.

-Using correct, well tied knots and anchor points, and having them checked over by another competent person.

-Being prepared for any unfavourable weather.

-A good knowledge of first aid.

-Carrying in plenty of feed and water.

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How to Wash a Climbing Rope | BasicRockClimbing.com

How to Wash a Climbing Rope | BasicRockClimbing.com | Family and Friends in OH&S | Scoop.it
How to easily wash a climbing rope step by step using three methods: 1. top-load washing machine, 2. front-load washing machine, and 3. hand wash.
Michael Tomlinson's insight:

Keeping abseiling rope clean and dry is very important. If a rope is left dirty or wet it will deteriorate, and eventually become unusable (and potentially deadly if the user doesn't realise this and attempts to use it). Whilst keeping hardware safe basically comes down to not dropping it, ropes can be more complicated. This site shows three different ways to correctly clean and dray a rope. This will ultimately increase it's lifespan, and keep it working safely.

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Climbing Knots | How to Tie Climbing Knots | Animated Climbing Knots

Climbing Knots | How to Tie Climbing Knots | Animated Climbing Knots | Family and Friends in OH&S | Scoop.it
Animated Knots by Grog - index of climbing knots
Michael Tomlinson's insight:

Knowing what knots to use for a given situation, and how to properly tie them is imperative when abseiling. It is something that every abseiler should be able to do blindfolded with their hands behind their backs. This site has good descriptions and diagrams on how to tie, and when to use many of the knots you will need whilst abseiling.

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Corey, the caver

Corey, the caver | Family and Friends in OH&S | Scoop.it
Michael Tomlinson's insight:

Corey is another one of my friends with lots of experience in caving. He and I have been caving together for five years now, and have both accumulated over 100 hours caving time each.

 

There are many risks that must be kept in mind whilst caving. These include;

-Over exertion.

-Dehydration.

-Rolled ankles, trips and falls.

-Scrapes, bumps, bruises, blisters (minor injuries).

-Broken bones and head injuries (major injuries).

-Gas inhalation.

-Becoming lost.


These are all easy to prevent by using;

-Appropriate, well maintained gear.

-Wearing safety gear (helmet, overalls, gloves, etc.).

-Carrying spare batteries, at least three sources of light and plenty of spare water and food.

-Keeping a good situational awareness.

-Correct use of caving maps.

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Grant, the glider pilot

Grant, the glider pilot | Family and Friends in OH&S | Scoop.it
Michael Tomlinson's insight:

Here is one of my gliding instructors, Grant. He has been flying gliders for 8 years, and has achieved a level 1 flight instructor ranking. The main risks he must be aware of are;

-Collisions, both on the ground and in the air.

-A person being stuck or tied up in the winch rope, or being struck by it.

-Aircraft failure due to wear and tear/maintenance.

 

To prevent these when flying gliders, and acting as ground crew, he must;

-Keep a good lookout for other aircraft, both whilst flying and as acting ground crew.

-Know, and follow the correct protocols and actions to follow them appropriately.

-Maintain a strong situational awareness whilst flying, e.g., ensuring you always have enough altitude to make it back to a safe landing place.

-Ensure that proper maintenance and inspections are performed on the aircraft and winch rope before each flight.

 

By following these he can prevent any problem associated with the flying, and the ultimate aim is to take off, fly, and return to land safely.

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Safer Abseiling

Safer Abseiling | Family and Friends in OH&S | Scoop.it
Michael Tomlinson's insight:

Failing to ensure that there are safeties, backups, and that correct methods are used, or a combination of the three are the biggest causes of accidents and deaths in the abseiling community. This article shows heaps of real life scenarios that have happened, and how they could have been prevented.

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Abseiling Safety Techniques

Abseiling Safety Techniques | Family and Friends in OH&S | Scoop.it
Abseiling has always been one of those things that has presented climbers with more degrees of danger than the
climb itself. Lack of concentration after a long day, anchor points not being up to their job and once hanging the rope you don’t have much space to run away if a rock decides to depart from the rock face.
Michael Tomlinson's insight:

Using an appropriate set up for an abseil is of the utmost importance. This article gives several scenarios of what could happen when abseiling on a particularly popular set up, that is ultimately wrong for the job, and results in long and tedious rescues having to be performed. It then goes on to suggest a more appropriate set up for the scenarios, which are far superior in the event of an accident.

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How to set up a releasable abseil - YouTube

Make sure annotations are turned on! Uploaded as part of an assessment for a module in a Sport Science (ODA) degree at Bangor University (JXH-3030)
Michael Tomlinson's insight:

When abseiling with novices, or when using the same abseil many times throughout the day it may be a good idea to use a releasable abseil. A releasable abseil allows the person on belay to quickly and easily stop the abseiler and lower them to the ground. This is by far the easiest and best way to get the abseiler out of harm's way.

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Rex, the hiker

Rex, the hiker | Family and Friends in OH&S | Scoop.it
Michael Tomlinson's insight:

Here is my friend “Rex”. One of his past times, as is mine, is hiking. We have been on many hikes together, all without accident.

 

Some risks associated with hiking are;

-Over exertion, either from pushing yourself too far or carrying too heavy a load.

-Dehydration.

-Rolled ankles, trips and falls.

-Exposure to the elements.

-Scrapes, bumps, bruises, blisters (minor injuries).

-Broken bones, burns, food/water poisoning (major injuries/sickness’s).

-Becoming lost.


All of these risks are easily overcome with basic camping/survival knowledge such as;

-First Aid.

-Navigation skills.

-Knowing your own limits and those of others in your group.

-Using appropriate gear, and clothing, and not bringing too much unusable weight.

-Carrying good, nutritious foods.

-Purifying water correctly.

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Jake, the fire-fighter

Jake, the fire-fighter | Family and Friends in OH&S | Scoop.it
Michael Tomlinson's insight:

This is my friend Jake. He is a volunteer fire-fighter in the Raglan Fire Brigade, and has been working with them for the past three years.

 

There are many hazards that he needs to be aware of whilst working, and training with his crew. These include;

-Being conscious of fire, heat and smoke in the area, and being able to avoid injuries directly related to them.

-Situational awareness, injuries from tripping and falling branches are some of the most common accidents among fire-fighters.

-Physical fitness is another risk that he has to be aware of. Heart attacks in some of the older members is another leading cause of injury and death amongst volunteer fire-fighters.

-Dehydration is a major issue as well, working in mostly hot and stressful situations it is important for him to keep hydrated.

 

All fire-fighters are trained in first aid and how to safely carry out their job. Whilst it is a high risk environment injuries and deaths are relatively low.

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