Growth Mindset
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Rescooped by Mary Anne Moran from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
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These Are The 16 Attributes of The Modern Educator ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

These Are The 16 Attributes of The Modern Educator ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Growth Mindset | Scoop.it
As teachers and educators, we are constantly required to review, evaluate and renew our teaching strategies to align them with  the cultural, technological and pedagogical ethos of the era we are living in. In today's era, the digital component is at the foreground which obviously calls for a new mindset, a novel conceptual framework that views technology not as an end itself but solely a mean to an educational end. It is a truism that digitally has opened a new horizon of unprecedented learning opportunities and experiences  but we can only tap into its full educational potential when we equip ourselves with the proper mindset: a growth and open mindset that as much as it adapts it also disrupts the century-old orthodoxies underlying teaching and learning practice. Teaching is a dynamic concept which is constantly evolving and expanding and that is why teachers and educators are forever learners.

Engaging in such a life-long learning journey entails that teachers develop a set of robust thinking habits that allow them to fit in the rapidly evolving educational landscape.These habits are, according to Reid Wilson, what make the profile of a modern educator. Below is an awesome visual created by Wilson featuring some of the characteristics of a modern teacher which I want to bring to your attention. Have a look and share with us what you think of it. Enjoy

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Growth Mindset Reflective Questions for Teachers ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Growth Mindset Reflective Questions for Teachers ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Growth Mindset | Scoop.it

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Amy Burns's curator insight, December 10, 2014 7:24 PM

Excellent reflective questions to contemplate.

Manuel Reyes's curator insight, December 10, 2014 9:34 PM

Important

Rescooped by Mary Anne Moran from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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Carol Dweck: 'The whole idea of growth mindset is to say yes they can'

Carol Dweck: 'The whole idea of growth mindset is to say yes they can' | Growth Mindset | Scoop.it
Carol Dweck is education’s guru of the moment. The US academic’s “growth mindset” theory has taken schools on both sides of the Atlantic by storm. When TES met the Stanford University psychology professor at the Festival of Education at Wellington College last week, the mere mention of her name was sending teachers into shivers of excitement.  But the woman herself is refreshingly modest about the success of her philosophy. “You never know how influential your idea is going to be,” she says, smi

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Rescooped by Mary Anne Moran from Into the Driver's Seat
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Growth Mindset Made Visible ^ Teaching Channel ^ by Carissa Romero

Growth Mindset Made Visible ^ Teaching Channel ^ by Carissa Romero | Growth Mindset | Scoop.it
Why do some students thrive in the face of challenges, while others fall apart? One reason is because students have different beliefs about the nature of intelligence. These beliefs serve as lenses through which students interpret their experiences in school, particularly experiences of adversity.

People with a fixed mindset believe intelligence is innate. This belief can make school a threatening place. It becomes a place to go to learn how smart you are — or how smart you’re not. People with a growth mindset, on the other hand, believe intelligence can be developed. For these students, school can be an exciting place, as it provides them with an opportunity to learn and develop their intelligence.


Numerous studies detail what happens when students have a growth mindset, but even when research tells us which practices help students develop a growth mindset, many educators still want to know what it looks like in the classroom.

To help educators learn more about mindsets and practices that help students develop them, Stanford University PERTS (Project for Education Research That Scales) is developing the Mindset Kit. Teaching Channel and PERTS partnered on two videos for the Mindset Kit to show growth mindset practices in action:

Praising the Process
Encouraging Students to Persist Through Challenges

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Mindset Learning

Mindset Learning | Growth Mindset | Scoop.it
Discover some of the strategies of mindset learning and how it can change education.

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Rescooped by Mary Anne Moran from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
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The Innovator's Mindset - Connected Principals

The Innovator's Mindset - Connected Principals | Growth Mindset | Scoop.it
Carol Dweck’s famous book, “Mindset”, was one that was (is) hugely popular with educators, not only in helping shape their work and thoughts on students, but also pushing learning in educator with their peers.  There were two simple concepts shared that resonated with many readers; the “fixed” mindset and the “growth” mindset.

Here is how the two differ according to Dweck:

“In a fixed mindset students believe their basic abilities, their intelligence, their talents, are just fixed traits. They have a certain amount and that’s that, and then their goal becomes to look smart all the time and never look dumb. In a growth mindset students understand that their talents and abilities can be developed through effort, good teaching and persistence. They don’t necessarily think everyone’s the same or anyone can be Einstein, but they believe everyone can get smarter if they work at it.”

The great thing about Dweck’s work is that she found that you can move from one to the other.  You may have a fixed mindset, but it is not necessarily a permanent thing.  The other aspect is that you do not necessarily have a “fixed” or “growth” mindset and fall into one of those two categories in all elements.  I have a growth mindset on (most things) education, but have a fixed mindset on fixing things around my house.

So what I have been thinking about lately is the notion of the “innovator’s mindset”.  This would actually go one step past the notion of a growth mindset and is looking at what you are creating with your learning.  SImply it would go look this:

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Rescooped by Mary Anne Moran from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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Changing the Mindset of Education: Every Learner is Unique

Changing the Mindset of Education: Every Learner is Unique | Growth Mindset | Scoop.it
By Arina Bokas & Rod Rock - Every learner is unique, and adopting a growth mindset in education is important, the authors argue. One size doesn't fit all.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Dr. Deborah Brennan's curator insight, May 30, 2015 9:51 AM

Gifted education often talks about the twice-exceptional learner - one whose intellectual gifts are coupled and often masked by a learning disability.  There is also a phenomena of the gifted student who lives in a state of poverty.  Often trapped in a high poverty school that focuses on remediation and intervention.  Poverty schools must embrace a growth mindset about students, believing that every student can develop their gifts and talents.  They must differentiate the learning experiences that provide pathways for students to access deeper learning with complex thinking within the content.  This is a tall order for teachers who are burdened with learning gaps, behavior problems, and social issues...but with over 50% of our students living in poverty, we cannot afford to miss the development of the gifts and talents that lie buried under poverty.

Tony Guzman's curator insight, May 30, 2015 7:36 PM

This article shares the idea on how all learners are not the same, we need to strive to teach to all their styles as best possible.

Kiruthika Ragupathi's curator insight, February 4, 2016 4:01 AM

How do we develop the "Growth mindset" in us -- to see intelligence as something that can be cultivated: the more learning we do, the smarter we become

Rescooped by Mary Anne Moran from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
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Developing a Growth Mindset in Teachers and Staff | Keith Heggart Blog | Edutopia.org

Developing a Growth Mindset in Teachers and Staff | Keith Heggart Blog | Edutopia.org | Growth Mindset | Scoop.it

An idea that is beginning to gain a lot of favour in educational circles at the moment is the notion of fixed versus growth mindsets, and how they might relate to students and learning. Based on the work of Stanford University psychologist, Carol Dweck, the idea of mindset is related to our understanding of where ability comes from. It has recently been seized upon by educators as a tool to explore our knowledge of student achievement, and ways that such achievement might be improved.

However, in my work, I have found that the notion of developing a growth mindset is as equally applicable to staff and teacher performance as it is to students. This article begins with a brief discussion about the difference between the two mindsets, what that means for education, and concludes with some ideas for how school leaders might seek to develop a growth mindset amongst their staff.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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