Obsessive Compulsive Disorder
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(Obsessive Compulsive Disorder) and What Can be Done About It?

(Obsessive Compulsive Disorder) and What Can be Done About It? | Obsessive Compulsive Disorder | Scoop.it
Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) involves feelings, thoughts and behaviors. For many people with OCD, the feeling of anxiety stands out as prominent. For example, a man with OCD might have an obsessive thought ...
Sean McCormack's insight:

Sean McCormack’s insight:

This article on OCD focused on showing us what actually is considered OCD and what treatment options are available. It was said that effective treatment methods include cognitive behavioral therapy and medications. This information was also found in my both of my research articles (National Alliance on Mental Illness, 2012) (National Institute of Mental Health, 2014). The conclusions in this blog post appear to be reasonable because the writer said things that appeared in other reputable sources, however the writer did not actually include his sources we do not know where their information came from and if their sources are really reputable. The article clarifies that OCD is not the bit of perfectionism you might have, as many people claim. This claim has been perpetuated by word of mouth (Lilienfeld, Lynn, Ruscio, & Beyerstein, 2010). This article however did not mention diversity, it implied that this information was relevant to everyone. However, would this same information still apply to different ethnic groups or LGBTQ people?

                                                     

Sources

Lilienfeld, S. O., Lynn, S. J., Ruscio, J., & Beyerstein, B. L. (2010). 50 great myths of popular psychology: Shattering widespread misconceptions about human behavior. Chichester, West Sussex: Wiley-Blackwell.

NAMI. (2012). Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. Retrieved from http://www.nami.org/Template.cfm?Section=By_Illness&Template=/ContentManagement/ContentDisplay.cfm&ContentID=142546

NIMH. (2014). Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, OCD. Retrieved from http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/obsessive-compulsive-disorder-ocd/index.shtml

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That’s Not OCD, You’re Just a Slacker

That’s Not OCD, You’re Just a Slacker | Obsessive Compulsive Disorder | Scoop.it
Of all the random pictures floating about the internet that I've run into in the past few weeks, this is the one that really got me:

Here's the text:

A 23-yea
Sean McCormack's insight:

Sean McCormack’s insight:

This blog post talked about what we as society might consider OCD and how we perceive it. With all of the media that talks about OCD, we may not understand how complex it is (Lilienfeld, Lynn, Ruscio, & Beyerstein, 2010). Working hard compared to a bunch of slackers doesn’t mean that you have OCD (Meyers, 2014). This information in this blog was consistent with reputable sources, Meyers (2014) says the difference between us and the people that actually have OCD is on a much bigger scale and it controls them. Once the behavior or thought becomes so intrusive that it has a significant effect on your life is when it becomes labeled as OCD (Meyers, 2014).  The author did not mention diversity in his blog post and it and this could make us think that these concepts apply to everyone.

 

Sources

Lilienfeld, S. O., Lynn, S. J., Ruscio, J., & Beyerstein, B. L. (2010). 50 great myths of popular psychology: Shattering widespread misconceptions about human behavior. Chichester, West Sussex: Wiley-Blackwell.

Myers, D. G. (2014). Exploring psychology in modules: With updates on dsm-5. S.l.: Worth Pub.

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Do You Have OCD? - YouTube

We talk about what Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is. GMM 469! Good Mythical MORE: http://youtu.be/IJcqi-IB5nQ Watch "My OCD" here: http://youtu.be/tnzz-eFmKa...

Via Collection of First, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Sean McCormack's insight:

Sean McCormack’s insight:

This video post talked about what defines OCD as a disorder, and the information that was presented in the video was also found in reputable sources such as in Meyers (2014). At times we can all obsess about certain things, but people that actually have OCD become consumed by their compulsions. In the video, they talk about how it seems to be common for people to say they have OCD when they feel the urge to make things right. This is from the overuse of representativeness (Lilienfeld, Lynn, Ruscio, & Beyerstein, 2010). People who actually have OCD get torn by these things (National Alliance on Mental Illness, 2012).  The two in the video did not mention diversity in their video. Without this we do not know if people of all races are effected in the same way by this.

 

Sources

Lilienfeld, S. O., Lynn, S. J., Ruscio, J., & Beyerstein, B. L. (2010). 50 great myths of popular psychology: Shattering widespread misconceptions about human behavior. Chichester, West Sussex: Wiley-Blackwell.

Myers, D. G. (2014). Exploring psychology in modules: With updates on dsm-5. S.l.: Worth Pub.

NAMI. (2012). Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. Retrieved from http://www.nami.org/Template.cfm?Section=By_Illness&Template=/ContentManagement/ContentDisplay.cfm&ContentID=142546

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Erika Collins's curator insight, December 9, 2014 11:22 PM

I think it's a bit ironic that this video is supposed to be bringing awareness to OCD and the fact that is shouldn't be joked about or "taken lightly" as the men say in it, but the music video they made that keeps being mentioned in this video is a comedic video that shows how OCD is in reality. To me, it's a bit counterintuitive. Although they present a lot of concepts that I believe can help raise awareness for this disorder and prevent it being the brunt of jokes, I also think they could have done a better job of avoiding making it a comedic music video and could have made it more serious. 

 

Some of the things they mention in this video that really paralleled the other articles I read were that there are different types of OCD, which seems to be a theme in many of the articles on here (Weg, 2011). Seeing as the makers of the video have such a large fan base, I think it's amazing that they're able to convey all these facts to the public that maybe aren't recognized. For instance, the fact that OCD isn't just about neatness and cleanliness, but can also be concerned with repetition of actions (Weg, 2011). 

 

In the other article that I want to relate to this video, titled "Living with OCD: Why Are We So 'Obsessed' With OCD?" written by Allen Weg, he talks a lot about the fact that in the United States, we often joke about OCD but we shouldn't be (Weg, 2011). He shows through popular phrases (especially in adolescents) that as a society, we are 'obsessed' with taking this disorder casually, and that, that needs to change (Weg, 2011). In the video, I think the makers are attempting to raise awareness for the same cause, but I don't think they successfully achieve it like Weg does. Their video makes me think less of them. The quality of their information seems to be accurate but the way they went about raising awareness is surprising to me. 

 

Since they went on a full tangent about the different types of OCD, I do believe they successfully covered some diverse aspects of the disorder, however they didn't mention other cultures or ethnicities, but neither did Weg. The information that is portrayed and talked about in the video could have an impact on the people they watch it, because they may also be a bit confused about the way it was presented, or they could be appreciative that such a popular producer of YouTube videos even took the time to talk about OCD in our society. 

 

References:

 

Weg, A. (2011, May 5). Living with OCD. Retrieved from http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/living-ocd/201105/why-are-we-so-obsessed-ocd ;

 

Weg, A. (2011, July 16). Living with OCD. Retrieved from http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/living-ocd/201107/the-many-flavors-ocd ;

 

(note: these are two separate articles by the same author)

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Children, Rituals, and OCD - PsychCentral.com

Children, Rituals, and OCD - PsychCentral.com | Obsessive Compulsive Disorder | Scoop.it
When my older daughter was about 2 or 3 years old, she had a bedtime ritual where she lined up 10 of her dolls and stuffed animals on the floor.
Sean McCormack's insight:

Sean McCormack’s insight:

This article talked about the diagnosis of OCD especially in early childhood. It said that we have to recognize rituals but distinguish them from OCD, which is much more serious (Meyers, 2014). If we do not distinguish the difference between simply rituals and OCD, people tend to commonly think that it is OCD through illusionary correlation (Lilienfeld, Lynn, Ruscio, & Beyerstein, 2010). The conclusions in this blog post appear to be reasonable because the writer said things that appeared in other reputable sources. It was said that OCD usually appears in early childhood (National Institute of Mental Health, 2014). It was also said OCD is often misdiagnosed (National Alliance on Mental Illness, 2012). This article did not include any sources, so we have to be aware that we don’t know where they got their information from. This article lacked diversity as it only talked about children, although OCD typically develops in childhood it can show up in adults as well. In addition the child used as an example in the article was white, the article did not mention if this would be different for different ethnic groups.

 

Sources

Lilienfeld, S. O., Lynn, S. J., Ruscio, J., & Beyerstein, B. L. (2010). 50 great myths of popular psychology: Shattering widespread misconceptions about human behavior. Chichester, West Sussex: Wiley-Blackwell.

Myers, D. G. (2014). Exploring psychology in modules: With updates on dsm-5. S.l.: Worth Pub.

NAMI. (2012). Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. Retrieved from http://www.nami.org/Template.cfm?Section=By_Illness&Template=/ContentManagement/ContentDisplay.cfm&ContentID=142546

NIMH. (2014). Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, OCD. Retrieved from http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/obsessive-compulsive-disorder-ocd/index.shtml

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Multifaceted Causes of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder | Brain Blogger

Multifaceted Causes of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder | Brain Blogger | Obsessive Compulsive Disorder | Scoop.it
Multifaceted Causes of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Brain Blogger (blog) Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is an anxiety disorder which is characterized by intrusive thoughts (obsessions) that result in worry and repetitive behaviors...

Via up2-21, Collection of First, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Sean McCormack's insight:

Sean McCormack’s insight:

This article talked about the causes of OCD and treatments. The information in the article about the cause and treatments of OCD is the same as in other reputable sources (National Alliance on Mental Illness, 2012) (National Institute of Mental Health, 2014). The author of this piece has experience in psychology and a PhD in Molecular Biology. This would make him a credible person to talk about different medications and their effects, in addition he included his sources which come from two main journals. In this article the author tells us neurotransmitter dysregulation is correlated to the manifestation of OCD symptoms. He does a good job here by not using the word cause, from our psychology principles we know that correlation does not mean causation. The author does not mention any diversity other than age and he does not factor in if causes or treatments should be different for different races (Lilienfeld, Lynn, Ruscio, & Beyerstein, 2010).

 

Sources

Lilienfeld, S. O., Lynn, S. J., Ruscio, J., & Beyerstein, B. L. (2010). 50 great myths of popular psychology: Shattering widespread misconceptions about human behavior. Chichester, West Sussex: Wiley-Blackwell.

NAMI. (2012). Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. Retrieved from http://www.nami.org/Template.cfm?Section=By_Illness&Template=/ContentManagement/ContentDisplay.cfm&ContentID=142546

NIMH. (2014). Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, OCD. Retrieved from http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/obsessive-compulsive-disorder-ocd/index.shtml

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'My OCD is a burden,not a bragging point' - Daily Mail

'My OCD is a burden,not a bragging point' - Daily Mail | Obsessive Compulsive Disorder | Scoop.it
‘I’m so OCD’ has become a modern mantra. But this diminishes the overwhelming anxiety associated with genuine obsessive compulsive disorder as Charlotte Methven explains.
Sean McCormack's insight:

Sean McCormack’s insight:

This magazine article talked how it felt to have OCD. The author has been diagnosed with OCD and the things she says are also said in reliable sources such as in The National Institute of Mental Health (2014), it says that performing the obsessive behaviors don’t cause pleasure, only temporary relief from the anxiety that people with OCD feel. In the article she talks about how it seems to be common for people to say they have OCD when they feel the urge to make things right. People say this because of the overuse of representativeness (Lilienfeld, Lynn, Ruscio, & Beyerstein, 2010). The woman that wrote this article does not mention diversity. Because she does not mention diversity we do not know how this all applies to. It isn’t clear whether this applies to people of all cultures and ethnic backgrounds or just people from the United Kingdom.

 

Sources

Lilienfeld, S. O., Lynn, S. J., Ruscio, J., & Beyerstein, B. L. (2010). 50 great myths of popular psychology: Shattering widespread misconceptions about human behavior. Chichester, West Sussex: Wiley-Blackwell.

Myers, D. G. (2014). Exploring psychology in modules: With updates on dsm-5. S.l.: Worth Pub.

NAMI. (2012). Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. Retrieved from http://www.nami.org/Template.cfm?Section=By_Illness&Template=/ContentManagement/ContentDisplay.cfm&ContentID=142546

NIMH. (2014). Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, OCD. Retrieved from http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/obsessive-compulsive-disorder-ocd/index.shtml

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