NWT News
65.7K views | +3 today
Follow
News from Canada's Northwest Territories curated by @Northern_Clips [Full story? Click on headline]
Curated by Northern_Clips
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

SpectacularTourism Videos | Spectacular Northwest Territories #NWT

SpectacularTourism Videos | Spectacular Northwest Territories #NWT | NWT News | Scoop.it
Aurora; Attractions; Fishing; Adventure; Yellowknife & Our National Parks
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

Le Frolic Bistro Bar Restaurant Reviews, Yellowknife, Canada - TripAdvisor

Le Frolic Bistro Bar Restaurant Reviews, Yellowknife, Canada - TripAdvisor | NWT News | Scoop.it
Le Frolic Bistro Bar, Yellowknife: See 16 unbiased reviews of Le Frolic Bistro Bar, rated 3.0 of 5 on TripAdvisor and ranked #15 of 43 restaurants in Yellowknife.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

Fuego's Restaurant Reviews, Yellowknife, Canada - TripAdvisor

Fuego's Restaurant Reviews, Yellowknife, Canada - TripAdvisor | NWT News | Scoop.it
Fuego's, Yellowknife: See 10 unbiased reviews of Fuego's, rated 4.0 of 5 on TripAdvisor and ranked #2 of 43 restaurants in Yellowknife.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

Bullocks' Bistro Restaurant Reviews, Yellowknife, Canada - TripAdvisor

Bullocks' Bistro Restaurant Reviews, Yellowknife, Canada - TripAdvisor | NWT News | Scoop.it
Bullocks' Bistro, Yellowknife: See 29 unbiased reviews of Bullocks' Bistro, rated 3.5 of 5 on TripAdvisor and ranked #5 of 43 restaurants in Yellowknife.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

#YZF #NWT Bird watchers of a feather, flock together

#YZF #NWT Bird watchers of a feather, flock together | NWT News | Scoop.it
From right: Lynn Hjartarson, Patricia Baldwin, Shannon Ripley, Christine Wenman and Catherine Pigott use binoculars to get a closer look at the many varieties of birds on Niven Lake. - Heather Lange/NNSL photo

[excerpt]
Eighteen bird watchers came out with binoculars in hand, to check out what they could see during the annual Spring Bird Walk on Sunday.

This was the 19th year for the Spring Bird Walk. The outing, which is usually held on Mother's Day, was delayed until May 29 due to the cold weather. There were a total of 48 species of birds reported, up from 33 last year.

The bird watchers, or "twitchers" as they are referred to in Britain, started their walk on Niven Lake, the most highly bird-populated lake in town because of its history as a former sewage lagoon.

"Most lakes in the NWT are low in nutrients but because of the waste that was dumped into Niven Lake, it has produced a lot of nutrients and is the favourite breeding ground of migratory birds," said Vicky Johnston, the lead guide on the bird walk.

After Niven Lake, the bird watchers had lunch near an osprey nest located at the radio tower past the Dettah Road turn off on the Ingraham Trail. The group then went for a hike past Ranney Hill to Martin Lake off the Vee Lake Road.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

The Yellowknife Artist Run Community Centre (ARCC) is getting organized

The Yellowknife Artist Run Community Centre (ARCC) is getting organized | NWT News | Scoop.it
The new board of governors for the Yellowknife Artist Run Community Centre (ARCC) is made up of Jaimee Imrie, left, Lanny Cooke, Natasha Bhogal, Rosalind Mercredi, Batiste Foisy, Byron Sawatzky, Joel Maillet, Scott Lough, Matthew Grogono and Travis Mercredi. Missing from the photo are Nigit’stil Norbert and Dan Korver. The board was elected at the ARCC's first annual general meeting last Monday. - Adrian Lysenko/NNSL photo

SOMBA K'E/YELLOWKNIFE - The Yellowknife Artist Run Community Centre (ARCC) is moving forward. What started as a temporary loan of the use of the old Pentecostal Church on 49 Street has turned into a centre holding various community events surrounding the arts since its formation in March.

On Monday, the ARCC held its first annual general meeting, taking place in the building, with more than forty people attending to elect a board of governors, share some of the highlights of the past few months and outline goals for the future.

"I first came into this being granted this church for a temporary period of time and I remember saying if we could make people cry when this place came down we could achieve something," said Joel Maillet, board member.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

#Inuvik #NWT 'geographically gifted' for information economy

#Inuvik #NWT 'geographically gifted' for information economy | NWT News | Scoop.it
This summer the Town of Inuvik will survey land near the airport surrounding the two satellite remote sensing stations in hopes of developing the area for research and economic benefits.

At the council meeting on May 25, mayor Denny Rodgers announced the town and Natural Resources Canada will sign a memorandum of understanding stating that the federal department will pay for the survey. The town hopes to develop the area as a research area with up to 20 satellite remote-sensing stations, similar to Kiruna, Sweden which has 24 satellite dishes and a bustling economy built off it.

"The dishes have created a whole new industry there for tourism, conferences and research," Rodgers said. "If you build it, they will come. We could partner with Aurora Research Institute. Lots of researchers would want to come here."

Inuvik sits in a perfect location, geographically speaking. The 75 satellites that polar orbit the earth – from north pole to south pole – stay over Inuvik longer than anywhere else in the world, except for Kiruna, Sweden. By setting up a series of satellite dishes here, proponents could download more information more readily. Only one of the two dishes currently set up are active, but the German Space Agency is using it to download information for a three-year project.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

People in #NWT live shorter lives

SOMBA K'E/YELLOWKNIFE - With an average life expectancy of 81 years, Canadians live long lives.

However, in the North it's a different story.

According to a study released by the Conference Board of Canada last month, residents of the Northwest Territories live an average of 76.2 years, nearly four years less than the national average.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

Canadian Aboriginal syllabic writing

Canadian Aboriginal syllabic writing | NWT News | Scoop.it
Canadian Aboriginal syllabic writing, or simply syllabics, is a family of abugidas used to write a number of Aboriginal Canadian languages of the Algonquian, Inuit, and (formerly) Athabaskan language families.

Canadian syllabics are currently used to write all of the Cree dialects from Naskapi (spoken in Quebec) to the Rocky Mountains, including Eastern Cree, James Bay Cree, Swampy Cree and Plains Cree. They are also used to write Inuktitut in the eastern Canadian Arctic; there they are co-official with the Latin alphabet in the territory of Nunavut. They are used regionally for the other large Canadian Algonquian language, Ojibwe in Western Canada, as well as for Blackfoot, where they are obsolete. Among the Athabaskan languages further to the west, syllabics have been used at one point or another to write Dakelh (Carrier), Chipewyan, Slavey, Tli Cho (Dogrib), Tasttine (Beaver). Syllabics have occasionally been used in the United States by communities that straddle the border, but are principally a Canadian phenomenon.

* 1 Basic principles
o 1.1 Syllabic and final consonant forms
o 1.2 Vowel transformations
o 1.3 Punctuation
* 2 Glossary
o 2.1 "Syllables", or full-size letters
+ 2.1.1 Series
o 2.2 "Finals", or reduced letters
o 2.3 Diacritics
+ 2.3.1 Points and pointing
* 3 History
o 3.1 James Evans
o 3.2 Origins
o 3.3 Adoption and use
* 4 Variations
o 4.1 Central Algonquian
+ 4.1.1 Eastern vs western syllabics
+ 4.1.2 Additional consonant series
o 4.2 Inuktitut
o 4.3 Blackfoot
o 4.4 Carrier and other Athabaskan
* 5 Current usage
* 6 Unified Canadian Aboriginal Syllabics in Unicode
* 7 Notes
* 8 See also
* 9 References
* 10 External links
o 10.1 Free font downloads
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

Slavey #indigenous language of the #NWT

Slavey (also Slave, Slavé, pronounced /ˈsleɪvi/) is an Athabaskan language spoken among the Slavey First Nations of Canada in the Northwest Territories where it also has official status
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

Dogrib Dictionary Database #NWT #language #indigenous

This internet dictionary is based on the print version of the Dogrib Dictionary published in 1996 by the Dogrib Divisional Board of Education.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

Indigenous grandmothers visit Vermont's Capital City

Indigenous grandmothers visit Vermont's Capital City | NWT News | Scoop.it
Grandmothers from around the globe are in Montpelier this week promoting peace and social justice. [...] "They represent the whole world and the whole world of all the people, and they have come here which is just touching and moving to me. It's an honor to be in service to them this week," said Gwendolyn Hall Smith, one of the event's organizers.

The conference is being sponsored by the Montpelier-based Global Community Initiatives. The group is focused on achieving sustainable communities around the world. The grandmother's will travel to Brazil as their next stop on the world tour.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

Norman Wells spilled 90 barrels, substantially more than the four barrels originally reported.

Enbridge Inc. said Friday a leak on its Norman Wells oil pipeline spilled at least 90 barrels in the remote Northwest Territories, substantially more than the four barrels originally reported.

The company had discovered a leak on the 39,400 barrel per day line about 50 kilometres south of the community of Wrigley in early May but have yet to determine the cause.

"Third party experts are on-site and we are working to define the subsurface impacts," said spokeswoman Gina Jordan in an e-mail late Friday.

Read more: http://www.calgaryherald.com/Norman+Wells+spilled+barrels/4893777/story.html#ixzz1OLwZU4HF
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

Surly Bob's Restaurant Reviews, Yellowknife, Canada - TripAdvisor

Surly Bob's Restaurant Reviews, Yellowknife, Canada - TripAdvisor | NWT News | Scoop.it
Surly Bob's, Yellowknife: See 7 unbiased reviews of Surly Bob's, rated 3.5 of 5 on TripAdvisor and ranked #9 of 43 restaurants in Yellowknife.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

Diamante Restaurant Reviews, Yellowknife, Canada - TripAdvisor

Diamante Restaurant Reviews, Yellowknife, Canada - TripAdvisor | NWT News | Scoop.it
Diamante Restaurant, Yellowknife: See 5 unbiased reviews of Diamante Restaurant, rated 4.0 of 5 on TripAdvisor and ranked #4 of 43 restaurants in Yellowknife.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

Fuego's, Yellowknife Traveller Reviews - TripAdvisor

Fuego's, Yellowknife Traveller Reviews - TripAdvisor | NWT News | Scoop.it
[excerpt] When we arrived at the restaurant we were pleased with the atmosphere. That's where the pleasantries ended. The bartender informed us they don't have high chairs "because this really isn't a family restaurant but kids can stay so long as they stay in their seat". This guy actually asked us if our one year old would sit in a chair on his own!

We opted to stay as our kid is accustomed to eating out and I kept him in a sling.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

Katimavik builds #YZF #NWT "Wall against hunger"

Katimavik builds #YZF #NWT "Wall against hunger" | NWT News | Scoop.it
[excerpt] Katimavik, a youth volunteer program, called for canned food donations last week to be used as bricks in the wall. The food is going to the Yellowknife Food Bank.

The group supervisor said the wall-building was conducted in the fashion of a "flash mob."

"A flash mob is a group of people just kind of randomly coming together to do something together. In this case, it's building a wall made out of cans," said Liam O'Leary, leader of the group.

The call for canned food was in conjunction with World Hunger Awareness Day, which took place on May 31.

O'Leary was happy with the amount of food donations they received from Yellowknife residents.

"We collected 1,290 cans of food and dry goods plus cash donations, a great turn out," said O'Leary.

Ruby Trudel, a member of the board of directors for the Yellowknife Food Bank and founder of Food Rescue, said it is accessed by many people.

"In 2010 we averaged 130 basic hampers given out on distribution day. The hampers are filled with: 500 grams of pasta, pasta sauce, two cans of condensed soup, two cans of fruit, two cans of vegetables, tuna, pork and beans, instant noodles, and macaroni and cheese. We encourage people to donate these items," said Trudel.

She said the organization looks for those staple items rather than more "exotic" foods.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

N.W.T. literary anthology to be produced

N.W.T. literary anthology to be produced | NWT News | Scoop.it
De Beers Canada and the northWords Writers Festival are teaming up to produce a collection of poetry, fiction and non-fiction from writers in the Northwest Territories.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

McGill University: Ancient roots recognized in new First Nations graduation scarves : McGill Reporter

McGill University: Ancient roots recognized in new First Nations graduation scarves : McGill Reporter | NWT News | Scoop.it
Paige Isaac (B.Sc, 2008) Interim Coordinator First Peoples' House presents Loanna Zacharie (B.SW) with the new red scarf. Looking on is Linda Gabriel who is wearing a white scarf for her Certificate in Education for First Nations and Inuit. / Photo: Adam Scotti

Graduating from McGill will take on a deeper meaning for both the University and many Aboriginal students as a new scarf is introduced into convocation ceremonial dress. The scarf also represents an historic and symbolic gesture acknowledging the importance of Aboriginal students and their ties to the University.

The scarf, presented to graduating students at a ceremony on Tuesday evening, was born from one offered by the McGill’s First Peoples’ House to visiting Aboriginal alumni during the annual pow-wow. The combined efforts of First People’s House and Aboriginal outreach and awareness programs by the University administration and funding from the Quebec Ministry of Education led to a broad consultative process that now offers a specially designed scarf for graduating Aboriginal students.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

2011 Great Northern Arts Festival Workshops #Inuvik #NWT

2011 Great Northern Arts Festival Workshops #Inuvik #NWT | NWT News | Scoop.it
We feature over 65 workshops for the public over the course of the Festival. These are offered by our attending artists and run 2-8 hours in length. They cover a variety of subjects, styles and artforms and range from formal visual arts to literary and traditional performing arts.

We offered 35 workshops in 2010 and many provided an opportunity to create and keep one's own piece of professional art. 2010 workshops included carving, painting, beading, traditional arts, sewing, wood block printing, drawing, stained glass, writing, story-telling, throatsinging, drumming, songwriting, filmmaking, and many more. Workshops for children and families are also offered over the course of the event.

Workshops are extremely popular and are a strong drawing point for both local and travelling visitors to the Festival. Workshops are available for online registration; but book early, as many fill up quickly. Limited spots held for on-site walkup bookings.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

Broken Slavey a trade language used in the 19th century #NWT & #Yukon

Broken Slavey (also Broken Slavé, Broken Slave, Slavey Jargon, Broken Slavee, le Jargon esclave) is a trade language used between Indians and whites in the Yukon area (for example, in around Liard River and in the Mackenzie River district) in the 19th century.

Broken Slavey is based primarily on the Slavey language with elements from French, Cree, and perhaps to a lesser extent English. However, there is some disagreement among sources: Petitot (1889) states that it lacks English, Dene Suline (Chipewyan), or Gwich’in (Kutchin) elements in contrast to the neighbouring Loucheux Pidgin (a nearby trade language) while Dall (1870) states that it includes English elements and McClellan (1981) states that it contained Dene Suline influences. Later sources have ignored the earlier accounts and assumed that "Broken Slavey" is merely French vocabulary (loanwords) used in northern Athabascan languages. Michael Krauss has suggested that French loanwords in Athabascan languages may have been borrowed via Broken Slavey.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

Gwich’in language of the #NWT & the #Yukon

The Gwich’in language is the Athabaskan language of the Gwich’in indigenous people. It is also known in older or dialect-specific publications as Kutchin, Takudh, Tukudh, or Loucheux. In the Northwest Territories and Yukon of Canada, it is used principally in the towns of Inuvik, Aklavik, Fort McPherson, Old Crow, and Tsiigehtchic (formerly Arctic Red River). There are about 430 Gwich’in speakers in Canada out of a total Gwich’in population of 1,900.

In Alaska, Gwich’in is spoken in Beaver, Circle, Fort Yukon, Chalkyitsik, Birch Creek, Arctic Village, Eagle, and Venetie, Alaska. About 300 out of a total Alaska Gwich’in population of 1,100 speak the language.

It is an official language of the Northwest Territorie
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

$613.4 million over 5 years Indigenous budget bulletin 2011 | Australian Policy Online

$613.4 million over 5 years Indigenous budget bulletin 2011 | Australian Policy Online | NWT News | Scoop.it
Macroeconomics’ annual analysis of the Indigenous Budget highlights how difficult it is to track the effort to ‘Close the Gap’ across jurisdictions, portfolios, programs, and reports that too often highlight the lack of key data to measure progress.

The 2011-12 Budget provides $613.4 million over 5 years for Indigenous programs across several portfolios. Only $500 million of this is new money; the remainder is redirected from other Indigenous programs. Of these funds: $237.7 million is for health; $226.1 million is for education and training; $100.4 million is for employment; $34.0 million is for welfare reform; and $15.2 million is for broadcasting.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Northern_Clips
Scoop.it!

North Of 60 (theme remix) - GODSON

http://www.moartist.com/godson text VOTE GODSON to 79999
help Godson win a record deal with EMI. Vote everyday until June 12, 2011 & help bring the north to the national stage!
http://www.facebook.com/godsoncanada
http://www.twitter.com/godsoncanada
http://www.reverbnation.com/godsoncanada
http://www.myspace.com/godsoncanada
http://www.thegodson.com
more...
No comment yet.