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Students sample college experience #NWT's Aurora College has launched a new program to give high school students a taste of post-secondary life.

Students sample college experience #NWT's Aurora College has launched a new program to give high school students a taste of post-secondary life. | NWT News | Scoop.it
Patti Wedawin, a student from Gameti, finds out what it's like to be a carpenter during the NWT Youth Symposium at Aurora College in Fort Smith. - Paul Bickford/NNSL photo

[excerpt]

Thirty-eight young people from nine communities across the NWT were in Fort Smith from June 13 to 17 for the inaugural NWT Youth Symposium at Thebacha Campus.

The symposium focused on helping the Grade 10 to 11 students prepare for post-secondary education, and learn about opportunities at all three campuses of Aurora College.

Students rotated through workshops with different Aurora College instructors and graduates, and experienced programs such as carpentry, environment and natural resources, teacher education, business and health care, along with trying a simulator of driving mining equipment.

They also got to experience residence life, tour the campus and speak to student services staff.

Effie Gruben, a Grade 10 student from Tuktoyaktuk, enjoyed the experience.

"It was really interesting," said the 16-year-old. "I really liked carpentry. I didn't know that I would like carpentry because we don't really have it in our school."

Gruben welcomed the idea of the symposium.

"I think this is cool and I think that they should have more of this happening because students would get more information and they would be thinking about the future earlier," she said. "They would find their interests and what they would like to do. If you don't try something new, then you won't know what it's about."

Mahalia Mackeinzo, an 18-year-old Grade 11 student from Deline, also thinks the symposium is a good idea.

"It's really educating," she said. "You get a better perspective of what's here."

Cody Drygeese, a 17-year-old Grade 11 student from Yellowknife, actually said the experience at the symposium has started him thinking of studying carpentry.

Other students came from Aklavik, Gameti, Fort Simpson, Fort Providence, Hay River and Jean Marie River.

Jeff O'Keefe, director of Thebacha Campus, called the symposium an absolute success, noting students had an opportunity that a lot of them wouldn't have in their home communities.

"Our goal has been to expose kids from around the Northwest Territories to what programs we have to offer, to what post-secondary education is all about, to residence life, to campus life, and all those kinds of things," he explained.

O'Keefe said the symposium is about promoting all of the college's campuses and their programs, noting staff members were brought in from the other campuses.

The plan is to hold the symposium again next year.

The initiative cost the college about $100,000, of which 90 per cent went to travel.
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Home of the N.W.T. Mining Heritage Society | Flickr - Photo

(c) 2009 George Lessard MHS_Pano_Tif_01_CROP_V1_72dpi_JPG The home of the N.W.T. Mining Heritage Society - a group that is dedicated to preserving and promoting the mining heritage of the Northwest Territories.
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U.S policy harms people, kills more polar bears « Woods and Waters

U.S policy harms people, kills more polar bears « Woods and Waters | NWT News | Scoop.it
Ross and Karol Wallingford had traveled to Ulukhaktok, Northwest Territories, to hunt musk oxen. The Inuit guides who accompanied them on the hunt told them that the polar bear ban had greatly complicated life in the remote village.
“They said they used to make $30,000 or more for a single polar bear hunt,” Ross recounted. “By contrast, a musk ox hunt is only about $6,000. The guides said they were having to host five or six musk ox hunts to generate the revenue they used to generate from just one polar bear hunt.
“What’s really tragic about the situation is that the ban isn’t reducing the number of polar bears being killed. If anything, it’s increasing it.
“The villagers still get to kill a certain number of bears. In the past, they were able to make enough money to support the village by allowing hunters to kill just a few. Now, to make an equivalent amount of money, they have to kill several times more bears and sell the pelts to rich Russians for $6,000 to $7,000 apiece.”
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Victoria Storytellers' Guild: Storytellers Conference in Yellowknife, NWT

Victoria Storytellers' Guild: Storytellers Conference in Yellowknife, NWT | NWT News | Scoop.it
It was my great privilege to represent the Victoria Storytellers Guild (VSG) at the recent 19th Storytellers Conference in Yellowknife, NWT called Story North. Here are a few of the highlights.
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#YZF #NWT Harbour plan takes shape

#YZF #NWT Harbour plan takes shape | NWT News | Scoop.it
[excerpt] After a year spent mostly on reviewing time-worn reports, the committee charged with drafting a plan for managing Yellowknife harbour sailed into uncharted water this week. ... Yellowknifers will get their first look at proposals from the Planning Partners, the Toronto consultants hired to lead the two-year $400,000 process at focus group sessions scheduled for June 27 to 29 at city hall and at evening public meetings June 28 and 29 at Tree of Peace Friendship Centre.

Montgomery said the committee "felt happy with what they saw and encouraged that the process has advanced; there was a bit of a sense earlier that the background report was a lot of what people in Yellowknife had seen before and already know."

"The committee saw something that is more of a significant plan that the city can move forward with and develop partnerships around to create a long-term plan for the Yellowknife harbour."

Who will manage the harbour that reaches from the Yellowknife River to Dettah - an independent body or a city hall department, a key issue that consultants raised in their first report - will be canvassed during the focus group sessions and public meetings, Montgomery said.

"Those options will get fleshed out at the public meetings. The next stage will be a more public process through the focus groups and public meetings," she said.
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TODAY #YZF #NWT -Nine ART DEMOS @ Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre

Nine Yellowknife artists are presenting demonstrations of thier work from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.
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First Nations Canadian lands prime post in Australian state parliament

First Nations Canadian lands prime post in Australian state parliament | NWT News | Scoop.it
Just weeks after a Canadian federal election that saw a record-setting seven aboriginal MPs elected to the House of Commons, a First Nations politician from Ontario is also attracting national attention — in Australia — Former Toronto Star reporter Walt Secord, a Mohawk-Ojibway native from the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation near Brantford, Ont., has parlayed a successful but controversial 20-year career as an Australian Labor Party strategist into a coveted spot in the legislature of New South Wales, Australia's most populous and powerful state.

Read more: http://www.canada.com/news/First+Nations+Canadian+lands+prime+post+Australian+state+parliament/4965486/story.html#ixzz1PbPDADOG
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Canadian Wildlife Federation Awards, 2011 Conservation Achievement Awards in #YZF #NWT

OTTAWA, June 17, 2011 /CNW/ - The Canadian Wildlife Federation (CWF) is proud to announce the recipients of the 2011 Conservation Achievement Awards. Winners have been selected by the Canadian Wildlife Federation and will be awarded at the Annual General Meeting in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories on Saturday June 18, 2011.

The Conservation Achievement Awards honour individuals' or organizations commitments to wildlife in Canada. Nominees include volunteers, professionals, youth, and conservationists from all walks of life concerned with a host of environmental topics.

About Canadian Wildlife Federation:

CWF is dedicated to fostering awareness and appreciation of our natural world. By spreading knowledge of human impacts on the environment, sponsoring research, promoting the sustainable use of natural resources, recommending legislative changes, and cooperating with like-minded partners, CWF encourages a future in which Canadians may live in harmony with nature. Visit www.canadianwildlifefederation.ca for more information.
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Northern_Clips' Circumpolar Blog: Yellowknife's National Aboriginal Day Celebrations #YZF #NWT

Northern_Clips' Circumpolar Blog: Yellowknife's National Aboriginal Day Celebrations #YZF #NWT | NWT News | Scoop.it
National Aboriginal Day
>June 21st, 2011
>
>Join in the celebration!
>
>Location - Somba K'e Civic Plaza
>
>National Aboriginal Day Parade starts at 11:00am
>Ruth Inch Memorial Pool to Franklin Avenue
>
>Featuring:
>- Live Entertainment
>- Interactive Events
>- Cultural Interaction
>
>Buses from Somba Ke' Civic Plaza to
>Yellowknives Dene First Nation Cultural Grounds
>2:00pm o 3:30pm
>
>Join us at Somba K'e Civic Plaza for a Fish Fry Lunch at 12 Noon
>
>...bring a camping chair and blanket…make yourself at home!
>
>**parking is limited so please car pool.
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#NWT officially supports the Universal Declaration on the Ethical Harvest of Seals

#NWT officially supports the Universal Declaration on the Ethical Harvest of Seals | NWT News | Scoop.it
OTTAWA, June 16, 2011 – “This month marks the 141st anniversary of the Northwest Territories (NWT) becoming a Canadian territory. On this occasion, I proudly announce the support of the government of the NWT for the Universal Declaration on the Ethical Harvest of Seals,” said Senator Céline Hervieux-Payette.

On June 23, 1870, the Northwest Territories joined the Dominion of Canada. On July 15, 1870, they joined the Canadian Confederation.

In a letter to the Senator, Premier Floyd K. Roland officially granted the support of the Territory to the Declaration. “The NWT has a long history of promoting and supporting the humane harvest of our wildlife resources by all hunters and trappers.” The Premier emphasized that: “Wildlife in the NWT is managed-through co-management boards created by comprehensive aboriginal land claim agreements.”

The Government of the NWT is the third government to support to the Universal Declaration after the governments of Newfoundland and Labrador and Quebec.

Premier Roland’s letter is available on the Universal Declaration’s website (www.sealsonline.org) that serves as a rallying point for seal hunting communities. The site reports on all developments regarding the Universal Declaration. Users are invited to sign the online petition.
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Olympia Washington to Inuvik, #NWT June 23 to July 10 2011

Olympia Washington to Inuvik, #NWT  June 23 to July 10 2011 | NWT News | Scoop.it
This is the start of a trip report of a solo run from Olympia, Washington to Inuvik, Northwest Territories, and return. The run dates are June 23 to July 10 so at this point all I can talk about is anticipation, but there's enough of that to talk for a bit.

The Root of This Madness

I suppose that in any trip like this, the first question to settle is, why? Of course anyone who's ever hopped onto a motorcycle and wandered off through unknown lands for a while knows that is an easy question, except that there is something more. There is something that says "Inuvik" instead of "Halifax" or "La Paz" or "Veracruz," something that sets this trip apart from all the other things that could have used up this precious 17-day respite from gainful employment. It's called the Arctic.

I have had a long and largely imaginary relationship with the arctic. When I was a kid I read stories about Peary, Amundsen, Nansen and that lot, and have kept picking up those old books ever since. In high school I started climbing mountains seriously and one of my climbing buddies had recently been putting up first ascents in the Arrigetch Peaks, one of the tougher neighborhoods in the Brooks Range, and I dearly wanted to go there, but it wasn't going to happen on a high school kid's income. Later I read Robert Service's poems about the Yukon, and right after college I did a sojourn in DC as an activist for protection of Alaska wilderness, which was, along the Native Claims Settlement Act, the main environmental achievement of the Carter administration. So that was a virtual dousing in Arctic waters, but still I had never been north of border Canada.

Fate's compass turned north at last in 1991, when I was doing graduate work with a woman who was the guru of postglacial climate and vegetation in Beringia, and for two happy summers we flew around Alaska in bush planes taking sediment samples out of remote lakes. It wasn't exactly arctic – never got more than a couple hundred miles north of the Alaska Range – but it was quite northern, enough to not get dark at night and find grizzly tracks through camp after a day on the lake. I liked it, but soon after there was a kid and a job and well you know how that goes. Shortly thereafter, it was 2011, I hadn't gotten into the middle of nowhere on a bike for four years, and it became clear that it was time to take a ride north of the Circle.

That meant Deadhorse or Inuvik. Deadhorse meant retracing a fair bit of ground I had covered in 1991, a highway that by most accounts is a bit nasty due to heavy truck traffic, busier than the Dempster, and a longer ride. Inuvik, on the other hand, involved crossing several mountain ranges on the lonely Dempster, experiencing some extraordinary geology, visiting the delta of the Mackenzie; frankly it seems a slightly better target. And at the end of the road, instead of Arco and BP, there are Eskimos and beluga whales. So it's the Dempster for me, not to mention of lot of other good stuff between home and that dusty turnoff east of Dawson.
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#YZF #NWT 'A landlord's market' Rental vacancies low as housing demand increases

#YZF #NWT 'A landlord's market' Rental vacancies low as housing demand increases | NWT News | Scoop.it
It didn't even matter that the three-bedroom home for rent was in an amazing location, on a quiet cul-de-sac close to schools, with a large yard, flower beds, a shed, a dog run at the side, and a sunny deck – high school math teacher Mike Johnston was sold at "for rent."

He called right away when he saw the posting last Thursday. He even attended an open house the vacationing home-owners scheduled that Friday to narrow down possible renters, and filled out application forms along with ten others interested. Due to the overwhelming response, the home's new renter was drawn out of a hat, and Johnston's name wasn't picke
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Canadian First Nations Under Surveillance

Canadian First Nations Under Surveillance | NWT News | Scoop.it
[excerpt]

Information obtained by Access to Information requests reveals that almost immediately upon taking power in 2006, the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) was given the lead role to spy on First Nations. The goal was to identify the First Nation leaders, participants and outside supporters of First Nation occupations and protests, and to closely monitor their actions.

To accomplish this task, INAC established a “Hot Spot Reporting System.” These weekly reports highlight all those communities across the country that engage in direct action to protect their lands and communities. They include Tobique First Nation, Tsartlip First Nation, the Algonquins of Barriere Lake, Teztan Biny (Fish Lake) First Nation, Six Nations, Grassy Narrows, Stz’uminous First Nation, the Likhts’amsiyu Clan of the Wet’suwet’en First Nation, Gitxaala First Nation, Wagmatcook First Nation, Innu of Labrador, Pikangikum First Nation, and many more. They include bands from the coast of Vancouver Island to the shores of the Atlantic Ocean.

What we see in these documents – from the hot spot reports themselves, to the intelligence-sharing between government and security forces – is a closely monitored population of First Nations, who clearly are causing a panic at the highest levels of Canadian bureaucracy and political office.
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DONATE: River Journey: The Berger Inquiry Revisited - Ft Simpson #NWT | SmallChangeFund.org

DONATE: River Journey: The Berger Inquiry Revisited - Ft Simpson #NWT | SmallChangeFund.org | NWT News | Scoop.it
A generation ago, our people stopped a gas pipeline on the Mackenzie River. Today, our children and grandchildren are faced with the same fight. Help us bring 6 people who changed our history 35 years ago on a journey down the river in a freighter canoe to connect youth with the inspiring and insistent action of their ancestors.
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History of water availability in the Rockies shows trouble ahead for Athabasca watershead

History of water availability in the Rockies shows trouble ahead for Athabasca watershead | NWT News | Scoop.it
[excerpt

A pair of recent papers shed some light on the long-term history of water availability in western North America, and find that modern trends in water availability and usage represent real challenges for the future.

[...]

The first paper, published in Geophysical Research Letters, provides a unique, 5,200-year record of water levels at Lake Athabasca in Canada, which is fed by rivers coming down from mountain catchments. Water usage in that region has increased 88 percent since 2000, in large part due to the booming oil sands industry, which now accounts for about 65 percent of water use. At the same time, streamflow feeding Lake Athabasca has decreased over the last few decades. Effective planning requires accurate predictions of future water availability.

In a sediment core from the bottom of a pond connected to Lake Athabasca, the researchers used the ratio of carbon to nitrogen as a proxy to infer lake level in the past. The ratio tracks changes in vegetation, which can shift from peat to open water plants. The advantage of this technique is that it can probe deeper into the past than records generated from tree rings (which go back about 1,000 years). A comparison with existing tree ring data verifies that this carbon/nitrogen technique does, in fact, accurately track lake level.

The deeper history of the record turns out to be pretty important. The researchers found that "modern society in western Canada developed during a rare interval of relatively abundant freshwater supply." We happen to be living in an especially wet period, a result of the extra accumulation at mountain glaciers during the 1700s (a period known as the Little Ice Age). At only one other point in the record (around 0-500 A.D.) was water this plentiful—the 2,500 years previous to that were much drier.
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Tales from the #YZF #NWT dump with Walt Humphries: The British are coming!

[excerpt] Back to today. I am always a little amazed at how the various levels of government can let things slip and deteriorate for years but the moment a royal visit is scheduled, they are in a mad dash and flurry of activity to spruce the place up. Gardens are being put in, dead trees removed and gravel is being spread to hide the rough spots.

All of a sudden, loads of gravel and dirt are being spread all over the city to make the place look better and a little more civilized. The Queen got pavement when she visited, the royal couple gets gravel. I guess you can determine the rank of the royalty by what gets spread around before their visit.

For the first time in living memory, the city had crews out sweeping sidewalks in residential areas. It's not like the royal couple will actually walk down the sidewalks, but heaven forbid they should see what the sidewalks are normally like when they are chauffeured by.

One can pretty well tell where the royal tour is going to go by the clean-up activity going on and I am sad to report the dump doesn't appear to be on the tour, yet.

I am sure it is just a little oversight on the city's part and the Royals will indeed request a dump tour.

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 Lucky Jack Press  #YZF #NWT

 Lucky Jack Press  #YZF #NWT | NWT News | Scoop.it
LuckyJack Press is currently looking for mail art pals. Be sure to check out my art inspired blog at http://www.thepapercoyote.blogspot.com If you are interested in swapping cool art with me after what you see, e-mail via the contact page.
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Where's Canada's best community? Try Fort Smith, #NWT

Where's Canada's best community? Try Fort Smith, #NWT | NWT News | Scoop.it
Where's Canada's best community?Try Fort Smith, NT...

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/time-to-lead/wheres-canadas-best-community-try-fort-smith-nt/article2065605/
From Globe Commenter MDevine
[Excerpt]
My nomination for Best Small Town in Canada is Fort Smith, Northwest Territories, pop. 2,500.

Smith, a historic portage point on the fur trade route to the Mackenzie, is located a few miles north of the Alberta border on the magnificent Slave River in the heart of the boreal forest. It's easy to hike into one of the four sets of rapids, and walk out on the rocks to stand amid the roaring waters. The town is the northern gateway to Wood Buffalo National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage site and it is the headquarters of the NWT's college system, so it has many recreational amenities including two libraries, museum, a book store, a music festival, a pool, and gyms, as well as first-class outdoor recreation.

The best part, though, is the people. The population is a mixture of First Nations, Metis, and non-Aboriginal people, many of whom have made the north their lifetime home.

Your View on Canada Day
Tell us: What's the best community in Canada?
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/time-to-lead/tell-us-whats-the-best-community-in-canada/article2051632/
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Avalon enters negotiations with Lutsel K'e Dene First Nation on Thor Lake #NWT

Avalon enters negotiations with Lutsel K'e Dene First Nation on Thor Lake #NWT | NWT News | Scoop.it
Rare metals-focused mining and exploration company, Avalon Rare Metals (TSE:AVL) (AMEX:AVL) announced Friday it has entered into negotiations with the Lutsel K'e Dene First Nations community regarding developments on the company's Thor Lake property.

The Lutsel K'e Dene First Nation resides 100 kilometres east of Thor Lake, in the Northwest Territories, which is within Lutsel K'e traditional territory. Avalon's discussions with the community are regarding the development of the Nechalacho rare earth elements deposit, which is known for its enrichment in the more valuable heavy rare earths, at the company's wholly owned Thor Lake site.

The negotiations will outline broad principles for co-operation, Avalon said, and will provide a structure for the Accommodation Agreement, which outlines the adverse impacts of project development and defines the benefits to both parties involved, among other things.

Avalon said it hopes to conclude the agreement by the end of the year.
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Northern_Clips' Circumpolar Blog: Yellowknife's Summer Solstice Festival Monday, June 20th 2011 #YZF #NWT

Northern_Clips' Circumpolar Blog: Yellowknife's Summer Solstice Festival Monday, June 20th 2011 #YZF #NWT | NWT News | Scoop.it
Summer Solstice Festival
>Monday, June 20th
>
>6:00 pm to 10:30 pm o Somba K'e Civic Plaza
>
>With music by:
>Tracey Riley & Special Guests
>The Gumboots o Blackspruce o Godson
>
>Your MC. Heidi Raulin
>
>- Story Telling
>- Traditional Crafts Area
>- Face painting with Snooker Doodles
>- Big Dee Children's Magic Show
>- and Riley Wilson - Magician Extraordinaire
>
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Headlines for Yellowknifer for June 17th 2011

Headlines for Yellowknifer for June 17th 2011 | NWT News | Scoop.it
* Fire training facility opens. Burn structure to improve training of firefighters, mine rescue teams
* GNWT should've called us, says SADD. Safe driving group upset they didn’t know about public hearing on rule changes
* City talks skate park relocation. Complaints from residents have council considering to allow bylaw officers to enforce park curfew
* Council ponders allowing staff to ride in back of trucks. City recommends councillors amend work bylaw
* NWT top judge calls it a career. John Vertes's still haunted by Giant Mine bombing case
OPINION
* Keep your eye on the eyesore. Streetscaping, not hyper-regulation is a better solution to what ails downtown
* The British are coming!
ENTERTAINMENT
* New exhibit features Yk artists. Collaboration showcases six different artistic styles
SPORTS
* Yk to the Hub by bicycle. More than 60 cyclists trek to Hay River in third annual YK2HR ride
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Western Premiers to Meet in NWT | Canada Views

Canadas Western Premiers will meet in the Northwest Territories (NWT) next week. NWT Premier Floyd K. Roland will host and chair the 2011 Western Premiers Conference with meetings scheduled in Yellowknife and Fort Simpson from June 20-22nd. ... While in the NWT, Premiers will also visit the spectacular Nahanni National Park and join residents of Yellowknife and Fort Simpson in local events and discussions marking National Aboriginal Day (June 21st) – a statutory holiday for residents of the Northwest Territories.
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Native Americans ask for greater sovereignty at congressional hearing – Cronkite News

Native Americans ask for greater sovereignty at congressional hearing – Cronkite News | NWT News | Scoop.it
[excerpt] WASHINGTON - For Arizona Native Americans Duane Yazzie and James Anaya, the need for the U.S. to stop marginalizing indigenous peoples and start listening has never been greater.

The men were among several who testified to Congress Thursday on the need to pass legislation that abides by the United Nations Declaration on Indigenous Peoples — passed in 2007 but only approved by the U.S. in December.

“Oftentimes, too many times, throughout our relationship, the federal government has decided it knows best what is proper for us,” said Yazzie, chairman for the Navajo Nation Human Rights Commission.

“We have always known what is best for us. We continue to know what is best for us,” said Yazzie, who said the “big-brother attitude” of the government has created gaps in U.S. policy.

The declaration recognizes the rights of native peoples to “self-determination, institutions, cultures and traditions,” while also barring discrimination against indigenous peoples. Only four countries – Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the U.S. – voted against the declaration in 2007 and the U.S. became the last nation to endorse it.

No opponents were present at Thursday’s oversight hearing of the Senate Indian Affairs Committee, which heard from nine speakers who urged the U.S. to embrace the declaration.
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Amber Oliver's curator insight, April 6, 2015 3:00 PM

Module 6- This article discusses sovereignty and the requests from Native Americans for Congress to listen to them regarding their numerous concerns. Good insight on how perhaps Native Americans are still viewed by the U.S. government?

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RT @Deneze: Here is some work I do....@CBCNorth video "Liard Highway #NWT in bad shape..."

RT @Deneze: Here is some work I do....@CBCNorth video "Liard Highway #NWT in bad shape..." | NWT News | Scoop.it
Highway that connects N.W.T. to B.C. is in rough shape, making people in Fort Liard, N.W.T., feel more isolated than usual.
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