Nurturing Giftedness
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Nurturing Giftedness
No Gifted Child Should Be Left Behind. That includes GT parents, too.
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Gifted Children’s Strengths Often Present Challenges

Gifted Children’s Strengths Often Present Challenges | Nurturing Giftedness | Scoop.it

"Imagine, if you can, that you are five years old, but you can think like a fourth grader. Where do you find your friends? The other five-year-olds are too immature, and the 10-year-olds don’t take you seriously. If the older kids want you around at all, it’s as a sort of mascot, not as a peer. Physically, you can’t do the things the fourth graders can: you can’t hit a ball very well; you have trouble riding a two-wheeler; you can’t run
as fast. No matter how hard you try, you’ll always be behind the physical and
emotional curve set by older classmates. It’s like being a person who speaks
only German and travels to Italy and France. You like being there, but because
the language and cultures are different, it’s hard to be understood and to get
what you need.


Fitting in with neither their average-ability age peers nor their older intellectual peers, gifted children all too often are teased, put down, and ridiculed by both other children and adults. It’s no wonder, then, that they sometimes feel out of place, weird, inept, and even angry, particularly because they are generally more intense and sensitive than other children. Their emotions, already exquisitely sensitive, often are
exposed, raw, and tender, and their lack of emotional maturity can make their
lives—and yours—a challenge at best and a nightmare at worst.


Gifted children have many wonderful, enjoyable qualities, but when those qualities are combined with emotional and social immaturity, the flip side of those same attributes can look a lot less appealing." - Excerpt from Helping Gifted Children Soar, 2nd
Edition by Carol Strip Whitney, Ph.D. and Gretchen Hirsch


Read more: http://www.greatpotentialpress.com/gifted-childrens-strengths-often-present-challenges

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Susan Volinski's curator insight, November 14, 2013 10:13 PM

     This is an excerpt from Carol Strip Whitney and Gretchen Hirsch’s book called “Helping Gifted Children Soar,” discussing emotional roller coaster parents and children must endure. It discusses how gifted children do not fit in with other children because their mentality is not on the same level as their peers. For example, a gifted fourth grader might have the mentality of a 6th grader, but the 6th graders do not want to hang out with him because he is too young, and the gifted student doesn’t hang out with his fourth grade peers because they are too immature. So what friends does a gifted student have other than other gifted students? It’s so sad when a child has a hard time making friends. It’s interesting to note that gifted children have behavioral issues because and may become isolated as they get older because this is not usually an aspect people think about when they think of gifted. The qualities that a gifted child has, such as creative thinking, adult-level thinking, and advanced language abilities can easily backfire on the child. Students may think that their gifted peer is just being stuck up, rude, strange, and overly talkative, which can lead to isolation from peers. This has great effects on the child’s esteem as they get older. If they continue to be isolated by their peers, they may develop depression and other mental problems. This ties in with the other article about how there is a high rate of gifted student dropouts because those students were too smart for the system and they weren’t stimulated enough. On a similar note, gifted students might also drop out because they are not socially accepted by their peers, and at a young age, from what I remember, feeling accepted is really important. Students who are gifted and talented should not be criticized for their abilities and should be accepted by all.  

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Many Ages at Once | Psychology Today

Many Ages at Once | Psychology Today | Nurturing Giftedness | Scoop.it

The science behind the asynchronous development of gifted children By Lisa Rivero...

"Giftedness is 'asynchronous development' in which advanced cognitive abilities and heightened intensity combine to create inner experiences and awareness that are qualitatively different from the norm. This asynchrony increases with higher intellectual capacity. The uniqueness of the gifted renders them particularly vulnerable and requires modifications in parenting, teaching, and counseling in order for them to develop optimally."

"Parents often describe these children as being many ages at once. A five year old, for example, might read third-grade books, lack the small motor coordination necessary for kindergarten art projects, have lengthy conversations with adults, and struggle to communicate effectively with age peers—all at the same time. Asynchronous development becomes less of an issue as children grow up, but the challenges can last well into adolescence."

Read more: http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/creative-synthesis/201201/many-ages-once

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Children whose minds wander 'have sharper brains' - Telegraph

Children whose minds wander 'have sharper brains' - Telegraph | Nurturing Giftedness | Scoop.it
Children whose minds wander might have sharper brains, research suggests.
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How to be a genius

How to be a genius | Nurturing Giftedness | Scoop.it

"Eric Kandel of Columbia University in New York, who won a Nobel prize in 2000 for discovering much of the neural basis of memory and learning, has shown that both the number and strength of the nerve connections associated with a memory or skill increase in proportion to how often and how emphatically the lesson is repeated.

So focused study and practice literally build the neural networks of expertise. Genetics may allow one person to build synapses faster than another, but either way the lesson must still be learned. Genius must be built.

 

Studies of elite performance also chime with another recurrent theme in modern neuroscience and genetics. These disciplines all but insist that the traditional distinction between nature and nurture is obsolete.

 

What we call talent or genius illustrates vividly what the past 25 years have taught us about gene expression - that our genetic potentials are activated and realised only through environment and experience. Natural buoyancy merely gets you off the bottom. You rise to the top by pumping yourself up."

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10 Social & Emotional Needs of the Gifted

10 Social & Emotional Needs of the Gifted | Nurturing Giftedness | Scoop.it

"While gifted students look perfect on paper, their teachers know that in the classroom they are not all the academic angels and stellar scholars that people assume they are. Successful teachers of the gifted require a special understanding of their students’ social and emotional needs"

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Identify gifted children to reduce reoffending, justice staff told | Children & Young People Now

Identify gifted children to reduce reoffending, justice staff told | Children & Young People Now | Nurturing Giftedness | Scoop.it

"What is particularly valuable about this report is that, in addition to being a wake-up call to all those involved with offender learning, it is also a wake-up call to government in general. How much better if the talents that currently go unrecognised amongst those in custody, were recognised early enough for their development to prevent offending?"

 

"The association is now calling on schools, local authorities and youth justice workers to consider whether a child is gifted when assessing learning difficulties.

 

It is also proposed that training to identify and support those with special educational needs, including those who have exceptional learning potential, should be provided to all those who work with young offenders, including police, court staff, lawyers, staff in detention facilities and youth offending teams.

 

Youth offending teams are also called upon to be aware of gifted young people when completing assessments under the Asset system."

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Sorry, Strivers: Talent Matters

Sorry, Strivers: Talent Matters | Nurturing Giftedness | Scoop.it

"Popular research says 10,000 hours of practice is the key to success. Not so fast."

 

"Exhibit A is a landmark study of intellectually precocious youths directed by the Vanderbilt University researchers David Lubinski and Camilla Benbow. They and their colleagues tracked the educational and occupational accomplishments of more than 2,000 people who as part of a youth talent search scored in the top 1 percent on the SAT by the age of 13. (Scores on the SAT correlate so highly with I.Q. that the psychologist Howard Gardner described it as a “thinly disguised” intelligence test.) The remarkable finding of their study is that, compared with the participants who were “only” in the 99.1 percentile for intellectual ability at age 12, those who were in the 99.9 percentile — the profoundly gifted — were between three and five times more likely to go on to earn a doctorate, secure a patent, publish an article in a scientific journal or publish a literary work. A high level of intellectual ability gives you an enormous real-world advantage."

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Here Are The 17 Radical Ideas From Google's Top Genius Conference That Could Change The World

Here Are The 17 Radical Ideas From Google's Top Genius Conference That Could Change The World | Nurturing Giftedness | Scoop.it
Here Are The 17 Radical Ideas From Google's Top Genius Conference That Could Change The World

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/here-are-the-17-radical-ideas-from-googles-top-genius-conference-that-could-change-the-world-2012-2#imaging-the-minds-eye-1#ixzz1mLE1Zk5q

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Black Youth Invents Surgical Technique - at 14

Black Youth Invents Surgical Technique - at 14 | Nurturing Giftedness | Scoop.it

"Education experts say youngsters as young as 10 can experience great achievement at an early age if their thirst for knowledge is encouraged and they are given opportunities to shadow professionals and get internships. Also, a rigorous study schedule that also builds in some recreation is key."

 

Truly kids have the potential to become what we dare believe that they can become! Follow their lead. Spark their interests. Ignite their passion. Nurture their "nature". Help them find their own "awesome-ness"! ~ Kids Ahoy!

 

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Growing Up Gifted Is Not Easy

Growing Up Gifted Is Not Easy | Nurturing Giftedness | Scoop.it

"Gifted people and geniuses are peculiar, fascinating, in possession of a valuable commodity. They’re almost celebrities. Certainly oddities."

"Keeping in mind the danger of burdening an ordinary, human child with an archetype, let’s talk about real children who happen to be gifted and what problems they face.

It’s lonely, for one thing, since most children of their own age find them strange, and the gifted child find his or her peers boring.

 

Of course there are always adults wanting to play chess with them, or listen to them play music, or converse with them and hear “such fresh insights” coming from a child able to think about adult concerns.

 

But adults are not peers and do not share the same culture. Plus it’s clear to these children that for most adults only one thing is interesting about them: Their gifts.

That they have ordinary teen age interests, fears, romances, and what not is disappointing to these adults.

 

It doesn’t fit with being a Divine Child. In fact, too often adults are shy around gifted children, not wanting to ask about these “ordinary” areas of their life, or assume having a high I.Q. means they have these matters worked out brilliantly.

 

If you are a parent of a gifted child, you will have to examine closely how much you are pushing your child in some areas, and doing enough about his or her development in social and emotional areas." 

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So you hate hearing about my “gifted” child…

So you hate hearing about my “gifted” child… | Nurturing Giftedness | Scoop.it

"Let’s be honest, you didn’t do anything wrong by talking about the totally average and normal things you child does. It’s who your kid is, right? It’s her normal, right? You aren’t one upping or trying to be superior or show off or make anyone feel bad. You are just sharing your day to day life, trying to connect with other parents. Well just know that your normal can make that other mom at the park feel like crap and feel like you are bragging. But it’s your NORMAL. It’s not bragging, it’s a matter of fact – it’s your experience of your child. Just as my one daughter’s giftedness is her NORMAL. Just as my other child’s special needs are her NORMAL.

If you talk about what your child did, it’s just talking. If a gifted parent does the same, it’s bragging. As a parent of a gifted child, I’ve found it’s a lonely road and a hard one, and god forbid we talk about it, because someone is sure to think we are bragging. Most of us go out of our way to not talk about it, I know I do. If I learn someone has a gifted child, I NEVER think “wow, they must be so proud”. My first thought is more along the lines of “I wonder how tired they are?”."

Above article and more like it circulating on the net is a response to this: http://blogs.babycenter.com/mom_stories/i-hate-hearing-about-your-gifted-child/

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Asperger's Syndrome and High-Functioning Autism | Hoagies' Gifted

Asperger's Syndrome and High-Functioning Autism | Hoagies' Gifted | Nurturing Giftedness | Scoop.it

"Asperger's Syndrome and High-Functioning Autism - how do these diagnoses interact with the identification of a gifted child?"

"Those of you who have been around me a lot have noticed that sometimes I act like I'm from another planet. I may flap my hands, or not look at you when I talk, or not understand your hints or body language. Things you think are nothing may really upset me, and things you can ignore may distract me from the job at hand. I have trouble following a long string of instructions, but I can get so involved in a book that I don't realize I'm in a room full of active, noisy people..." Martin, Fitting In and Speaking Out 

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TWICE EXCEPTIONAL: ONE CHILD, TWO SPECIAL NEEDS - Community Magazine

TWICE EXCEPTIONAL: ONE CHILD, TWO SPECIAL NEEDS - Community Magazine | Nurturing Giftedness | Scoop.it
Community MagazineTWICE EXCEPTIONAL: ONE CHILD, TWO SPECIAL NEEDSCommunity MagazineShockingly, the US Department of Education estimates that 2–5 percent of all students are both gifted intellectually and suffer from some form of learning disability.

 

"How do we avoid losing out on the Einsteins of our generation?"

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How Geniuses Think | The Creativity Post

How Geniuses Think | The Creativity Post | Nurturing Giftedness | Scoop.it

Thumbnail descriptions of the thinking strategies commonly used by creative geniuses.

"How do creative geniuses generate so many alternatives and conjectures? Why are so many of their ideas so rich and varied? How do they produce the "blind" variations that lead to the original and novel? A growing cadre of scholars are offering evidence that one can characterize the way geniuses think. By studying the notebooks, correspondence, conversations and ideas of the world's greatest thinkers, they have teased out particular common thinking strategies and styles of thought that enabled geniuses to generate a prodigious variety of novel and original ideas."

Read more: http://www.creativitypost.com/create/how_geniuses_think

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María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, August 28, 2014 6:45 AM

How Geniuses Think I The Creativity Post

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Gifted children - Social emotional challenges

Gifted children - Social emotional challenges | Nurturing Giftedness | Scoop.it

"It often seems that gifted children are more…emotional, physical, spiritual, etc. requiring more energy from parents.

 

Below are some common social/emotional struggles faced by gifted children:

 

- Gifted preschoolers have disproportional development between their motor skills and their conceptual abilities. They may want to copy something they have seen or create something they are imagining and yet their fine motor skills are not able to perform adequately to enable them meet that goal. Consequently, they become emotionally upset, and the volcano erupts.

 

- Perfectionism is an on-going problem with gifted individuals, including preschoolers that want their product to look like their picture or idea. Their unrealistic self expectations may insure that they will feel inadequate and discouraged.

 

- Their struggles may intensify when they become overly cautious, as they see all the possible dilemmas and difficulties with activities. They may avoid trying something new. Coping with a tendency to bind up when facing new challenges can become a life-long frustration in decision-making.

 

- In peer relationships, often the gifted children find that they are more comfortable with older children and not so much with those of their own chronological age.

Many gifted children experience what is called “hypersensitivity”. They may be overly sensitive to the emotions of others and may overreact to peer and family issues causing conflicts. They may also be extra sensitive to the environment including noise, light, or confusion, sometimes causing difficulty in social settings"

More: http://www.sixtysecondparent.com/parenting-tips/gifted-children-social-emotional-challenges

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Twice Exceptional Children Overlooked « Rochester SAGE ...

Twice Exceptional Children Overlooked « Rochester SAGE ... | Nurturing Giftedness | Scoop.it

"Are the school employees at fault? Most are simply not trained and instead apply the common stereotypical view of what they think gifted refers to. Many people believe that gifted children are well-dressed, bright eyed kids with their hands held high to answer the teacher’s questions. The kids who get the best grades must be gifted, right? Maybe some gifted children fit that description, but most do not. Gifted children are often bored in school and may choose to either become the class clown or become depressed by the lack of stimulation. They are often looked at as trouble makers or the kid who forgot to turn his homework in again. Identification of gifted children isn’t easy for trained professionals, let alone those without training."

http://rochestersage.org/2012/03/13/twice-exceptional-children-overlooked/

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Literacy, families and learning: Enrichment for Gifted & Talented Children

Literacy, families and learning: Enrichment for Gifted & Talented Children | Nurturing Giftedness | Scoop.it

"Life for the highly gifted child can be an extremely frustrating, confusing and at times lonely experience if their giftedness isn't identified and supported. If your child demonstrates, to a significantly greater extent, a large number of the following characteristics, they may be gifted and will need support, encouragement and some adaptation by teachers and parents:
• The ability to invent or create novel or original things, or look at their world in unusual ways.
• The desire and ability to investigate their immediate world, to see the unusual and observe things that others don't notice.
• Extreme curiosity demonstrated by experimentation, investigation and in depth study.
• Using extended vocabulary, complex sentence structure and varied language forms.
• Understanding and using imagery and metaphorical language at a young age (often under 5 years).
• Exploring varied interests often at depth, well beyond their years.
• Being able to learn rapidly and easily compared to other children.
• Gaining great pleasure and excitement when they are learning new and difficult things.
• Outstanding memory demonstrated by encyclopaedic recall.
• A desire to spend time with older children or adults and to learn with and from them.
• Being able to cope with the introduction of many new ideas, sometimes simultaneously.
• Wanting to spend large amounts of time learning about a favourite topic.
• Capable of generating many solutions to verbal or mathematical problems.
• Enjoying and seeking out frequent intellectual challenges.
• Demonstrating unusual imagination that is stimulated easily and sometimes independently.
• Ability to generate multiple ideas and solutions to problems.
• Showing preparedness to question assumed knowledge or ways of doing things.
• Often preferring individual work rather than group work and able to work well independently.
• Demonstrating a highly mature and unusual sense of humour.
• Sometimes having expectations of themselves that are too demanding and unrealistic.
• Demonstrating single-mindedness and extreme determination when pursuing interests."

Read more:http://trevorcairney.blogspot.com/2012/03/enrichment-for-gifted-talented-children.html

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Cultivating Genius in the 21st Century

Cultivating Genius in the 21st Century | Nurturing Giftedness | Scoop.it

"Most economic growth has a very simple source: new ideas. It is our creativity that generates wealth. So how can we increase the pace of innovation? Is it possible to inspire more Picassos and Steve Jobses?"

"Another recurring theme is the importance of education. All of these flourishing cultures pioneered new forms of teaching and learning. Medieval Florence saw the rise of the apprentice-master model, which let young artists learn from veteran experts. Elizabethan England made a concerted effort to educate its middle-class males, which is how William Shakespeare—the son of a glover who couldn’t sign his name—ended up getting free Latin lessons. We need to emulate these ingenious eras and encourage rampant experimentation in the education sector, whether it’s taking the Khan Academy mainstream or expanding vocational training. As T. S. Eliot once remarked, the great ages did not contain more talent. They wasted less."

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Daughters of Tomorrow: The curse of giftedness

Daughters of Tomorrow: The curse of giftedness | Nurturing Giftedness | Scoop.it

"I find giftedness is a curse..and if you think your child is gifted, the least you can do is to get them tested..so you can help them..Knowing you are gifted doesn't make your child arrogant or give them an attitude..it helps them to understand why they do things the way they do..it liberates them..gives them hope..and helps them cope!"

"Wouldn't it be nice, if children are given a chance to grow...rather than be cut and pruned to be what the parents want them to be?"

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Taylor Steinfeldt's curator insight, July 22, 2016 3:20 PM
The author of this article claims that giftedness is a curse.  Do you agree or disagree?  She stressed the importance of just letting your children grow and not trying to create a "super child" by putting headphones on a pregnant belly and eating super foods to make your children smart.  I am a big believer in simply reading to your children.  I think this is the best way to teach your children to read and write.  This is what the author did with her children and they are fluent in many languages.  I found this article very interesting.  What are your thoughts?
Maggie Milani's comment, July 23, 2016 2:01 PM
The author of this article has a very unique standpoint. I would have never thought of giftedness as a curse but I can definitely see where she is coming from and her concerns for her children. This article just reinforces the fact that all gifted students have their own interests and are good at different things. I understand the author's point about giftedness being a curse, where students are bored in the regular classroom and can be picked on by teachers and other students for being different. Just because a student may not excel in one subject does not mean that they are not gifted. I also agree that reading to your children from a young age will help them in the future but it also has to do with the child's motivation and desire to learn. This article also shows the disservice we give to our gifted students and it is disheartening.
Courtnee DeMuth's comment, August 6, 2016 6:53 PM
This was a really interesting article to read, as I hadn't really thought of giftedness as curse. Although I do understand where the author is coming from in that giftedness could be a curse if the student becomes less motivated to achieve and doesn't want to participate in classroom activities. I think giftedness is a very unique concept but that by doing extreme things with your children when they are young just to get them into gifted education programs may not always be the best. I agree with Maggie that reading to your children at a young age and continuing to do so is important and will help them in the future but that also depends a lot upon the motivation and desire to learn that your child may or may not inherently have.
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7 steps to raise a geek child - GeekWire

7 steps to raise a geek child - GeekWire | Nurturing Giftedness | Scoop.it

"Let your child fail. Expose your child to fine art. Expose your child to Star Trek (or if you must, Star Wars). Let them see you reading for pleasure. Encourage them to tiner, hack and obsessively explore. Volunteer in elementary school. Promote face time."

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From Perfection to Personal Bests: 7 Ways to Nurture Your Gifted Child

From Perfection to Personal Bests: 7 Ways to Nurture Your Gifted Child | Nurturing Giftedness | Scoop.it



"What is a "growth mindset?" First, let me explain the "fixed mindset," as defined by cognitive psychologist Carol Dweck. Gifted children, lauded for years by relatives, friends and teachers about their natural intelligence and innate abilities, often develop the belief that everything they do should come out well and that their smarts alone are enough to guarantee that things will come easy. In the mid-to-late elementary school years, when class work and extracurricular tasks begin to require effort and genuine persistence, many gifted children first start to doubt their intelligence. Their fixed mindset dictates that if they are not the best, don't score a perfect 100 percent, or can't find a solution easily and immediately, then they must be stupid, bad and worthless. All-or-nothing thinking, as it turns out, is a hallmark of some of the greatest young thinkers out there. It can also be a deal-breaker to their otherwise unlimited potential.

 

How can parents and teachers counter the fixed mindset and replace it with a growth one? 

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Adora Svitak: What adults can learn from kids

"Child prodigy Adora Svitak says the world needs "childish" thinking: bold ideas, wild creativity and especially optimism. Kids' big dreams deserve high expectations, she says, starting with grownups' willingness to learn from children as much as to teach."

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You stuck up "gifted" people!

You stuck up "gifted" people! | Nurturing Giftedness | Scoop.it

"I have come to realize that some people just hate the term "gifted." They hate it. It makes them angry. I'm not sure why, and they likely don't know why, either. For whatever reason, though, it conjures up bitterness in their hearts and they say nasty things about people who believe their children are above average."

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Two Sides Of The Curve, And A Lot In Common.

Two Sides Of The Curve, And A Lot In Common. | Nurturing Giftedness | Scoop.it

"What is so very interesting to me, is how differently people perceive and react to children (and their parents) that fall on opposite sides of the bell curve. ... Asking me how much work/time/money it took to get her to be gifted."

"Now let’s talk about the child who is on the other side of the bell curve. That info is not something I tend to volunteer. But from my experience, and that of others who are walking the same path, the responses are along the lines of…

-Eye rolling and acting annoyed.
-Responding with “well all children are gifted”.
-Responding that “no child is gifted”.
-Responding that “everyone thinks their child is gifted”.
-Telling me how proud I must be of her.
-Asking me how much work/time/money it took to get her to be gifted. (I’ll roll my eyes now…)
-Telling me how lucky I am and how easy I have it (HA!)
-Changing the subject.
-Justifying why their child is not gifted.
-Telling me I’m too hard on her.

-Telling me I’m too easy on her.

-Telling me I should medicate her.

-Say she’s spoiled or being difficult for being a picky eater and having sensory issues.

-Treating her like she’s being a brat or a problem when she in fact actually knows what she’s talking about and has a very valid point and a reason for it to be heard.

-Providing disapproving stares and comments when she acts out in public.

-They recognize that she’s different, but do not accept or understand it, nor do they attempt to."

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I hate hearing about your gifted child

I hate hearing about your gifted child | Nurturing Giftedness | Scoop.it

"I’m having a lot of conflicting emotions when moms I know talk about their gifted kids. Why is it seemingly okay to brag about how smart your kids are?"

"But why am I comparing? Why do I care? Normal is a good thing! Normal is great! Normal is what I prayed for. But that’s a lie. I didn’t. I prayed for better than normal. I wanted the Amazing Super Child who was going to prove to the world how 5-star my DNA is (believe me, typing that out, I realize how stupid that sounds).

Maybe that’s why I feel like crap when a mom I know brags about the advanced-aheadedness of her kid. Do the braggers even notice that I fall silent and get downcast, listening? I try not to let it show. I know the moms are just excited and proud, and maybe I’d feel the same way if I had a lot of stuff to brag about." 

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