NSW K-6 Board of Studies Syllabus HSIE Early Stage 1: Cultures
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NSW K-6 Board of Studies Syllabus HSIE Early Stage 1: Cultures
This scoop-it topic aims to provide quality online digital resources to assist future and current educators when teaching the subject matter: 'characteristics, abilties and desires of students', under the Culture Strand in an Early Stage 1 classroom. Resources that encompass an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and a global perspective are included in the scoop-it topic.. The following digital sources aim to assist teachers in devising creative, engaging and informative lesson plans and activities that effectively teach the selected subject matter.
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Kids Book Review: Teachers' Notes & Lesson Plans

Kids Book Review: Teachers' Notes & Lesson Plans | NSW K-6 Board of Studies Syllabus HSIE Early Stage 1: Cultures | Scoop.it

Online website that provides notes and lesson plans for teachers on a variety of quality literature. Scroll down to find The Playground by Nadia Wheatley to discover a series of notes and lesson activities comprised by Wheatley herself. An excellent example to celebrate and respect the Indigenous Australian culture and community. 

Kate Hooper's insight:

Many resources with an Aboriginal perspective can be described as negative as they cast Aboriginal people as distant, ‘stereotypical, romantic primitives’ (Cavanagh, 2005, p.289). As a result, locating a quality resource based on the subject matter, 'characteristics, desires and abilities of students', that encourage celebration and respect of the contemporary and the modern Indigenous Australian culture proved to be a challenge. Cavanagh (2005) stated that many resources that embody an Aboriginal perspective encourage ‘indifference and hostility’ (p.297), in other words creating an ‘Us vs. Them’ image. As a result, I aimed to locate online resources relating to, The Playground compiled by Nadia Wheatley, which successfully avoids these negative connotations. This book is packed with historical and contemporary photographs, illustrations, stories and memoirs that effectively engage students with the diversity and prominent values that encompasses the Aboriginal culture. In addition the resource encourages students to develop a ‘sympathetic and realist understanding of the relationship between contemporary Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians’ (Cavanagh, p.298, p.15). 

 

It is important to note that this text, in conjunction with the online resource has been selected using the criteria for the Evaluation of Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islander Studies in response to authenticity, balanced nature, Aboriginal and/or Torres Straight Islander participation and accuracy and support. This online resource founded on the website Kids Book Reviews provides teachers notes and lesson ideas revolving around the book which are assembled by Wheatley herself (Note: scroll down to click Playground to open the PDF resource file). 

 

The lesson activity ‘CIRCLE STORIES: mapping country, history and identity’ (p.5), assists students in understanding their own cultural identity and their place in a community. The range of activities encourages students to display information about their own culture on a map scaffold. Quality links to all other KLA’s are suggested in this lesson plan, including literacy and numeracy links, however would need to be slightly adapted to meet Early Stage 1 students due to the advanced level of the tasks. It is vital for teachers to use observation in order to assess the students progress as they work their way through the activities. The resource successfully uses the culturally sensitive text to assist students in understanding the Indigenous Australian culture and identity in conjunction with their own. 

 

Cavanagh, P. (2011) Discovering shared history: Moving towards new understanding in Australian schools. In R.Craven (Ed.), Teaching Aboriginal Studies (pp.110-131). Crows Nest: Allen & Unwin.

 

Cavanagh, P. (2005). Silences, secrets and little white lies: reflections on therepresentation of Aboriginal people in Australian schools. In G. Cant, A. Goodall and J. Inns. (Eds.), Discourses and Silences: Indigenous Peoples, Risks and Resistance. (pp289-308) Christchurch, NZ: University of Canterbury. 

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World Vision Australia: A Day in the Life of Lucy

World Vision Australia: A Day in the Life of Lucy | NSW K-6 Board of Studies Syllabus HSIE Early Stage 1: Cultures | Scoop.it

World Vision Australia presents a video clip about Lucy, a young girl who lives in rural Uganda. In a typical day, Lucy helps her family by collecting water and firewood, helping to cook the family meal, feed the younger children, and playing with her siblings. Source provides ideas and lesson notes for teachers. 

 

Kate Hooper's insight:

World Vision Australia, a rectified and renowned website, provides an in-depth variety of resources for teachers to use in classrooms of all ages. This particular link looks at a Day in the Life of Lucy, a young girl who lives in Uganda. The film clip is engaging yet informative and is sensitive to appeal to students in the later stages of Kindergarten.

 

Teachers can use this video clip to inform students of contrasting and corresponding desires of children around the world, thus implementing a global perpsective. Before showing the clip, the teacher should work with the students to develop a list of practical personal desires. Students will then watch the clip and as a follow-up activity will develop a list of what they believe Lucy’s desires would be, for example, access to clean water and food. Students will then be provided with a venn diagram scaffold where they are to display similar and different desires to Lucy. This activity introduces students to the notion of 'needs and wants' and teachers may want to explore this concept further in a follow-up lesson. 

 

If students are at a high level of ability, teachers can encourage students to present their venn diagram to the rest of the class, discussing their own personal desires and how they compare to Lucy's. It is vital that teachers prompt the students during this breif presentation. This provides a link to literacy as students are 'presenting meaning through the construction of spoken texts' (Winch, 2010, p.51) which is highly important for Early Stage 1 students when learning to read and write (Winch, 2010, p.54). Winch states that observation is pivotal in adapting, modifying and/or extending classroom activities (Winch, 2010, p.670). As a result, teachers can use observation as an assessment strategy to determine how well the students have understood the task.

 

Winch, G. Johnson, R. March, P. et al. (2010).  Literacy: reading, writing and children’s literature (4th Ed). South Melbourne, Vic, Oxford University Press.

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'All About Me' to Introduce Characteristics, Desires and Abilities of Students

'All About Me' to Introduce Characteristics, Desires and Abilities of Students | NSW K-6 Board of Studies Syllabus HSIE Early Stage 1: Cultures | Scoop.it

This Pinterest site offers a variety of creative activities to assist teachers and students to 'get to know' one another in an Early Stage 1 classroom setting. 

Kate Hooper's insight:

This resource sourced from Pinterest, an online social networking site that allows individuals to pin images, videos and other objects, can be used to develop ideas of activities in an Early Stage 1 HSIE classroom. Teachers can use this resource as a guide to an introductory unit of work tilted ‘All About Me’. This UOW can be implemented when introducing the outcome of culture to Kindergarten students to help them discover and learn about characteristics, desires and abilities of themselves and their peers. The resource provides a rich variety of creative and innovative ideas of how to ‘get to know’ your students from prospective teachers worldwide. For example, some images display posters and charts that require students to describe their physical characteristics and background information about their families in engaging activities.

 

Students are able to compare and contrast characteristics of themselves and their families to lightly cover the concept of multiculturalism. It is essential that teachers encourage ‘positive classroom relationships in which students respect themselves and others…’(Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p.296), aiming to eliminate any racism and/or stereotyping to promote celebration and respect of diversity. In addition, to be an effective and valued teacher it is vital to recognize ‘students unique interests, experiences and abilities, needs and backgrounds’ (Marsh, 2010, p.252), which is what this unit of work successfully accomplishes. When teachers know students strengths, needs and interests, it enables them to develop relevant and authentic student connections to learning' (Capacity Building Series, 2011, p.2).

 

Teachers are able to link this unit of work with literacy by asking the students to practice their writing skills when completing certain task worksheets. Here, Kindergarten students are engaging in the task at hand, whilst further enhancing their ability to write simple sentences. Teachers can assess the completed tasks in regards to students scope and sequence of handwriting skills (Winch, 2010, p.359) and the overall understanding and quality of the completed work. 

 

Capacity Building Series (2011) Student Identity and Engagement in Elementary Schools, (Secretarait Special Edition, Issue 20). 

The Literacy and Numeracy Secretariat Retrieved April 22 2013 from http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/literacynumeracy/inspire/research/CBS_StudentIdentity.pdf ;

  

Gilbert, R & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment (4th ed.). Melbourne, Australia: Cengage Learning Australia. 

 

Winch, G. Johnson, R. March, P. et al. (2010).  Literacy: reading, writing and children’s literature (4th Ed). South Melbourne, Vic, Oxford University Press. 

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ePals Global Community

ePals Global Community | NSW K-6 Board of Studies Syllabus HSIE Early Stage 1: Cultures | Scoop.it
ePals is the social network optimized for K-12 learning. Over half a million classrooms in 200 countries and territories have joined the ePals Global Community to connect, collaborate and exchange ideas.

Via Catherine Smyth
Kate Hooper's insight:

This online social networking resource invites schools and students to connect with people of differing cultures and religions around the world. Teachers can use this resource when introducing the subject matter to remind the students of the similarities and differences in children’s abilities, characteristics and desires that exist not only in Australia, but worldwide. Having class ePals will encourage students to develop a rich and thorough understanding about various cultures, thus strengthening respect and praise for difference. Furthermore, it allows students to develop genuine relationships with students from varying cultures. Teachers have the opportunity to access and utilize this resource, as it is simple, straightforward and free of charge.

  

With guidance from a teacher, students can write draft letters, a link to literacy, to their ePals discussing their identity and comparing, ‘with sensitivity and empathy, similarities and differences between themselves and others’ (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p.297). Teachers are able to assess their students understanding of this concept by observing what information about themselves they would relay and what questions they would like to ask their ePal. To conclude this lesson activity, students can holistically write and send a class letter to an ePal of their choice. The letter can include some extracts from the students draft letters outlining their own characteristics and desires, some interesting facts about the class and some relevant questions. Hopefully, the relationships founded via this online social networking resource will strengthen and thus can be utilized in other ways throughout the school year. 

 

It would be most beneficial for teachers to implement this resource and accompanying activities into an Early Stage 1 classroom, only when students understand and respect cultural diversity in a ‘secure and supportive environment’ (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p.296). In other words, this resource would be most effective to students at the conclusion of the unit of work as students will have vital prior knowledge and understanding.

 

Gilbert, R & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment (4th ed.). Melbourne, Australia: Cengage Learning Australia. 

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Bio Cube: ReadWriteThink

Bio Cube: ReadWriteThink | NSW K-6 Board of Studies Syllabus HSIE Early Stage 1: Cultures | Scoop.it

Bio Cube is a useful online summarizing tool that helps students identify and list key elements about a person. Teachers can use these cubes to assist students in recognising and appreciating the differences in characteristics, abiities and desires within the classroom. 

Kate Hooper's insight:

This online interactive resource sourced from ReadWriteThink, provides scaffolds for students to develop and build their own ‘Bio Cube’. Teachers can use this resource for an activity within the ‘All About Me’ unit of work for students to display personal information, by drawing, physical characteristics, experiences and interests. Below are some examples of information that can feature on student’s bio cubes:

-       name and date of birth

-       photograph of themselves and family

-       hair colour, eye colour, height

-       place of birth

-       favourite foods, hobbies, books, movies etc

 

Displaying the cubes in a creative way around the classroom, such as hanging them on a piece of string from the ceiling, will encourage students and parents to observe and learn about each child’s biography. Marsh (2010) supports this notion by stating that students should have the opportunity to express their personalities, which can even have an impact on the attitudes and achievements of students (p.315).

 

Teachers can use a form of informal assessment in a ‘natural situation’ (Marsh, 2010, p.315) to assess the development and understanding of the subject matter. The informal assessment can include observations of the completed work along with the behaviour of students throughout the duration of the task. 

 

In addition, teachers can use this lesson as a link to numeracy through the use of graphs. The class can develop a list of physical characteristics of each student, for example hair and eye colour and present this data in graphs or charts. This mathematical link allows students to work with numbers when comparing and contrasting physical appearances of students. Furthermore, students are able to understand how graphs can be used to ‘collect and organise data’ (Bobis et al, 2009, 72).

 

Bobis. J, Mulligan. J & Lowrie. T (2009) Mathematics for Children: Challenging children to think mathematically. Pearson Education Australia, Frenches Forest, NSW, Australia

 

Marsh. C (2010) Becoming a Teacher Knowledge, Skills and Issues (5th Edition) Pearson Australia Frenchs Forest NSW.

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