Nova Scotia Art
6.0K views | +4 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Larry Matthews
onto Nova Scotia Art
Scoop.it!

Maritime Camera Club - Winter Birds of Nova Scotia

Through October 2015 and February 2016, members of the Maritime Camera Club were challenged to photography winter birds of Nova Scotia. We had a couple of ra...
more...
No comment yet.
Nova Scotia Art
Nova Scotia Art and Artists
Curated by Larry Matthews
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Larry Matthews
Scoop.it!

Nova Scotia Real Estate 3 Buying Real Estate - YouTube

More information about buying a home. - Captured Live on Ustream at http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nova-scotia-real-estate
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Larry Matthews
Scoop.it!

1452 Barss Corner Road, Barss Corner

1452 Barss Corner Road, Barss Corner | Nova Scotia Art | Scoop.it

Over 44 Acres for the horse family or family with ATV's. Pride of ownership throughout this property and home. 2700 sq. ft. of living space. This split level offers 3 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms on the main level. Living and dinning room with the kitchen and all appliances. The lower level has a 4th bedroom with full bathroom. Laundry and family room with walkout. Access to built in garage from lower level. This home is the whole package. PLUS there is a 2 storey barn for all your toys or animals. Put this one on your must see list. you will not be disappointed.

Call Doug Glasser to view 902-880-2891 or drglasser.homes@gmail.com

Larry Matthews's insight:

1452 Barss Corner Road, Barss Corner

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Larry Matthews
Scoop.it!

Teichert Gallery: is Atlantic Canada’s premier art sales and rental gallery

Teichert Gallery: is Atlantic Canada’s premier art sales and rental gallery | Nova Scotia Art | Scoop.it
Teichert Gallery is Atlantic Canada’s premier art sales and rental gallery, located in Halifax, Nova Scotia.
Larry Matthews's insight:

Teichert Gallery: is Atlantic Canada’s premier art sales and rental gallery

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Larry Matthews
Scoop.it!

2793 Highway 2 Shubenacadie

2793 Highway 2 Shubenacadie | Nova Scotia Art | Scoop.it

This professional building is anchored by East Hants Health Services offering 7900 sq ft of finished space. First and second floor have his and her two piece baths and the top floor is open with one 2 pce bath. Huge building with 3 finished floors. Looking for an investment or office space for your business? This could be for you. Centrally located to service both Halifax and Truro markets. Looking to expand and need more room? Call today!

Call Larry Matthews to view 902-483-0754 larry@easthants.com 

Larry Matthews's insight:

2793 Highway 2 Shubenacadie

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Larry Matthews
Scoop.it!

8482 Hwy 354 Noel

8482 Hwy 354 Noel | Nova Scotia Art | Scoop.it

Unlimited potential with this fantastic lakefront property.

Purchase price includes....

  • Spacious modern bungalow with attached garage and breezeway
 
  •    Acres of lakefront land with roads installed for camping or cottages
  • Man made ponds suitable for fish farming or Ufish opportunity.
  • 5 pads with under ground water lines installed ready to build cottages.
  • Ideal central Nova Scotia location 60 miles from Halifax, 30 miles from Truro.
  • Near major tourist attractions including tidal bore rafting, world's highest tides at Burntcoat Head, WD Lawrence house museum located in Maitland where the World's largest wooden schooner was constructed.
 
  • Additional 70 acre lakefront parcel available with road installed to the lake.(On the other side of the lake not included in price) Also detached garage or shop with concrete floor , insulated and heated with overhead doors and high ceilings. Main floor storage area, office and 2 piece bath all on it's own lot. Available not included in asking price.
All this just 45 minutes from the Halifax international airport via paved highway.

Call Larry to view 902-483-0754 or Email Larry

Larry Matthews's insight:

8482 Hwy 354 Noel

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Larry Matthews
Scoop.it!

81 MacPhee Road, Shubenacadie

81 MacPhee Road, Shubenacadie | Nova Scotia Art | Scoop.it

Exceptional is the only word to describe this unique and once in a lifetime ideal country property. With over 1900 sq ft on the main level and designed for today's lifestyle with ensuite & office off master bedroom. This property has so many benefits and so much potential. Panoramic views, quiet country road, 36x58 detached garage with 14' ceilings, finished and insulated. Lovely landscaping with manicured lawns on 10 +/- acres..

Call Larry Matthews to view 902-483-0754 or larry@easthants.com

Larry Matthews's insight:

81 MacPhee Road, Shubenacadie

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Larry Matthews
Scoop.it!

Funding grant could be 'huge' for Halifax's smallest museums | CBC News

Funding grant could be 'huge' for Halifax's smallest museums | CBC News | Nova Scotia Art | Scoop.it
More than a dozen of the Halifax Regional Municipality's community museums could soon get a financial boost if city council votes on a new temporary grant program.
Larry Matthews's insight:

Funding grant could be 'huge' for Halifax's smallest museums | CBC News

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Larry Matthews
Scoop.it!

Canada’s War Art | Dispatches | Learn | Canadian War Museum

Canada’s War Art | Dispatches | Learn | Canadian War Museum | Nova Scotia Art | Scoop.it
CANADA'S WAR ART DISPATCHES: BACKGROUNDERS IN CANADIAN MILITARY HISTORY Dr. Laura Brandon Age is taking an inevitable but heavy toll on the generation of Canadians who remember the two world wars. As it does, the Canadian War Museum’s war art collections of 13,000 works increasingly provide a link to the conflicts from the perspective of those who witnessed them. While, to a certain extent, the paintings act as illustration, they also convey the feelings of the participants in the conflicts. This, perhaps, is their most important legacy. There are three collections: the Canadian War Memorials of the First World War (1914-18); the Canadian War Records of the Second World War (1939-45); and the post-war Canadian Armed Forces Civilian Artist Program (1968-95). The Canadian War Memorials, the First World War art collection, consists of nearly 1,000 works by over 100 artists, more than a third of them Canadian. In part because of its wide variety, the collection is of international stature. Not only does it powerfully capture Canada’s part in this tragic ‘war to end all wars’, but it has also proven a major influence in the development of Canadian art. Much of the familiar landscape art of Canada’s celebrated Group of Seven, for example, owes its genesis to sights seen and recorded in the mud and trenches of the Western Front in France and Belgium. The collection was the brainchild of Sir Max Aitken, later Lord Beaverbrook. Born in Canada in 1879, he made a fortune as a businessman in the country’s early years of expansion. After moving to Britain, he became financially involved in 1911 with the Daily Express, buying this newspaper outright five years later and using it as a vehicle for his ideas and to extend his influence. By this time the First World War had been ongoing for two years. While its losses had been heavy, the Canadian Corps had developed into a competent, professional force. Always a Canadian at heart, Beaverbrook’s genuine nationalist fervour contributed to his decision in 1916 to initiate and take personal responsibility for a project to record the war from Canada’s point of view. The result was the creation of the Canadian War Records Office. Aitken’s media interests made him ideally suited to the task of documenting the war in film, photograph, and print. His experience with a mass circulation daily paper meant he also knew what engaged people’s interests. A single event, the horrific German gas attack on the Canadians during the Second Battle of Ypres in April and May 1915, convinced him that the war should also be documented by art. The event was not photographed. So, in November 1916, Aitken’s new organization, the Canadian War Memorials Fund, a spin-off from the Canadian War Records Office, commissioned a huge 3.7 x 6-metre painting from British society artist Richard Jack. The success of this venture, combined with the prevailing belief at that time that the life-span of photographs was no more than twenty-five years, contributed to Aitken’s decision to commission more artists to record Canada’s war. He and his art advisor, Paul Konody, art critic at the Observer newspaper, thought in terms of major commissions. However, they were also responsive to the idea that artists should spend time on the battlefield making sketches that would be of archival value, and which in time might be turned into larger works. While supportive of Beaverbrook’s initiative, Sir Edmund Walker, Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the National Gallery of Canada, and Eric Brown, the institution’s director, sought to ensure that the war art program truly reflected Canada’s role in the conflict. They worried that the program recommended too many commissions for British artists. Walker corresponded with Beaverbrook concerning the employment of Canadian artists, an exchange that resulted in the establishment of the Canadian War Artists Advisory Committee. In 1917, Beaverbrook hired the future Group of Seven painter, A.Y. Jackson, then a soldier recovering from wounds he had received in June 1916. Jackson’s seemingly cavalier reaction to the front after his return there as a war artist belies the tragic content of many of his painting: “same old war…same old soldiers sticking it out, fed up but cheerful and doing impossible things, same old mud and shell holes.” In 1918, Walker was instrumental in ensuring official commissions for four more Canadians. One of them, Frederick Varley, another future member of the Group of Seven, was attached to the Canadian Corps in August 1918, when it began its advance from Amiens, France to Mons, Belgium during the Canadian-led offensives, known as ‘The Hundred Days’, which ended the war. By then, 60,000 Canadians had been killed of the over 620,000 enlisted. Varley memorialized what he saw in some of the bleakest, most moving, and starkly vivid works to come out of the war on any side. Walker and Brown of the Canadian War Artists Advisory Committee also included two other aspects of the conflict in the artistic record of the war: women and the home front. Arthur Lismer, a future Group of Seven painter, created memorable images of Halifax, Nova Scotia in wartime, while another future member, Frank Johnston, worked for several months documenting pilot training at various bases in Ontario. For the most part, women artists used women wartime workers as subjects. Women’s work itself was transformed, as thousands undertook tasks previously performed only by men. As the war drew to a close, Walker’s influence led to planning for a special building in Ottawa to house the art. Simultaneously, Beaverbrook announced the existence of his own commissioned designs for a monumental war memorial art gallery, also to be constructed in the nation’s capital. A decade of lobbying by protagonists of both schemes produced neither building. Instead, Beaverbrook lost interest in the project, feeling generally that his wartime work for Canada had been under-appreciated. By default, the National Gallery was left with custody of the artwork that he had commissioned during the war. The Second World War produced an entirely different Canadian art program. There are no huge memorial compositions focussing on destruction, tragedy, and misery. Instead, the somewhat depersonalized emphasis of most of its over 5,000 small paintings is on the locations, events, machinery, and personnel of Canada’s war on all fronts. Like the First World War art scheme, however, the Second World War plan depended on the energies of a committed few. The most important player was Canada’s High Commissioner to Great Britain, Vincent Massey. This time, Britain had instituted a war art program very early on, and when London’s National Gallery exhibited some of its first works in December 1939, Massey suggested Canada should institute its own project. The Department of National Defence’s response was initially one of indifference. Meanwhile, H.O. McCurry, Eric Brown’s successor as director of the National Gallery of Canada, began his own lobbying effort. Despite Massey’s and McCurry’s initial lack of success in establishing a full-fledged program, they did make progress, and Canadians were soon producing war paintings. A number of artists had enlisted in the armed forces and, inspired by their knowledge of the First World War program, contacted McCurry to suggest they would be more useful as artists in uniform. McCurry in turn passed their offers to National Defence Headquarters. There, Colonel A.F. Duguid, director of the historical section of the general staff, proceeded to employ Private E.J. Hughes and Sapper O.N. Fisher to depict activities in the army. In England, Massey arranged for Trooper W. A. Ogilvie to be attached to Canadian military headquarters as an artist. With the appointment in late 1940 of Major C.P. Stacey as the Canadian Army’s historical officer in London, Massey and McCurry acquired an important ally. One of Stacey’s first tasks was to coordinate the work of the notable English artist, Henry Lamb, who, as part of the British art program, had undertaken an assignment in 1941 to paint the Canadian army in England. Convinced that this sort of endeavour was of certain historical value, Stacey, in early 1942, was instrumental in formalizing the employment of Hughes, Fisher, and Ogilvie, and later Lawren P. Harris as war artists, and in obtaining for them the rank of second lieutenant. Despite these initiatives, not to mention the support of the Canadian art establishment as a whole, the first three years of the war were only minimally recorded. Late in 1942, the indefatigable Massey again tried to organize an official war art program. His request made it through the bureaucracy to the desk of Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King, who finally approved it. It was formally set up in January 1943, and a committee consisting of H.O. McCurry and senior military personnel from the three services ran the program from Canada. In Britain, Massey was the guiding light; officers in the services handled the mechanics of the program. Stacey, for example, continued to run the army’s official art program. It was a huge endeavour, the records of which contain hundreds of letters from service personnel, units, and newspapers requesting work or information, hundreds of notes written by staff officers regarding the movements of war artists, and file after file of war art listings, photographic records, and requests for loans. The thirty-one officers ultimately hired as official war artists were given rank, pay, supplies, and instructions. They were divided almost evenly among the three services, and served in all the western theatres of war including Britain, Italy, Northwest Europe, and the Atlantic Ocean. The army was quick off the mark, initially having the largest number of artists in the field, followed by the air force. The navy program was the last one to be put in place. The only woman artist, twenty-three year old Molly Lamb, formerly a private in the Canadian Women’s Army Corps, was not allowed overseas until after the war in Europe had ended in May 1945. The program initially neglected the home front and, in particular, the women’s military services, which by war’s end had recruited nearly 46,000 personnel. McCurry recognized this, but not until 1944 did he hire artists like Pegi Nicol MacLeod to paint the women’s services in Ottawa. The program of work the artists followed differed very little from hat of their First World War predecessors. Moreover, the artists’ official instructions issued by the committee managing the program were tightly focussed, leaving little room for interpretation. They specified the size and quantity of their paintings as well as their subjects. For the most part, the artists were not well prepared for this new subject matter; the landscape tradition, in which they had largely been trained, had equipped them poorly for the reality of war. Accuracy was paramount, and the degree to which the artists saw this as important can be seen in their thousands of detailed small sketches of equipment, vehicles, and uniforms. Their finished oil compositions, however, reveal how well they adapted their skills to the requirements of war. In them, creativity and record are combined in images that are sensitive to both history and art. Those of official army artist O.N. Fisher were unusually innovative. In preparation for the D-Day invasion on 6 June 1944, he strapped tiny waterproof pads of paper to his wrist. After racing up the beach from his landing craft, Fisher made rapid, on-the-spot sketches, using perfectly dry materials, of the battle unfolding around him. Later, the artist created larger watercolour paintings away from the battlefront. The time, date, location, event, and the names of the units depicted were carefully noted on the back. Historical officers attached to the same units as the artists would assess these compositions for accuracy and any breach of censorship before forwarding the pieces to London. After May 1945, the artists returned to Canada where the military provided studio space to complete a number of canvasses based on their earlier work. Despite their restrictive instructions, the new subject matter, and the dangerous surroundings, the war artists produced a remarkable legacy of the conflict. Their paintings range through a variety of styles and plumb the depths of human emotions shared by the 1.1 million who served and who witnessed the deaths of more than 42,000 of their comrades. As in the case of the First World War art scheme, there was some confusion among the government agencies involved as to what to do with the works once the war was over. Although the Cabinet ordered the Canadian War Records deposited with the National Gallery in 1946, a curator for them was not appointed until 1960. The second appointee, Major R.F. Wodehouse, did much to popularize the collection. First, he documented all the works, a task that resulted in a 1968 publication, Checklist of the War Collections. That year he also initiated a joint project with the National Gallery and the Department of National Defence to record Canada’s post-war military endeavours. The Canadian Armed Forces Civilian Artist Program (CAFCAP) resulted in the commissioning of nearly 600 works of art that capture the Canadian military experience in bases across Canada and on duty in locations ranging from Cyprus and Israel to Somalia and Croatia. The program was eliminated in a 1995 budget cut. In 1971, the gallery transferred the First and Second World War art collections, along with responsibility for CAFCAP, to the Canadian War Museum in Ottawa. Lacking extensive exhibition space, the museum has made the collections accessible through its website, and through a program of travelling exhibitions and loans. The works of war art are a unique legacy for all Canadians. Not only are they vivid depictions of military events inspired by personal experience, but they are also important elements in our nation’s art history. They constitute nothing less than a reflection of our national heritage.
Larry Matthews's insight:

Canada’s War Art | Dispatches | Learn | Canadian War Museum

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Larry Matthews
Scoop.it!

Winding River Art Gallery

Winding River Art Gallery | Nova Scotia Art | Scoop.it
Art gallery and gift shop...
Larry Matthews's insight:

Winding River Art Gallery

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Larry Matthews
Scoop.it!

Revenue Canada demotes Halifax sculptor to 'hobby artist' and gives him $14K tax bill | CBC News

Revenue Canada demotes Halifax sculptor to 'hobby artist' and gives him $14K tax bill | CBC News | Nova Scotia Art | Scoop.it
A Halifax sculptor says he was shocked and insulted by a Canada Revenue Agency ruling demoting him to the status of "hobby artist" and giving him a $14,500 tax bill.
Larry Matthews's insight:

Revenue Canada demotes Halifax sculptor to 'hobby artist' and gives him $14K tax bill | CBC News

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Larry Matthews
Scoop.it!

18 Real-Life Titanic Facts the Movie Didn't Tell You | 22 Words

18 Real-Life Titanic Facts the Movie Didn't Tell You | 22 Words | Nova Scotia Art | Scoop.it
You probably remember the craze that the Titanic film started. If you don't remember it, the fact that — 20 years later — the film is still the second-highest-grossing film of all time should clue you into the fact that people were really, really behind-the-scenes facts about the movie itself into the movie. We've already shared with you some, but there's so much out there that a single film couldn't possibly cover. With that in mind, here are 18 fascinating facts about the ship whose tragic story we just can't seem to get enough of. 1. For our first Titanic fact, we have to go quite a ways back. via: Imgur Back to before the ship was even built, as a matter of fact. In 1898 (14 years before the Titanic sank), Morgan Robertson wrote a novella titled The Wreck of the Titan: Or, Futility about a fictional ocean liner that sinks due to a collision with an iceberg. In the book, the ship is described as being “unsinkable” and doesn’t have enough lifeboats for everyone onboard. The similarities are pretty uncanny. Even downright spooky. 2. There were a lot of rich and famous people who almost were on the Titanic's fateful maiden voyage. via: Imgur The Hershey’s chocolate founder Milton S. Hershey had a ticket but did not board the ship. Guglielmo Marconi — the inventor of the telegraph — had been offered free passage on the Titanic but instead boarded the Lusitania (a ship that also sank, though not during Marconi’s voyage). J.P. Morgan was set to have his own private suite and promenade on the ship but canceled at the last minute to remain at a resort in France. Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt was one of the richest men in America who also had planned to sail on the Titanic but decided not to for some reason. Unfortunately, Vanderbilt died three years later on the Lusitania. The American novelist Theodore Dreiser also planned to board the Titanic but was talked out of his plan by an English publisher who advised him to take a cheaper boat. 3. Charles Herbert Lightoller was the second officer aboard the Titanic. via: Twitter He was also the most senior member of the ship’s crew to survive the sinking. During World War II, Lightoller provided and sailed as a volunteer one of the “little ships” that rescued the stranded Allied soldiers at Dunkirk. 4. Isidor Straus — co-owner of Macy's — died aboard the Titanic. via: Getty He and his wife Ida were traveling back from a winter spent in Europe when the ship struck the iceberg. Ida refused to leave Isidor and get into a lifeboat. She gave her maid her fur coat, stating that she would not be needing it. She’s reported as having said, “I will not be separated from my husband. As we have lived, so will we die, together.” They were last seen on deck together, standing arm-in-arm. In fact, this couple (from the film) was meant to represent the Strauses: via: Twitter Isidor’s body was recovered, brought to Nova Scotia, and eventually interred in the Straus mausoleum in Woodlawn Cemetery. Ida’s body, on the other hand, was never found. Her family elected instead to collect water from the shipwreck site, put it in an urn, and place the urn inside the same mausoleum. - THE STORY CONTINUES - Related Stories 19 Books Every Person Needs to Read Before They Die BY ROBIN ZLOTNICK 18 Midnight Snacks That Are Secretly Healthy but Taste Amazing BY GLENN CARREAU We're Obsessed With the Man Who Photoshopped Himself Into 25 Movie Posters BY GLENN CARREAU 34 Weird Childhood Toys That Will Give You Major Nostalgia BY CIERA CYPERT
Larry Matthews's insight:

18 Real-Life Titanic Facts the Movie Didn't Tell You | 22 Words

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Larry Matthews
Scoop.it!

Yarmouth airport lands film featuring Hollywood stars Dafoe and Pattinson - Nova Scotia

Yarmouth airport lands film featuring Hollywood stars Dafoe and Pattinson - Nova Scotia | Nova Scotia Art | Scoop.it
Business at the Yarmouth International Airport is taking off in a new direction, including leasing one of its hangars for a Hollywood film production called The Lighthouse.
Larry Matthews's insight:
Yarmouth airport lands film featuring Hollywood stars Dafoe and Pattinson - Nova Scotia
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Larry Matthews
Scoop.it!

Calling All Food Filmmakers! 8th annual Devour! The Food Film Fest is accepting submissions for the world’s largest food film festival – Devour! The Food Film Fest

Calling All Food Filmmakers! 8th annual Devour! The Food Film Fest is accepting submissions for the world’s largest food film festival – Devour! The Food Film Fest | Nova Scotia Art | Scoop.it
Wolfville, Nova Scotia (March 14, 2018) – Devour! The Food Film Fest, the world’s largest food film festival, is inviting emerging and established filmmakers to submit entries for its 8th annual edition, taking place October 24-28, 2018 in Wolfville, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Larry Matthews's insight:
Calling All Food Filmmakers! 8th annual Devour! The Food Film Fest is accepting submissions for the world’s largest food film festival – Devour! The Food Film Fest
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Larry Matthews
Scoop.it!

Artist uses steam engine from India to power personal lumber mill

Artist uses steam engine from India to power personal lumber mill | Nova Scotia Art | Scoop.it


A sound from the past comes through the car windows as you drive down the long laneway to Ralph Latham III’s place in Three Fathom Harbour, a sound at once familiar and hard to place.

Larry Matthews's insight:

Artist uses steam engine from India to power personal lumber mill

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Larry Matthews
Scoop.it!

7671 Highway 14 Hardwood Lands

7671 Highway 14 Hardwood Lands | Nova Scotia Art | Scoop.it


This lovely country bungalow is just 10 minutes from Superstore in Elmsdale located on a lovely country sized lot with paved drive and detached garage. Home features hardwood floors, master bedroom with ensuite and partially finished basement with ground level entrance. This is a nice home at a great price.

Call Larry Matthews to view 902-483-0754 or larry@easthants.com

Larry Matthews's insight:

7671 Highway 14 Hardwood Lands

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Larry Matthews
Scoop.it!

Louisbourg Playhouse

Louisbourg Playhouse | Nova Scotia Art | Scoop.it

Welcome to the 24th season of the Louisbourg Playhouse, a not-for-profit entertainment venue in Louisbourg, Nova Scotia. Established in 1994, the Louisbourg Playhouse has hosted world-class entertainers in an intimate and unique setting.

Larry Matthews's insight:

Louisbourg Playhouse

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Larry Matthews
Scoop.it!

Film producer and set designer taking part in Tatamagouche screening | Living | Truro Daily News

Film producer and set designer taking part in Tatamagouche screening | Living | Truro Daily News | Nova Scotia Art | Scoop.it

TATAMAGOUCHE, N.S.

Dylan Jenkinson is ready to share some of the experiences that go into the creation of a thriller.

Jenkinson, producer of NUMB, and Oscar-winning set designer Shane Vieau will be taking part in a question-and-answer

Larry Matthews's insight:

Film producer and set designer taking part in Tatamagouche screening

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Larry Matthews
Scoop.it!

Truro Sunstone Academy students displaying work at the Marigold | Living | Truro Daily News

Truro Sunstone Academy students displaying work at the Marigold | Living | Truro Daily News | Nova Scotia Art | Scoop.it

TRURO, N.S. – The first-time painters who have created art currently on display at the Marigold Cultural Centre are thrilled to have their work showcased.

The pieces were created by students – aged five to 11 – of Sunstone
Larry Matthews's insight:

Truro Sunstone Academy students displaying work at the Marigold

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Larry Matthews
Scoop.it!

'Remarkable spirit': Nova Scotia doctor shares stories of artist Maud Lewis ahead of auction | CBC News

'Remarkable spirit': Nova Scotia doctor shares stories of artist Maud Lewis ahead of auction | CBC News | Nova Scotia Art | Scoop.it
A Nova Scotia doctor has offered his thoughts on folk artist Maud Lewis ahead of one of her paintings being auctioned off by the Mennonite Central Committee in New Hamburg, Ont.
Larry Matthews's insight:

'Remarkable spirit': Nova Scotia doctor shares stories of artist Maud Lewis ahead of auction

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Larry Matthews
Scoop.it!

Maud Lewis | Art Gallery of Nova Scotia

Maud Lewis | Art Gallery of Nova Scotia | Nova Scotia Art | Scoop.it
MAUD LEWIS EARLY YEARS Maud Lewis (1903-1970) was born to John and Agnes Dowley on the Yarmouth and Acadian Shore of Nova Scotia. Although there is some debate about her exact birth place, recent research has revealed that Maud was born in the town of Yarmouth, NS. As a child, Maud spent most of her time alone, mostly because she felt uncomfortable about her differences around the other children. She had been born with almost no chin and was always much smaller than everyone else. However, Maud seemed to be a happy child who enjoyed the time she spent with her parents and brother. Maud's mother started her painting Christmas cards to sell and thus her career as an artist began. Her life and only experience of the world extended to an area between her birthplace in Yarmouth County and her married home in Marshalltown, Digby County. In 1935 Maud's father died and in 1937, her mother followed. As was typical at the time, her brother inherited the family home. After living with her brother for a short while she moved to Digby to live with her aunt. There she met Everett Lewis, an itinerant fish peddler, and married him shortly after in 1938.   LIFE IN THE HOUSE Maud spent the rest of her life living with Everett in their house in Marshalltown. The two had what has been perceived as a formidable companionship, despite any character flaws neighbors found in Everett. Because of Maud’s worsening rheumatoid arthritis, she was unable to do housework. Everett took care of the house, and Maud brought in money through her paintings. The two were a pair that Maud was proud to be a part of. The home they lived in was tiny in stature but large in character. Despite the lack of modern amenities like indoor plumbing and electricity, the house shows that Maud's life in Marshalltown was full of enjoyment through her art. Those who stopped after seeing her roadside sign, "Paintings for sale", found a quiet woman with a delightful smile. Her pleasure didn't come from the pride of having done a painting, but the creative act itself and the enjoyment others seemed to get from her work. Through newspaper and magazine articles, as well as television documentaries, Maud became well known and a reputation grew that’s still growing today. THE HOUSE After the death of Maud Lewis in 1970, and subsequently of her husband, Everett Lewis, in 1979, the lovingly painted home began to deteriorate. In reaction, a group of concerned citizens from the Digby area started the Maud Lewis Painted House Society; their only goal was to save this valued landmark. After a number of years of fundraising, the society realized that the project was going to take more resources than they could gather. In 1984, the house was sold to the Province of Nova Scotia and turned over to the care of Art Gallery of Nova Scotia. In 1996, with funds from the federal Department of Canadian Heritage and from private individuals, the processes of conservation and restoration began. The final, fully restored house is on permanent display in Halifax at the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia. MAUD LEWIS GALLERY MAUD LEWIS COLLECTION PRODUCTS The Art Gallery of Nova Scotia has a line of Maud Lewis products available at both its locations (Halifax and Yarmouth) as well as online. The Maud Lewis Collection line of products allows the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia to support initiatives at the Gallery that promote and inform the legacy of Maud Lewis. Visit us at our online shop for more information about these amazing products. SHOP MAUD LEWIS   "Maudie" In April 2017 Mongrel Media will release Maudie opening in select theatres across Canada. Academy Award® nominees Sally Hawkins (Happy-Go-Lucky, Blue Jasmine) and Ethan Hawke star in the true story of Maud Lewis, who overcame the physical challenge of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis to become one of Canada’s premier folk artists. (Mongrel Media) Images (Top to Bottom): Maud Lewis, White Cat (2), 1960s, oil on pulpboard, 31.1 x 33.8 cm. Collection of the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, gift of Johanna Hickey, Vancouver, BC, 2006. 2006.281; Maud Lewis, Fall Scene with Deer, c. 1950, oil on pulpboard, 29.5 x 34.9 cm. Collection of the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, purchase 1974. 1974.16; Maud Lewis, Maud Lewis House, mixed media, 4.1 x 3.8 m. Collection of the Art Gallery of Nova Scotia, purchased by the Province of Nova Scotia, 1984. A1998.1
Larry Matthews's insight:

Maud Lewis | Art Gallery of Nova Scotia

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Larry Matthews
Scoop.it!

Customs House Artisan Incubator – Cape Breton Centre for Craft

Customs House Artisan Incubator – Cape Breton Centre for Craft | Nova Scotia Art | Scoop.it
CUSTOMS HOUSE ARTISAN INCUBATOR We believe that your craft can be your business. We are offering a life-changing experience for emerging artists. The Customs House is a craft incubator in Port Hawkesbury, Nova Scotia. We’re looking for seven artists to become our first artists in residence. Are you a textile, clay or jewellery artist? As our artists in residence, you’ll have access to: Fully equipped studios Subsidized studio rent Craft business development support Technical mentorship Opportunities to take your craft to market Want to learn more? Contact Tamsin Sloots, Craft Incubator Coordinator, at tamsin@capebretoncraft.com or 902 539 7491 ext 116. Be bold. Take your chance today. Apply now. Download the application form today! For more information about Cape Breton Island, please view these resources:
Larry Matthews's insight:

Customs House Artisan Incubator – Cape Breton Centre for Craft

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Larry Matthews
Scoop.it!

The life and death of Nova Scotia's tiniest fishing village | CBC News

The life and death of Nova Scotia's tiniest fishing village | CBC News | Nova Scotia Art | Scoop.it
The tiny fishing village was Charlie Norris's love letter to the seaside community where he grew up. But in Nova Scotia, where folk artists achieve star status, his contribution is a mere footnote.
Larry Matthews's insight:

The life and death of Nova Scotia's tiniest fishing village | CBC News

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Larry Matthews
Scoop.it!

Deanne Fitzpatrick: Fabric Artist, Author Interview / Creativity-Portal.com

Deanne Fitzpatrick: Fabric Artist, Author Interview / Creativity-Portal.com | Nova Scotia Art | Scoop.it
Ideas and activities to open up your creativity.
Larry Matthews's insight:

Deanne Fitzpatrick: Fabric Artist, Author Interview / Creativity-Portal.com

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Larry Matthews
Scoop.it!

‘Maudie’ Wins Big At 2018 Canadian Screen Awards | ETCanada.com

‘Maudie’ Wins Big At 2018 Canadian Screen Awards | ETCanada.com | Nova Scotia Art | Scoop.it
Biopic "Maudie" was the big winner at the 2018 Canadian Screen Awards on Sunday, taking home awards in several of the top categories including Best Picture and Best Original Screenplay. Based on the true story of Nova Scotia folk artist Maude Lewis, a woman crippled with arthritis who, after a rough upbringing, finds herself married…
Larry Matthews's insight:
‘Maudie’ Wins Big At 2018 Canadian Screen Awards | ETCanada.com
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Larry Matthews
Scoop.it!

Top 5 Art Galleries in Halifax! | Discover Halifax

Top 5 Art Galleries in Halifax! | Discover Halifax | Nova Scotia Art | Scoop.it
Top 5 Art Galleries in Halifax! | Discover Halifax
Larry Matthews's insight:
Top 5 Art Galleries in Halifax! | Discover Halifax
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Larry Matthews
Scoop.it!

First-ever Steamtown String Fling debuts at Scranton Cultural Center on March 23

First-ever Steamtown String Fling debuts at Scranton Cultural Center on March 23 | Nova Scotia Art | Scoop.it
From a press release: The Scranton Cultural Center at the Masonic Temple has announced a third program in its regional musician showcases – the inaugural Steamtown String Fling. Featuring bluegrass, Americana, roots, folk, and Celtic music, the show will be headlined by Scranton’s own Dave Brown and the Dishonest Fiddlers and take place in the …
Larry Matthews's insight:
First-ever Steamtown String Fling debuts at Scranton Cultural Center on March 23
more...
No comment yet.