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Emergency surgery followed many missed chances to diagnose illness

Emergency surgery followed many missed chances to diagnose illness | Norcross Knight Physics | Scoop.it
Until he nearly died, the reason for Kevin Songer’s weak muscles went undetected for more than 50 years.
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70 Year Long Predicted Atomic Collapse State Finally Observed in Graphene

70 Year Long Predicted Atomic Collapse State Finally Observed in Graphene | Norcross Knight Physics | Scoop.it

The first experimental observation of a quantum mechanical phenomenon that was predicted nearly 70 years ago holds important implications for the future of graphene-based electronic devices. Working with microscopic artificial atomic nuclei fabricated on graphene, a collaboration of researchers led by scientists with the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the University of California (UC) Berkeley have imaged the "atomic collapse" states theorized to occur around super-large atomic nuclei.

 

"Atomic collapse is one of the holy grails of graphene research, as well as a holy grail of atomic and nuclear physics," says Michael Crommie, a physicist who holds joint appointments with Berkeley Lab's Materials Sciences Division and UC Berkeley's Physics Department. "While this work represents a very nice confirmation of basic relativistic quantum mechanics predictions made many decades ago, it is also highly relevant for future nanoscale devices where electrical charge is concentrated into very small areas."

 

Crommie is the corresponding author of a paper describing this work in the journal Science. The paper is titled "Observing Atomic Collapse Resonances in Artificial Nuclei on Graphene." Co-authors are Yang Wang, Dillon Wong, Andrey Shytov, Victor Brar, Sangkook Choi, Qiong Wu, Hsin-Zon Tsai, William Regan, Alex Zettl, Roland Kawakami, Steven Louie, and Leonid Levitov.

 

Originating from the ideas of quantum mechanics pioneer Paul Dirac, atomic collapse theory holds that when the positive electrical charge of a super-heavy atomic nucleus surpasses a critical threshold, the resulting strong Coulomb field causes a negatively charged electron to populate a state where the electron spirals down to the nucleus and then spirals away again, emitting a positron (a positively–charged electron) in the process. This highly unusual electronic state is a significant departure from what happens in a typical atom, where electrons occupy stable circular orbits around the nucleus.

 

"Nuclear physicists have tried to observe atomic collapse for many decades, but they never unambiguously saw the effect because it is so hard to make and maintain the necessary super-large nuclei," Crommie says. "Graphene has given us the opportunity to see a condensed matter analog of this behavior, since the extraordinary relativistic nature of electrons in graphene yields a much smaller nuclear charge threshold for creating the special supercritical nuclei that will exhibit atomic collapse behavior."

 

Perhaps no other material is currently generating as much excitement for new electronic technologies as graphene, sheets of pure carbon just one atom thick through which electrons can freely race 100 times faster than they move through silicon. Electrons moving through graphene's two-dimensional layer of carbon atoms, which are arranged in a hexagonally patterned honeycomb lattice, perfectly mimic the behavior of highly relativistic charged particles with no mass. Superthin, superstrong, superflexible, and superfast as an electrical conductor, graphene has been touted as a potential wonder material for a host of electronic applications, starting with ultrafast transistors.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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The Higgs Boson of our Connected World: | Networking Exchange ...

The Higgs Boson of our Connected World: | Networking Exchange ... | Norcross Knight Physics | Scoop.it
3 Ways the Network Powers the Applications Universe.
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Universe may not be expanding after all, new research suggests - Edmonton Journal

Universe may not be expanding after all, new research suggests - Edmonton Journal | Norcross Knight Physics | Scoop.it
Edmonton Journal Universe may not be expanding after all, new research suggests Edmonton Journal “String theory, for instance, is full of 'dualities' like this, which allow theorists to pick whichever view makes their calculations simpler.” If this...
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Some boson | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

Some boson | Flickr - Photo Sharing! | Norcross Knight Physics | Scoop.it
Some boson. ... TiC's wonderland (3 hours ago | reply). hehee - you can't hide from the Higgs boson! yanomano_have_a_click_on_me (2 hours ago | reply). u_r_a_silver_surfer. ☆. ♢ WolkenTräumer ♢ added this photo to their favorites.
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Electromagnetic 'swamps' don't always bog electrons down - Space Daily

Electromagnetic 'swamps' don't always bog electrons down - Space Daily | Norcross Knight Physics | Scoop.it
Electromagnetic 'swamps' don't always bog electrons downSpace DailyQuantum phase transitions are ubiquitous in modern physics, but are hard to study.
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Op-Ed: The God particle has finally been discovered

Op-Ed: The God particle has finally been discovered | Norcross Knight Physics | Scoop.it
On Wednesday, 4 July 2012, in Geneva, Switzerland, scientists working at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) announced that they have found the elusive Higgs boson particles, sometimes referred to as the God particle.
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