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M4.2 - 8km S of Galesburg, Michigan

M4.2 - 8km S of Galesburg, Michigan | New Lothrop Ecology | Scoop.it
USGS Earthquake Hazards Program, responsible for monitoring, reporting, and researching earthquakes and earthquake hazards
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How City Trees, Related Vegetation Reduce Pollution, Improve Health

How City Trees, Related Vegetation Reduce Pollution, Improve Health | New Lothrop Ecology | Scoop.it
However good urban density can be when measured at the whole-watershed scale, unless cities sufficiently integrate absorbent vegetation and related green infrastructure into the urban fabric, the impermeable pavement and rooftops associated with dens...
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Bottom Line... We can reduce the pressure on the environment by living in cities, and cities are better with trees.

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Plug tile drainage -on purpose?

Plug tile drainage -on purpose? | New Lothrop Ecology | Scoop.it
Plug is the wrong word. Using drainage control boxes on level fields can reduce phosphorus losses by 30% or more, and retain moisture for summer.
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From coastlines to the Everglades, researchers tackle sea level rise - Phys.Org

From coastlines to the Everglades, researchers tackle sea level rise - Phys.Org | New Lothrop Ecology | Scoop.it
Under the streets of Miami Beach, seeping up through the limestone, water creeps into storm drains and pours into the streets. It happens once a year when the sun and moon align in such a way that gravity pulls at Earth's water.
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Forest Fragmentation Threatens More Than Just Trees

Forest Fragmentation Threatens More Than Just Trees | New Lothrop Ecology | Scoop.it
Long-term studies on five continents show how chopping up forest hurts biodiversity.
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Wendell Berry's 6 favorite books about environmental protection - The Week Magazine

Wendell Berry's 6 favorite books about environmental protection - The Week Magazine | New Lothrop Ecology | Scoop.it
The poet and environmental activist recommends inspiring works about how to interact with the land
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Australia spells out plans to protect Great Barrier Reef

Australia spells out plans to protect Great Barrier Reef | New Lothrop Ecology | Scoop.it
MELBOURNE (Reuters) - Australia detailed on Monday how it will ban dumping of all dredge soil in the Great Barrier Reef as it looks to step up protection of the world's largest reef and avoid having it
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The best nature books of 2014 - The Guardian

The best nature books of 2014 - The Guardian | New Lothrop Ecology | Scoop.it
GrrlScientist: Today, I share a list of what I consider to be the best nature books of the year, hoping that you’ll find lots of interesting and unusual ideas for all the naturalists on your holiday gift-giving list!
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Hydrology: When wells run dry - Nature.com

Hydrology: When wells run dry
Nature.com
A global analysis reveals growing societal dependence on the use of non-renewable freshwater resources that depletes groundwater reserves and undermines human resilience to water scarcity in a warming world.
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Water's Role In The Rise And Fall Of The Roman Empire - RedOrbit

Water's Role In The Rise And Fall Of The Roman Empire - RedOrbit | New Lothrop Ecology | Scoop.it
Smart agricultural practices and an extensive grain-trade network enabled the Romans to thrive in the water-limited environment of the Mediterranean, a new study shows.
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World's population of mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fish has dropped a shocking 52 percent

World's population of mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fish has dropped a shocking 52 percent | New Lothrop Ecology | Scoop.it

The toll of human activity on the world's wildlife population over the past 40 years is devastating. The World Wildlife Fund's (WWF) recently released "2014 Living Planet Report"  shows that between 1970 and 2010, the population of mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fish around the globe has dropped a shocking 52 percent.

 

The report measures trends in three major areas: populations of more than ten thousand vertebrate species; human ecological footprint, a measure of consumption of goods, greenhouse gas emissions; and existing biocapacity, the amount of natural resources for producing food, freshwater, and sequestering carbon.

 

The report says that the majority of high-income countries are increasingly consuming more per person than the planet can accommodate; maintaining per capita ecological footprints greater than the amount of biocapacity available per person. People in middle- and low-income countries have seen little increase in their per capita footprints over the same time period.

 

The report underscores that the declining trends are not inevitable. To achieve globally sustainable development, each country’s per capita ecological footprint must be less than the per capita biocapacity available on the planet, while maintaining a decent standard of living.

At the conclusion of the report, WWF recommends three things:

 

Accelerate shift to smarter food and energy productionReduce ecological footprint through responsible consumption at the personal, corporate and government levelsValue natural capital as a cornerstone of policy and development decisions


Via Lauren Moss, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Nuno Gaspar de Oliveira's curator insight, October 16, 2014 5:52 AM

It's capital, the real capital, and it's disappearing #naturalcapital

LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, January 15, 2015 7:32 AM

When talking about "Global Warming" we think of the wrong processes—we take the median to be the issue, when in fact it's the weather extremes that cause the greatest havoc—yet still, "Climate Change" does not give the full picture, either. "Climate" refers to one meta-process, while "Change" is a word that many embrace as potentially positive. "Planetary Upheaval" may be a more generally accurate description of what we are facing.

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Nature Calling: Discovering winter fungi and lichens - Appleton Post Crescent

Nature Calling: Discovering winter fungi and lichens - Appleton Post Crescent | New Lothrop Ecology | Scoop.it
Explore the amazing world of lichens and fungi in the winter forest
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Where are the hotspots of plant diversity along boreal streams?

Where are the hotspots of plant diversity along boreal streams? | New Lothrop Ecology | Scoop.it
The patterns of plant species diversity along Swedish boreal streams are closely linked to flow of surface and sub-surface water. The linkages between vegetation and hydrology are tight, and according to Lenka Kuglerová they are threatened by poorly designed forest management. She defends her thesis ...
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Climate change ruled out as most dominant factor for watersheds

Climate change ruled out as most dominant factor for watersheds | New Lothrop Ecology | Scoop.it
A UBC-Chinese Academy of Sciences joint study shows that land cover plays as significant a role as climate change on the hydrology of watersheds.
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Important factors to consider as we begin to create the Misteguay Creek Watershed Plan.

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Mr. Delemeester's curator insight, March 21, 2015 12:14 PM

Important factors to consider as we begin to create the Misteguay Watershed Plan

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Reedy River supporters pursue new ideas for runoff control

Reedy River supporters pursue new ideas for runoff control | New Lothrop Ecology | Scoop.it
Each year, Greenville assesses a fee on most homes and businesses for stormwater management. Friends of the Reedy River is looking for alternatives to control stormwater runoff.
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Anthropocene Epoch: How You Became More Powerful Than Nature - Science 2.0

Anthropocene Epoch: How You Became More Powerful Than Nature - Science 2.0 | New Lothrop Ecology | Scoop.it
Science 2.0 Anthropocene Epoch: How You Became More Powerful Than Nature Science 2.0 It used to be that environmentalists were nihilists, they thought man was just a pathetic speck among the awesomeness of nature, but now environmentalists believe...
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Schools in Finland will no longer teach 'subjects'

Schools in Finland will no longer teach 'subjects' | New Lothrop Ecology | Scoop.it
For years, Finland has been the by-word for a successful education system, perched at the top of international league tables for literacy and numeracy.
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The Siberian crater saga is more widespread — and scarier — than anyone thought

The Siberian crater saga is more widespread — and scarier — than anyone thought | New Lothrop Ecology | Scoop.it

At the end of last summer came news of a bizarre occurrence no one could explain. It was a massive crater that just one day showed up. Early estimates placed it at nearly 100 feet in diameter, nestled deep in Siberia’s Yamal Peninsula, a place called “the ends of the Earth.”

 

The mystery deepened. The Siberian crater wasn’t alone. There were two more, ratcheting up the tension in a drama that hit its climax as a probable explanation surfaced. Global warming had thawed the permafrost, which had caused methane trapped inside the icy ground to explode. “Gas pressure increased until it was high enough to push away the overlaying layers in a powerful injection, forming the crater,” one German scientist said at the time.

 

Now, however, researchers fear there are more craters than anyone knew — and the repercussions could be huge. Russian scientists have now spotted a total of seven craters, five of which are in the Yamal Peninsula. Two of those holes have since turned into lakes. And one giant crater is rimmed by a ring of at least 20 mini-craters, the Siberian Times reported. Dozens more Siberian craters are likely still out there, said Moscow scientist Vasily Bogoyavlensky of the Oil and Gas Research Institute, calling for an “urgent” investigation.

 

He fears that if temperatures continue to rise — and they were five degrees higher than average in 2012 and 2013 — more craters will emerge in an area awash in gas fields vital to the national economy. “It is important not to scare people, but to understand that it is a very serious problem and we must research this,” he told the Siberian Times. “… We must research this phenomenon urgently, to prevent possible disasters.”

 

One potential disaster relates to the explosions themselves. No one has been hurt in any of the blasts, but given the size of some of the craters, it’s fair to say the methane bursts are huge. Researchers are nervous about even studying them. Who knows when a methane geyser will shoot off again?


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Tropical paradise inspires virtual ecology lab - Nature.com

Tropical paradise inspires virtual ecology lab - Nature.com | New Lothrop Ecology | Scoop.it
Digital version of Moorea will provide a way to experiment with an entire ecosystem.
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Jellyfish Barge: Biomimicry At Its Best - CleanTechnica

Jellyfish Barge: Biomimicry At Its Best - CleanTechnica | New Lothrop Ecology | Scoop.it
The Jellyfish Barge, if you have not heard word about it, is one potential worldwide food and water solution, which deserves high praise.
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LOIS HENRY: 7 things this storm won't do for the drought - Bakersfield Californian

LOIS HENRY: 7 things this storm won't do for the drought - Bakersfield Californian | New Lothrop Ecology | Scoop.it
The recent storms (and more to come) are definitely a salve on our collectively parched psyches.

But they aren't drought busters. Not by a long shot.
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Great Lakes see record water level recovery - Mansfield News Journal

Great Lakes see record water level recovery - Mansfield News Journal | New Lothrop Ecology | Scoop.it
After a record low point in January 2013, Lakes Michigan and Huron have gone on a record-breaking rebound.
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Planetary boundaries - Stockholm Resilience Centre

Planetary boundaries - Stockholm Resilience Centre | New Lothrop Ecology | Scoop.it
Advances the understanding of complex social-ecological systems with new insights into ecosystem management practices and long-term sustainability
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