Nimming recommends...
1.4K views | +0 today
Nimming recommends...
Anything that catches my eye - on technology, biology or education in general
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Nicole Masureik from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
Scoop.it!

What Happened When I Stopped Checking Homework

What Happened When I Stopped Checking Homework | Nimming recommends... | Scoop.it
Last year I wrote about a new strategy of not checking homework but assessing understanding through short quizzes. I thought this might be a good time to follow up with the results of that endeavor.

So, we are halfway through our second 9 weeks of school, and this is the first year where I started out not checking homework. In August, I carefully explained to students that there would be suggested homework problems and that even though I would not check their homework, there would be frequent quizzes to check their understanding.

The initial response was, “yay, no homework,” which quickly turned to “why does my grade look like this?”

Via John Evans
Nicole Masureik's insight:
Our maths dept do this too, and it seems to work. I wonder whether it would work in other subjects...
more...
Victor Ventura's curator insight, November 13, 2017 8:52 AM
If you are involved in the homework quandary or considering a change then this honest review of this teacher’s practice should help.
Koen Mattheeuws's curator insight, November 14, 2017 10:46 AM
Een boeiend verslag van een leerkracht die (voor hem) andere paden bewandelt. 
Rescooped by Nicole Masureik from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Transparent solar technology represents 'wave of the future'

Transparent solar technology represents 'wave of the future' | Nimming recommends... | Scoop.it
See-through solar materials that can be applied to windows represent a massive source of untapped energy and could harvest as much power as bigger, bulkier rooftop solar units, MSU scientists report in Nature Energy.

 

Led by engineering researchers at Michigan State University, the authors argue that widespread use of such highly transparent solar applications, together with the rooftop units, could nearly meet U.S. electricity demand and drastically reduce the use of fossil fuels.

 

“Highly transparent solar cells represent the wave of the future for new solar applications,” said Richard Lunt, the Johansen Crosby Endowed Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science at MSU. “We analyzed their potential and show that by harvesting only invisible light, these devices can provide a similar electricity-generation potential as rooftop solar while providing additional functionality to enhance the efficiency of buildings, automobiles and mobile electronics.”

 

Lunt and colleagues at MSU pioneered the development of a transparent luminescent solar concentrator that when placed on a window creates solar energy without disrupting the view. The thin, plastic-like material can be used on buildings, car windows, cell phones or other devices with a clear surface.

 

The solar-harvesting system uses organic molecules developed by Lunt and his team to absorb invisible wavelengths of sunlight. The researchers can “tune” these materials to pick up just the ultraviolet and the near-infrared wavelengths that then convert this energy into electricity (watch a demonstration of the process here).

 

Moving global energy consumption away from fossil fuels will require such innovative and cost-effective renewable energy technologies. Only about 1.5 percent of electricity demand in the United States and globally is produced by solar power.

 

But in terms of overall electricity potential, the authors note that there is an estimated 5 billion to 7 billion square meters of glass surface in the United States. And with that much glass to cover, transparent solar technologies have the potential of supplying some 40 percent of energy demand in the U.S. – about the same potential as rooftop solar units. “The complimentary deployment of both technologies,” Lunt said, “could get us close to 100 percent of our demand if we also improve energy storage.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicole Masureik from Ict4champions
Scoop.it!

Voice Typing in Google Docs

Voice Typing in Google Docs | Nimming recommends... | Scoop.it
Talk and type! In Google Docs, you can now simply talk for speech-to-text dictation if your computer has a microphone! Use ca

Via Maggie Verster
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicole Masureik from Digital Presentations in Education
Scoop.it!

Create a Dynamic Summary Slide Using the PowerPoint "Summary Zoom"

Create a Dynamic Summary Slide Using the PowerPoint "Summary Zoom" | Nimming recommends... | Scoop.it
If you want to quickly create a dazzling summary of your presentation that will surely wow your audience, look no further than creating a Summary Zoom slide in

Via Baiba Svenca
Nicole Masureik's insight:
Useful for topic recaps at the end, or as introductions to outline where you're hoping to get to
more...
Baiba Svenca's curator insight, September 18, 2017 12:02 PM

Cool PowerPoint feature!

Rescooped by Nicole Masureik from Biology resources for South African teachers
Scoop.it!

Insects' extinction: No insects, no food | DW English

Published on Sep 26, 2017
Insects pollinate many crop plants, but insect populations are collapsing, and not only in Germany. Pesticides, monocultures, and changes to the landscape are among the causes. What can be done to reverse the trend?


Via Andrew van Zyl
Nicole Masureik's insight:
No more killing bugs, people!
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicole Masureik from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Unique life form is half plant, half animal

Unique life form is half plant, half animal | Nimming recommends... | Scoop.it
Many animals transform themselves almost beyond recognition in the course of their lives. Caterpillars become butterflies and tadpoles become frogs, and if we couldn't watch them do so we might not even suspect that the two stages were the same creature.

 

Spectacular as these shifts are, they are only shape-shifting. A tadpole and a frog are both animals, so both must take in food from their surroundings. Not so Mesodinium chamaeleon. This newly discovered single-celled organism is a unique mixture of animal and plant. 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Nicole Masureik's insight:
Insight into how endosymbiosis works, & how our mitochondria may have developed
more...
Konstantinos Floridis's curator insight, October 1, 2017 5:31 PM
να το αντιπαραβαλω με τους μυξομυκητες.
Rescooped by Nicole Masureik from Ict4champions
Scoop.it!

10 Reasons to Screencast in Your Class and 7 Best-in-class Tools

10 Reasons to Screencast in Your Class and 7 Best-in-class Tools | Nimming recommends... | Scoop.it
“ A screencast is a video recording of what’s happening on your computer monitor, often with annotations and/or narration. It can be simple or sophisticated, anything from a whiteboard presentation t…”
Via Maggie Verster
Nicole Masureik's insight:
Helpful for those beginning the process
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicole Masureik
Scoop.it!

Feedback That Works

Feedback That Works | Nimming recommends... | Scoop.it
Teamwork and collaboration are bywords in education today, as they are in contemporary workplaces in all fields. More than ever, our daily tasks, our goals, and our overall performance are shaped and evaluated in collaborative settings, through peer and supervisory feedback. And it’s easy to agree that feedback can be a powerful tool for growth. Then why is it so hard to give feedback, and often even harder to hear it? Why do we feel that feedback misses the mark — that it’s generic or irrelevant, or, worse, that it’s undermining, or threatening?
Nicole Masureik's insight:
Great article on IQMS for teachers - how to do it right!
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicole Masureik from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

CDC confirms Zika virus causes microcephaly, other birth defects

CDC confirms Zika virus causes microcephaly, other birth defects | Nimming recommends... | Scoop.it
This confirms what researchers have suspected with mounting evidence about harms caused by the virus.

 

Federal health officials confirmed Wednesday that the Zika virus causes a rare birth defect and other severe fetal abnormalities, marking a turning point in an epidemic that has spread to nearly 40 countries and territories in the Americas and elsewhere.

 

Scientists at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention conducted a careful review of existing research and agreed that the evidence was conclusive, Director Thomas Frieden said. It is the first time a mosquito-borne virus has been linked to congenital brain defects.

 

"It is now clear, and CDC has concluded, that the virus causes microcephaly," Frieden said. CDC is launching more studies to determine whether children with that rare condition, which is characterized at birth by an abnormally small head, represent the "tip of the iceberg of what we could see in damaging effects on the brain and other developmental problems."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Nicole Masureik's insight:
We all thought as much, but how horrible to have it confirmed. My heart goes out to all those parents whose babies are affected, to the babies themselves, and to their extended families. What a tragedy for all concerned!
more...
Investors Europe Stock Brokers's curator insight, April 13, 2016 10:24 PM

"It is now clear, and CDC has concluded, that the virus causes microcephaly," Frieden said. CDC is launching more studies to determine whether children with that rare condition, which is characterized at birth by an abnormally small head, represent the "tip of the iceberg of what we could see in damaging effects on the brain and other developmental problems."

Scooped by Nicole Masureik
Scoop.it!

Creating Self-Checking "Scavenger Hunts" Using Google Forms - Synergyse

Creating Self-Checking "Scavenger Hunts" Using Google Forms - Synergyse | Nimming recommends... | Scoop.it
Increase engagement and implement formative assessment with this great activity using Google Forms. Everything you need is in this post!
Nicole Masureik's insight:
What a great idea! Thanks for sharing!
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicole Masureik from Biology resources for South African teachers
Scoop.it!

Bacteria From Beards Could Help Develop New Antibiotics I VOA

Published on Feb 3, 2016
Research conducted in London has determined that some of the bacteria growing in men's beards have antibiotic properties. The discovery is important at a time when the overuse of man-made antibiotics is making pathogenic bacteria strains increasingly resistant to treatment.


Via Andrew van Zyl
Nicole Masureik's insight:
WAY cool!! We grow our own strains of bacteria, and they could really help us too.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicole Masureik
Scoop.it!

slow education – There's a Hadeda in my Garden

slow education – There's a Hadeda in my Garden | Nimming recommends... | Scoop.it
Posts about slow education written by There's a Hadeda in my Garden
Nicole Masureik's insight:
Wow - so well said! SO well said! How do we slow them (and ourselves) down?
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicole Masureik from iPads, MakerEd and More in Education
Scoop.it!

The Ultimate App Guide for Students – Infographic ~ EdTech & MLearning

The Ultimate App Guide for Students – Infographic ~ EdTech & MLearning | Nimming recommends... | Scoop.it
Studying is a necessary activity that few enjoy. The key to good study is organisation. An ad-hoc approach to studying may seem like you are getting things covered but in the long run you are likely to miss important topics. By taking a formatted and structured route to your study plan, you will likely be more relaxed and feel more prepared for examinations when they come around. With anything in life, accepting help is a good idea and in the case of studying, you can gain great help by utilising smartphone and tablet apps which will help to increase your efficiency. This guide from Study Medicine Europe gives a useful guide on apps that may enhance your studying efforts. Some are free and some are paid versions and they are split up according to different goals. Check it
out below!

Via John Evans
Nicole Masureik's insight:

I love this infographic - clearly and simply identifies one excellent app for each stage of the study cycle to create a holistic approach to studying.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicole Masureik from The DigiTeacher
Scoop.it!

A Digital Architecture for Education: Technology Transformation from Inside Out

A Digital Architecture for Education: Technology Transformation from Inside Out | Nimming recommends... | Scoop.it
By James Hope Note: James is Head of Digital Strategy at a leading independent boys school Trust in London. James previously worked in Digital Strategy and Transformation at Deloitte, leading technology transformation programmes in data and information strategy for organisations including BP, the European Bank and Cancer Research. For more details you can find James on LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/jamesdometthope/   Introduction Having landed on this page you must already have some conviction to the idea that digital technology is a force for good in our schools, colleges and universities. Yet you, like I, will most probably know fellow educators that profoundly …

Via Dorian Love
more...
Dorian Love's curator insight, November 8, 2017 12:36 AM
A very useful discussion of the real issues schools need to address in any ed tech programme!
Rescooped by Nicole Masureik from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Read My Rings: The Oldest Living Tree Tells It All

Read My Rings: The Oldest Living Tree Tells It All | Nimming recommends... | Scoop.it

1964, a geologist in the Nevada wilderness discovered the oldest living thing on earth, after he killed it. The young man was Donald Rusk Currey, a graduate student studying ice-age glaciology in Eastern Nevada; the tree he cut down was of the Pinus longaeva species, also known as the Great Basin bristlecone pine. Working on a grant from the National Science Foundation, Currey was compiling the ages of ancient bristlecone trees to develop a glacial timeline for the region.

 

Currey’s ring count for this particular tree reached backward from the present, past the founding of the United States, the Great Crusades, and even the Greek and Roman Empires, to the time of the ancient Egyptians. Sheltered in an unremarkable grove near Wheeler Peak, the bristlecone he cut down was found to be nearly 5,000 years old, taking root only a few hundred years after human history was first recorded. How could a half-dead pine barely 20 feet tall outdo the skyscraper-height sequoias, commonly thought to be the oldest trees alive?

 

The longevity of Great Basin bristlecones was first recognized in the 1950s by Dr. Edward Schulman, who shocked a scientific community that believed in a correlation between long lifespan and great size. Schulman systematically sampled Great Basin bristlecones in California and Nevada, and published his findings in a 1958 National Geographic article, which revealed several of the trees to be more than 4,000 years old. Schulman’s analysis supported the idea that “adversity begets longevity,” or that the severe conditions in which the bristlecone pine evolved actually helped extend its lifespan.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicole Masureik from Educational cartoons and jokes
Scoop.it!

Twitter for Teachers Infographic - e-Learning Infographics

Twitter for Teachers Infographic - e-Learning Infographics | Nimming recommends... | Scoop.it
The Twitter for Teachers Infographic, 8 Tips On How To Use Twitter For Social Learning, The Teacher Guide to Twitter, Ultimate List of Educational Hashtags
Via Maggie Verster
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicole Masureik from Biology resources for South African teachers
Scoop.it!

Why does the flu vaccine fail so often--and what can we do to fix it? I ScienceMagazine

Published on Sep 20, 2017
The complex factors behind failure are coming into sharper focus


Via Andrew van Zyl
Nicole Masureik's insight:
It always works for me, but I know it doesn't work for many people... this may explain why.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicole Masureik from Biology resources for South African teachers
Scoop.it!

These 3D animations could help you finally understand molecular science I PBS

Published on Sep 21, 2017
Art and science have in some ways always overlapped, with early scientists using illustrations to depict what they saw under the microscope. Janet Iwasa of the University of Utah is trying to re-establish this link to make thorny scientific data and models approachable to the common eye. Iwasa offers her brief but spectacular take on how 3D animation can make molecular science more accessible.


Via Andrew van Zyl
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicole Masureik
Scoop.it!

19 Big and Small Classroom Management Strategies

Emphasize the obvious, keep things fresh, and be honest. Showing students that it pays to behave and respecting them as individuals greatly enhance classroom management.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicole Masureik
Scoop.it!

17 Great Apps That'll Make Your Life Easier

17 Great Apps That'll Make Your Life Easier | Nimming recommends... | Scoop.it
Always looking for new ways to get more done at work, and quickly? Check at these 17 apps to boost your productivity throughout the work week.
Nicole Masureik's insight:
Some great productivity apps to help you maximise your time.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicole Masureik from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

A flexible sheet camera: A radically different approach to imaging

A flexible sheet camera: A radically different approach to imaging | Nimming recommends... | Scoop.it

The Columbia team, which includes research engineer Daniel Sims BS'14 and postdoctoral researcher Yonghao Yue, designed and fabricated a flexible lens array that adapts its optical properties when the sheet camera is bent. This optical adaptation enables the sheet camera to produce high quality images over a wide range of sheet deformations. Sims will present the work at the International Conference on Computational Photography (ICCP) at Northwestern University in Evanston, IL, May 13 to 15.

 

"Cameras today capture the world from essentially a single point in space," says Nayar. "While the camera industry has made remarkable progress in shrinking the camera to a tiny device with ever increasing imaging quality, we are exploring a radically different approach to imaging. We believe there are numerous applications for cameras that are large in format but very thin and highly flexible."

 

If such an imaging system could be manufactured cheaply, like a roll of plastic or fabric, it could be wrapped around all kinds of things, from street poles to furniture, cars, and even people's clothing, to capture wide, seamless images with unusual fields of view. This design could also lead to cameras the size of a credit card that a photographer could simply flex to control its field of view.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Nicole Masureik's insight:
Awesome! Technology is just so cool!!
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Nicole Masureik from levin's linkblog: Knowledge Channel
Scoop.it!

Scientists may have found evidence that chimps believe in god

Scientists may have found evidence that chimps believe in god | Nimming recommends... | Scoop.it
New footage shows chimpanzees engaging in bizarre behaviour — which might be a form of sacred ritual that could show the beginnings of a kind of religious belief.
Via Levin Chin
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicole Masureik
Scoop.it!

Teaching like it's 2999: Google Chrome Tricks: Raising the [Omni] Bar

Teaching like it's 2999: Google Chrome Tricks: Raising the [Omni] Bar | Nimming recommends... | Scoop.it
If you aren't already using Google Chrome as your web browser, I strongly suggest you dig in and give it a try. In addition to ubiquitous access to your open tabs and bookmarks, there are also the excellent extensions and the omnipotent OmniBox.
Nicole Masureik's insight:
This has a lot of interesting ways to customise the "url bar", which is now actually an omni box - even to the point of adding Calendar events to your Google calendar! Way cool!
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicole Masureik
Scoop.it!

Psychopathic schools

Psychopathic schools | Nimming recommends... | Scoop.it
Some of my boarding school colleagues have a frenzied start to the day. Overseeing morning roll call in a fog of morning breath, checking that all the boys are present and correct, making sure they are dressed correctly, clean shaven, hair suitably brushed and off to breakfast. These days it also involves dispensing large quantities…
Nicole Masureik's insight:
And here's part two on the blog post about slowing down education. Very helpful ideas at the end.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Nicole Masureik
Scoop.it!

Study of Holocaust survivors finds trauma passed on to children's genes

Study of Holocaust survivors finds trauma passed on to children's genes | Nimming recommends... | Scoop.it
New finding is clear example in humans of the theory of epigenetic inheritance: the idea that environmental factors can affect the genes of your children
Nicole Masureik's insight:

What a fascinating article on real-life epigenetics in humans!

more...
No comment yet.