Nicole Berard's Portfolio ACOM 375
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Nicole Berard's Portfolio ACOM 375
Exploring Ways of CMC
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Mode 3: Twitter

Mode 3: Twitter | Nicole Berard's Portfolio ACOM 375 | Scoop.it

In this blog I will discuss the third mode I chose to discuss in Quan-Haase’s article. Twitter is a new form of communication especially among the college students as an entertainment and educational tool. My own personal Twitter account includes both of these topics. I was originally asked to design one for class and incorporate my “tweets” in assignments over the course of the semester. However I found Twitter as an excellent source of connecting with local and distant friends.

 

Quan-Haase’s study showed interesting results regarding online communication being the top source for communication. Twitter is no exception to this idea because it allows you to interact back and forth to anyone or anything with a simple hash tag. With the constant updates in statuses you are able to see what is happening in other places and countries. Your friends update whats going on in their lives so you are to keep in contact with how they are doing. The majority of time I spend on Twitter is to interact with friends as to many college kids today. The overall sum of the studies done by Quan-Haase have certainly shown some early insights in understanding student culture today and the patterns they go about communicating with one another. Twitter is no exception to the patterns in today’s CMC mode. Other businesses and professional groups are recognizing this and are becoming users of Twitter so that they too can find the successes that the younger generations seem to have grasped.

 

Resources:

 

Quan-Haase, A. (2007). University students’ local and distant social ties: Using and integrating modes of communication on campus Information, Communication & Society 10 (5), October 2007, pp. 671–693

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Mode 1: Youtube

In this blog I will be discussing one of the modes of computer-mediated communication based off the reading by Anabel Quan-Haase. In the article she mentions how college students have based most of their communication primarily through internet use. The mode I chose to have a huge impact in the college environment and the communication we tend to use is YouTube. Typically, you would not think of YouTube as a form of communication because it is mainly videos and serves for entertainment purposes. However, the video for our class was to introduce our class’s Group Project and inform viewers about the benefits of using a Facebook.

 

This mode of CMC has shown great success by allowing people to interact within the video by adding comments and ideas below. YouTube is in fact an interactive site, and according to Quane-Haase’s article, is one of the most preferred forms of online communication. People like not only visually seeing the information given but the chance to discuss it as well. Sometimes, the best way to learn from some people is if they have something visual to base it off of, a “visual learner.” Our You Tube was very successful in helping us spread the word and interact among our students and other viewers to fulfill our message. We use Facebook in both entertainment and educational purposed, so we felt that a You Tube video would be extremely persuasive mode of computer mediate communication.

 

YouTube is a clearly highlighted example of a mode of communication discussed within the teachings of Quan-Haase. It’s visually based learning has allowed others to interact and communicate among a given video which has played a large role in the success and user rate of YouTube.

 

Resources:

 

Quan-Haase, A. (2007). University students’ local and distant social ties: Using and integrating modes of communication on campus Information, Communication & Society 10 (5), October 2007, pp. 671–693

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Community Building through Facebook

Community Building through Facebook | Nicole Berard's Portfolio ACOM 375 | Scoop.it

This blog is dedicated to the topic of community building based off of the reading by Ellison, Steinfeld, and Lampe. In this article the idea of Facebook as one of the resources that is extremely helpful in bridging social capital. Social capital refers to the connections made within and between social networks. Facebook is one of the most popular social networking sites ever to hit the internet and has certainly help keep ties and build a “virtual community” of friends, followers, and family. However, this does not distract people from the outside world, as many researchers will argue, but rather enhance a person’s social ties even at a great distance. I chose to use my Group 3’s Facebook account to show how we use Facebook in order to promote and build our community of followers.

 

Because this is a promotional Facebook page we were very selective as to who we would want to reach out to. Typically, an individual’s Facebook would consist of social ties between friends and families. Then the expansion of community would grow through their friend’s friends and so on. However, because our page was more for an educational purpose we wanted to build a community that was also strictly on an educational basis. According to the article, “researchers have emphasized the importance of Internet-based linkages by the formation of weak ties, which serve as the foundation of bridging social capital” (Ellison, Steinfeld, and Lampe.) For our Facebook page finding friends that fall under weak ties were something we were looking to achieve. These friends would include certain businesses in the Albany region that I mentioned previously we would hope to find. Then hopefully our network would grow by seeing other businesses our friends would associate and so forth. Another idea mentioned within the reading was that social networking sites support both the maintenance of existing social ties and the formation of new connections. On our Facebook page we used our classmates of ACOM 375 as existing social ties to enhance our community of friends. That way, the news about the importance of having a Facebook could hopefully reach more people.

 

As you can see my example of Community Building through Facebook really shows how social networking and the ability to enhance social capital can beneficial in more ways than one. With constant interacting you can take things you discover online and become proactive by using them offline as well. Facebook has taken CMC by storm and is no longer a college social network but a necessary means of communication all over the world.

 

Resources:

Ellison, N. B., Steinfield, C., & Lampe, C. (2007). The benefits of Facebook "friends:" Social capital and college students' use of online social network sites. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 12(4), article 1. http://jcmc.indiana.edu/vol12/issue4/ellison.html

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Identity development: Promoting Myself through LinkedIn

Identity development: Promoting Myself through LinkedIn | Nicole Berard's Portfolio ACOM 375 | Scoop.it

 

This blog is a discussion on how I was able to self-promote myself and develop a professional identity based off the readings of Ellison, Heino, and Gibbs. CMC Communication allows you to create profiles for a variety of things, Facebook, online dating sites, and LinkedIn are just some of those places where your identity can be expressed and developed. The online dating research mentioned within the article of Ellison, Heino, and Gibbs had many useful ideas found in their research that happened to match my experiences on LinkedIn. Developing an identity on the internet can sometimes be misleading, people will try and promote themselves in ways that are many times inaccurate untrue. Although that may be the case for places like an online dating site, this typically would not be something you would want to do on LinkedIn because of its professionalism. One idea mentioned within the article said that “the greater control over self-presentational behavior in CMC allows individuals to manage their online interactions more strategically.” This idea is entirely true in LinkedIn because the primary reasons people sign up for the site is to look for job offerings or potential clients. So in order for you to be recognized you highlight your school experience, job skills, life skills, and other interesting things about you.

 

On LinkedIn, although my full identity is not exposed like Facebook, I was still able to highlight many things about myself. In the article the authors mention three form of “self” that are made ina given environment. They are the actual, ideal, and ought to be self. In Linked In it is hard to distinguish between which “self” is more appropriate to bring out. One would normally think that the ought to be self is what should be highlighted. However, after overlooking how I promoted myself nothing I said or added in my profile is something that hasn’t been accomplished or capable of me not being able to do. Showing you actual self allows viewers to see that you are truthful and not highlighting something that seems questionable or illegitimate. If you receive a job interview because someone took notice to your LinkedIn which highlighted things that you had never accomplished, when it came time to do your interview you would be held responsible to the things you added to your profile and you could potentially get caught for lying.

 

Overall LinkedIn was able to highlight many professional attributes about myself in order to develop my identity into one suitable for the workplace.

 

Resources:

 

Ellison, N., Heino, R., & Gibbs, J. (2006). Managing impressions online: Self-presentation processes in the online dating environment. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 11(2), article 2.http://jcmc.indiana.edu/vol11/issue2/ellison.html

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LinkedIn: An Example of Formal CMC

LinkedIn: An Example of Formal CMC | Nicole Berard's Portfolio ACOM 375 | Scoop.it

This blog post is an example of formal communication that was based off the readings of Stefan Hrastinski . In order to highlight formal CMC I decided to use Linked In. There are many qualities mentioned within the reading that formal CMC contains, however, Linked In does share some informal qualities as well. In Linked In the qualities of formal CMC outweigh informal because my page, based off of the reading, includes things like authority-organization, Content- Focus, Organized Language and being something that is mandatory.

 

Having Linked In allows me to communicate among professionals and businesses around the country. Although it allows you to interact with one another back and forth the language used within your page has to be well thought out and formal. The site allows you to interact in an authority-organized manner in the sense that they speak to you in regards to potential job opportunities.

 

Unlike Facebook and other social networking sites Linked In is very Content- Focused. You are promoting yourself on this site to not only show skills but impress potential businesses and/or clients. What you put on your profile is very formal whether it may be a resume or educational awards and interests. The language is clearly organized into categories, education, connections, recommendations are just some of the things you will find among your profile's content.

 

Lastly I found the Linked In site to be mandatory even though it was not something that could have been detrimental to our class grade. I think that its something every college student should have, especially if they are seeking to find employment after graduation. It is a great way to promote yourself and reach people and businesses that you never thought you could ever get in touch with. That way finding a job will be easier and stress-free.

 

Resources:

Hrastinski, S. (2010). Informal and formal dimensions of computer-mediated communication: A model. International Journal of Networking and Virtual Organizations, 7(1), 23-38. Available at: http://is2.lse.ac.uk/asp/aspecis/20080188.pdf

 

 

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Mode 2: Facebook

Mode 2: Facebook | Nicole Berard's Portfolio ACOM 375 | Scoop.it

In this blog I will be discussing a second example of a mode of CMC, using the article by Anabel Quan-Haase as a reference. There has been a dramatic shift in the way we communicate from face-to-face to online-based interaction in our society. It has recently become one of the top ways to communicate which has given us many benefits in connecting with ties all across the world. The mode I found to coincide with what was discussed within the article is Facebook. I chose my own Facebook account to show how it reflects Quan-Haase’s mode of communication. Because I found that Facebook allows me to interact synchronously with instant messaging I felt it was appropriate to use as it was mentioned as one of the top ways students look to communicate with others.

 

There are other ideas that make Facebook a perfect example of the articles modes of communication. Online communication among college students has been largely associated with local communication with some gaps for those far away. Taking a look at my own Facebook account shows that exactly. I interact with those I see every day as well as my family and friends who are back home in Rhode Island. Like the article states online communication, especially through Facebook, was a huge help in the transitioning into college as a freshmen. I was able to keep close tabs with my brother, boyfriend, and high school friends without having to see them face-to-face. Coming from a class perspective I was also able to communicate with my classmates regarding upcoming projects and assignments for the class. From the findings mentioned in the article friends were considered the most frequently sought after person to communicate through the internet. I have found that Facebook reflects this idea tremendously. My parents are ones that I speak with on the phone rather than on the computer. The only family I speak to on the Facebook are my brother and cousins. On a daily basis my friends are who I look to keep in contact with.

 

As you can see, Facebook has clearly set the standards for a mode of CMC. With its asynchronous and synchronous qualities it has certainly established itself as the most popular way students look to communicate with each other.

 

Resources:

Quan-Haase, A. (2007). University students’ local and distant social ties: Using and integrating modes of communication on campus Information, Communication & Society 10 (5), October 2007, pp. 671–693

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CMC Language in Twitter

CMC Language in Twitter | Nicole Berard's Portfolio ACOM 375 | Scoop.it

 

This blog post is dedicated to the article by Susan C. Herring, discussing the components associated with CMC language. Her article directly focuses on studying the language and language use in computer-based communication. Today most of the communicating is done through “text-based” messages that are typed on the keyboard. The example I found to have an interesting display of CMC language was through my Twitter account. This text based site is a new social networking site that involves “tweets” or written text in the form of a status or response to another person. Twitter allows people to say what they feel in any written way they choose. There is a variety of language diversity among the site from simple abbreviated messages to professional and well thought out “tweets.”

 

There are many references among Herring’s reading that strongly correlate to my example of Twitter. Like mentioned above, the site is text based. All of my communication is done by typing out texts on the keyboard. Twitter is what Herring calls an Asynchronous CMD system, which means messages can be sent and received without that person being logged on. Once you send a “tweet” to someone that person will be able to see it the minute they log onto their own Twitter account. On my own account the tweets I send regarding in-class activities are sent to the class account and are checked by my professor when she is available to look at them. The article also mentions that people’s perception of CMC language is poor, and difficult to understand. However, this language isn’t damaged but something completely new. The old language has been altered and certainly not polished in any way. On Twitter you will find many people use their own form of abbreviations and language to match the persona they want to reflect. On my Twitter account only the people of my Communications class would understand exactly what I am tweeting at. The language spoken on the internet, especially Twitter and other social networking sites, is not something that would be used if a person was face-to face. However with the expansion and popularity of CMC the new language has transformed the way we write and communicate online in a more casual setting. However, you will find that many professionals have kept the old way of communicating so that it is understandable to a wide range of viewers, especially those of the older generations.

 

Twitter is an example of how language online is so unique and diverse among cultural and business groups. With this variety there has been a shift in interest to the study of CMC language. Overall, there has been positive feedback in regards to communication language among people allowing them to express themselves in a way they feel most comfortable and understood.

 

Resources:

Herring, S. (Classification) (2007) A Faceted Classification Scheme for Computer-Mediated Discourse. Language@Internet (4). Available at http://www.languageatinternet.de/articles/2007/761/index_html/

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BB Discussion Board: Informal Communciation

BB Discussion Board: Informal Communciation | Nicole Berard's Portfolio ACOM 375 | Scoop.it

 

In this blog I will be discussing the use of Informal CMC within our class as discussed in the article by Hrastinski. Within the reading the ideas of informal and formal communication are compared and contrasted to show how they relate and differ as a means of communicating through the computer. For my example of Informal Communication I used our Group 3 discussion bored to reflect how computer mediated communication can be done informally.

 

According to the reading by Hrastinski, there are many qualities informal communication can contain. This discussion bored was primarily done to send and discuss our Class Project as a way for all of us to keep in touch and stay on schedule. To start, the discussion bored was unscheduled. There were no specific times each of us had to write something on it. All the times displayed are on random days and by only a few people in the group used it, making it also random in participation. The discussion board is an interactive place meaning people can write and comment back and forth to one another about a given topic. The messages are extremely rich in content. Everyone’s posts were primarily topics that they had written for the paper we were asked to write. That way, one person was able to piece the entire thing together. Because most of the posts were for a paper the writing was in fact formal, making it more of formal CMC, however, that was primarily because it was for something that was to be graded and looked at by our professor. The content mentioned on our bored is specifically dedicated to the project. We are very specific in what we write and incorporate onto it. One last and probably biggest quality that makes the discussion bored an informal way to communicate was that it was low cost, the access to Blackboard is free to all students.

 

As you can see the use of informal language can many times be a means to help discuss something of importance, in this case, our class project. With the help of interactive CMC we are able to keep in touch and stay connected as a group and bounce ideas off one another. Formal and Informal communication can many times be hard to distinguish on deciding which had been used. However, this example is a clear example where informal communication had come into play.

 

Resources:

 

Hrastinski, S. (2010). Informal and formal dimensions of computer-mediated communication: A model. International Journal of Networking and Virtual Organizations, 7(1), 23-38. Available at: http://is2.lse.ac.uk/asp/aspecis/20080188.pdf

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Filtering/Curating with Twitter Example

Filtering/Curating with Twitter Example | Nicole Berard's Portfolio ACOM 375 | Scoop.it

In this blog post I will be discussing Filtering and Curating based off the readings of Masullo-Chen and Gorman. The purpose for this discussion is to show how the use of my Twitter account throughout the semester has allowed me to filter and curate the information that specifically meets my needs and interests. To start, filtering is defined as keeping away things that share no interest to me. While curating allows resources and things I need to be categorized and identified. As many people involved with CMC know, the more internet traffic leading to a specific resource the more it is claimed to be legitimate.

 

For Twitter the use of filtering and curating is done by using a number of the tools you can access with an account. These things to help curate and filter out certain unimportant resources can be done by using hash tags, key words, and labels on what you write. This helps the reader identify what is legitimate and what is not. Also, by clicking on the Favorite button you are letting the site know that you are extremely interested in this particular organization or message and will help curate the information to your specific needs. The same happens when you follow someone. Your home page filters out all the tweets you received to those you mainly follow whether it is friends or an organization or news source. On my wall you will find hash tags saying #uacmc which is connecting my messages to my professor and making sure that she receives them and curate all of my assignments as well as my classmates. I also follow many of my friends and organizations that I am most interested in.

 

One big thing I noticed among Twitter is the separation of news from what is real to what is fake. According to the short clip by Gorman there is a reference to a sight called “Storyful” to help filter out the top legitimate news stories, videos and tweets. This is done by a large group of employees who curate all of the resources onto a playlist on YouTube, and the Storyful website. That way people are receiving news that is guaranteed to be legitimate and also up to date anywhere around the world.

 

Resources:

Gorman, T. (2011) Social Media Curation Tool Storyful Helps Separate News From Noise. Available at

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2011/04/social-media-curation-tool-separates-news-from-noise.html

 

Masullo-Chen, G. (2011) How to use twitter hashtag. Save the media blog. Available at http://savethemedia.com/2011/03/04/howtousetwitterhashtag/

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The Dummy's Guide to Effectively Promote Yourself on The Book (Networking Example)

The Dummy's Guide to Effectively Promote Yourself on The Book (Networking Example) | Nicole Berard's Portfolio ACOM 375 | Scoop.it

This blog is an example of "Networking" which was thoroughly discussed in the article written by Boyd and Ellison (2008) "Social Network Sites: Definition, History, and Scholarship." Social Networking is an increasingly growing way in which businesses and academics are looking to expand their ways of communicating. In the article they mention some of the top sites, Facebook being one of them. The Facebook page I decided to incorporate in my example of Networking was our Group Project's page on how a business can promote themselves on Facebook. With its helpful tools and explanations our page we want to show businesses that they are able to attract people to the goods and services they have to offer, one of the components mentioned within the article.

 

Boyd and Ellison define three key components to a social networking site. This online site (in this case Facebook) allows us to "(1)construct a public or semi-public profile within a bounded system(2) articulate a list of other users with whom they share a connection, and (3) view and traverse their list of connections and those made by others within the system" (page 2.) This leaves businesses with room to grow and expand themselves with their own unique ways. For our online Facebook example we clearly define the tools that are unfamiliar to those businesses who know nothing of "the book" and teach them how to get started and create their own profile, expand friendships, and see others who they may find useful to them.

 

What was once a strictly college based social networking site in 2004 has no become a widespread globally-bound site that now reaches CMC among friends but with organizations and businesses. The site I had chosen is a clear example of just how much Networking has changed and how helpful it truly is to those who are looking to pursue it. In this websit I used networking to try and promote our project and hopefully influence businesses in joining facebook.

 

Resources:

Boyd d. m., & Ellison, N.B (2007) "Social networking sites: Definition, history, and scholarship." Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, 13(1), article 11. Available at Library in eholding database.

 

 

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