Nick Schmidt's Midsummer Night Dream
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Literary Criticism: New Readings of A Midsummer Night's Dream

EBSCOhost (ebscohost.com) serves thousands of libraries and other institutions with premium content in every subject area. Free LISTA: LibraryResearch.com
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Hunter, William B. "New Readings of A Midsummer Night's Dream." EBSCOhost. N.p., Fall 2002. Web. 4 Mar. 2013.

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Source: Science and the Occult: The Discovery of Witchcraft: Who They Be That Are Called Witches.

Source: Science and the Occult: The Discovery of Witchcraft: Who They Be That Are Called Witches. | Nick Schmidt's Midsummer Night Dream | Scoop.it

A chapter from the book "Shakespeare's World: Background Readings in the English Renaissance," by Gerald M. Pinciss and Roger Lockyer is presented. It discusses the general fear and horror associated with the evil of witchcraft during the Renaissance. It says that frequently those accused of practicing black magic were ignorant, old and poor women. It explains that misfortunes with no obvious explanation were blamed on witches. Further, it says that a growing doubt that human beings possessed invisible powers diminished the fear of witchcraft.

Nicholas Schmidt's insight:

This selection talks on the subject of witchcraft and evil during Shakespeare's time. It also touches upon how these ideas specifically affect the plots of works such as A Midsummer Night’s Dream. This being the hardest category to find, I had to settle on a piece that only touched upon a specific connection to the text, rather than it being completely about one connection. The fear and the interest in witchcraft in the time of the renaissance would have fueled a lot of interest in this play solely because there were beings that have the capability and perform magical activities.

 

Lockyer, Roger. "Science and the Occult: The Discovery of Witchcraft: Who They Be That Are Called Witches." Shakespeare's World: Background Readings in the English Renaissance. By Gerald M. Pinciss. N.p.: Continuum International Group, 1989. 73-78. Web.EBSCOhost.com. 15 Jan. 2009. Web. 23 Feb. 2013.

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Article: THEATER; A Historic Whodunit: If Shakespeare Didn't, Who Did? - New York Times

Article: THEATER; A Historic Whodunit: If Shakespeare Didn't, Who Did? - New York Times | Nick Schmidt's Midsummer Night Dream | Scoop.it
IT was not the Bard of Stratford-on-Avon. It was Edward de Vere, the 17th Earl of Oxford.For Oxfordians, this is the answer to ''Who Wrote Shakespeare?''It is a position long argued, and one that
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This article provides evidence that the works that are known to be Shakespeare, may in fact not have been written by Shakespeare himself, but by someone else he associated with. There is a man called Oxford that many seem to believe has more evidence to have written the plays than the man we know as Shakespeare does. Whichever was the actual case, the plays were still written and remain some of the most respected and studied works of English literature. The validity of the author's true identity does not taint the quality or the educational value of the works by Shakespeare, whatever his true identity may be.

 

Niederkorn, William S. "THEATER; A Historic Whodunit: If Shakespeare Didn't, Who Did?"The New York Times. The New York Times, 10 Feb. 2002. Web. 14 Feb. 2013.

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Image: Henry Fuseli - Titania Awakes, Surrounded by Attendant Fairies

Image: Henry Fuseli - Titania Awakes, Surrounded by Attendant Fairies | Nick Schmidt's Midsummer Night Dream | Scoop.it
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The painting "Titania Awakes, Surrounded by Attendant Fairies" by Henry Fuseli depicts Titania the queen of the fairies as she wakes up next to the donkey-turned tradesman Bottom. The painting also shows Titania's fairy attendants as they watch over the two "lovers." The image does a great job of representing how completely infatuated the fairy queen is with Bottom. It is almost evident in the painting that she is under a spell and not genuinely wanting to sleep with the tradesman.

 

Fuseli, Henry. "Paintings." Http://favourite-paintings.blogspot.com. N.p., 25 Oct. 2011. Web. 23 Feb. 2013.

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Video: Mendelssohn Scherzo from A Midsummer Night's Dream Op.21 by Gergiev, MTO (2008)

Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy: Scherzo from A Midsummer Night's Dream Op.21 Mariinsky Theatre Orchestra Valery Gergiev, Conductor 10th Anniversary Concert Live...
Nicholas Schmidt's insight:

This selection from Felix Mendelssohn's "A Midsummer Night's Dream", is from first the first scherzo of the piece and foreshadows the events and the mood of the entire play. The busy melodies and countermelodies in a way represent the chaos that ensues in the play between the characters. The way it starts to build at around 1:24 and again at 1:40 emphasizes this chaos even more. I think this piece overall has a similar feel to the text of "A Midsummer Night's Dream" and would do the story justice in cooperation with the play.

 

YouTube. Perf. Mariinsky Theatre Orchestra, Valery Gergiev, Felix Mendelssohn.Mendelssohn Scherzo from A Midsummer Night's Dream Op.21 by Gergiev, MTO (2008). YouTube, 23 July 2011. Web. 14 Feb. 2013.

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Abby Boisvert's comment, March 9, 2013 12:41 PM
I agree with Marat. It was interesting that you incorporated something that you love with a school project. Good Job!
Kaley O'Connor's comment, March 10, 2013 1:50 PM
I also agree! I liked how you presented the video by saying that the music sounds like the magic and mischief of fairies in the forest, and then when we listened that is exactly what I pictured. ~Kaley
Nicholas Schmidt's comment, March 10, 2013 10:52 PM
I'm glad you guys agree! It immediately struck me as an interest just because it was music, and then when I listened to it, I could clearly picture A Midsummer Night's Dream.