NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development
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India watches anxiously as Chinese influence grows

India watches anxiously as Chinese influence grows | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
A $46bn economic corridor through disputed territories in Kashmir is causing most concern

Via Seth Dixon, Nevermore Sithole
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 6, 2016 1:13 PM

The Indian government doesn't want to seem threatened by the fact that China is paying for better transportation infrastructure that is essentially in their backyard.  India's neighbors are excited for the potential economic growth that this can bring, but weary of China's added clout and power throughout Asia.  As Parag Khanna argues is his new book Connectography, infrastructure and economic linkages will become increasingly more important to geopolitics and global economics; within that lens, China is certainly making a power move here. 

 

Tags: regions, transportationeconomic.

brielle blais's curator insight, April 1, 2:41 PM
Adding infrastructure to improve trade with other countries is a strong step taken by China. This new silk road showcases how important trade is to geopolitics. Other countries are watching as this unfolds, learning and wondering what will come of it, as China continues to make economic power moves for not only it's own country but the global economy as well. 
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Road from Europe to U.S.? Russia proposes superhighway

Road from Europe to U.S.? Russia proposes superhighway | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
London to New York City by car? It could happen if the head of Russian Railways has his way.

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Taylor Doonan's curator insight, March 15, 3:16 PM
A road from London to Alaska sounds crazy, but Russia is proposing it. A multi-national highway spanning from London through Europe, into Russia, across Siberia across the Bering Strait into Alaska. There are not many details yet, but Russia is proposing this highway, but there are a lot of hiccups in the way that need to get sorted out. 
Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, March 15, 3:42 PM
(Russia) In a world of globalization, this considered highway could make the world a little smaller. The Trans-Eurasian Belt Development project intends to create a road alongside the Trans-Siberian Railway, crossing all of Russia to link with roads spanning throughout Europe and connecting to North America through Alaska. The head of Russian Railways did not explain how the road would cross the Bering Strait. There are 55 miles between Russia and Alaska at the narrowest point, and one consecutive bridge would still be half the length of the longest bridge in the world. It is definitely doable. Linking to roads in Alaska and across the continent, a trip from London to New York could be about 12,910 miles, all by car. The road network would apparently pay for itself with weighty economic promise, however Russian Railways provided no information on this financial promise.

The highway would connect most of the world, but tense relations between Russia and the US and Europe could hinder progress. Additionally, the road would cost trillions of dollars, take a very long time, and require frequent maintenance, especially across seldom traveled regions in Siberia.
brielle blais's curator insight, March 29, 5:20 PM
This showcases how the geography of the world can be linked together to grow the economic stability of each country through easier access to products and goods. By creating the trans-siberean highway, Russia would be connected to the United States by their western coast. This allows access for places once very difficult to travel too. 
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This Is the Traffic Capital of the World

This Is the Traffic Capital of the World | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
There are only 650 major intersections here—but somehow only 60 traffic lights.

Via Seth Dixon
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Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:50 AM

Its amazing how much traffic can affect air pollution, especially in such a small place. Dhaka is heavily populated, traffic in this small but heavily populated community is very stressful, even to look at in the photo provided above. I can't imagine living in such a heavily populated area. I guess you can compare it to downtown New York City. However the pollution is more intense in Dhaka than it is in NYC.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 3:35 PM

This is a prime example of a megacity and the population that it cohabits the city. The huge populaiton that is se densley populated in such a small area creates for a large traffic and pedestrian issues. After watching the video you would think that there would be more accidents but living in a city like this you would get use to the population ways and learn the ways of life.

Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:28 AM

Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh, suffers from overpopulation. As funny and nerve-wrecking this video was, it shows an instability on how important technology is in order for safety. In the video we can see cars just passing by fast and furociuosly within centimeters of crashing in the car in front of it. There is no one guiding traffic and nonetheless, any stop and traffic lights on the streets. It is a free for all in the middle of the capital when it comes to driving and this is a lack of safety for the people in Bangladesh. It is almost impossible for people to cross the road without a high risk of getting driven over. We can also see how there are so many cars in the are was well. The region is very overpopulated and to think how worse it would be if everyone in the area owned a car. 

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North Dakota Town Evacuated Following Fiery Oil Train Derailment

North Dakota Town Evacuated Following Fiery Oil Train Derailment | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
The entire population of  Heimdal, North Dakota has been evacuated Wednesday morning after a train carrying crude oil derailed and exploded. A BNSF Railway oil train derailed around 7:30 am, setting at least 10 oil tanker cars on fire. The Bismarck Tribune spoke with emergency responders who "said the the sky was black with smoke near the derailment site."

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 6, 2015 4:55 PM

Many hoping to stop environmental degradation of Canada's Tar Sands and the Dakotas "Kuwait on the Prairie" have opposed the construction of the Keystone XL pipeline.  It's been decades since crude oil has been shipped by rail in the United States but fracking technologies have opened up areas without oil pipelines to become major producers.  As demonstrated in this NPR podcast, the railroad industry has seized on this vacuum and since 2009 has been supplying the oil industry the means to get their product to the market.  Trains, however, are not the safest way to transport oil, even if they are efficient in the short run.    


Tagstransportationpollution, industry, economic, energy, resources, environment, environment modify.

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Global Shipping Traffic Visualized

As stated in this NPR article: "The video shows satellite tracking of routes superimposed over Google Earth. It focuses on some of the main choke points for international shipping, such as the Strait of Malacca on the southern tip of Malaysia, Suez Canal, the Strait of Gibraltar and Panama Canal. It's a good reminder that about 90 percent of all the goods traded globally spend at least some of their transit time on a ship."


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, mapping, video, visualization.


Via Seth Dixon
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Mediterranean Cruise Advice's curator insight, February 25, 2015 6:46 AM

This is amazing to watch.

Matt Davidson's curator insight, February 26, 2015 4:52 AM

A great visual on shipping - Geographies of Interconnections (year 9)

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 10, 2015 6:24 PM

An important aspect of global trade links and connections. 

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This Is the Traffic Capital of the World

This Is the Traffic Capital of the World | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
There are only 650 major intersections here—but somehow only 60 traffic lights.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:50 AM

Its amazing how much traffic can affect air pollution, especially in such a small place. Dhaka is heavily populated, traffic in this small but heavily populated community is very stressful, even to look at in the photo provided above. I can't imagine living in such a heavily populated area. I guess you can compare it to downtown New York City. However the pollution is more intense in Dhaka than it is in NYC.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 3:35 PM

This is a prime example of a megacity and the population that it cohabits the city. The huge populaiton that is se densley populated in such a small area creates for a large traffic and pedestrian issues. After watching the video you would think that there would be more accidents but living in a city like this you would get use to the population ways and learn the ways of life.

Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:28 AM

Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh, suffers from overpopulation. As funny and nerve-wrecking this video was, it shows an instability on how important technology is in order for safety. In the video we can see cars just passing by fast and furociuosly within centimeters of crashing in the car in front of it. There is no one guiding traffic and nonetheless, any stop and traffic lights on the streets. It is a free for all in the middle of the capital when it comes to driving and this is a lack of safety for the people in Bangladesh. It is almost impossible for people to cross the road without a high risk of getting driven over. We can also see how there are so many cars in the are was well. The region is very overpopulated and to think how worse it would be if everyone in the area owned a car.