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Rescooped by Nevermore Sithole from Humanitarian Supply Chain & Logistics
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Dar es Salaam and Mombasa ports fight for Rwanda business

Dar es Salaam and Mombasa ports fight for Rwanda business | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

The port of Dar-es-Salaam in Tanzania may be just 1,380 kms from Kigali by road, but officials there have until now looked on helplessly as almost all Rwandan business slipped passed it to the Kenyan Port of Mombasa, a journey that is about 400kms longer through Uganda.

 

Slightly above 50% of Rwanda's shipments go through the Northern Corridor route; Mombasa-Kampala-Kigali, and the recent removal of police roadblocks, reduction in the number of weighbridges and improvements in cargo handling at Mombasa is making the route even more user friendly to Rwandan traders...

 

...A study done by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) in 2009 on impediments to trade in the region says that in Kenya and Tanzania, the average bribe paid per transaction to a policeman or a customs official is $30 while in Uganda it is between $100-150 per consignment.

Tanzania and Burundi were not part of the Kampala meeting, but Dar too seems to have woken up to the reality that trade barriers are counter-productive.


Via Robin Landis
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U.S.-Australia-India Public-Private Partnership Uses New Crop Technologies to Help Smallholder Farmers Adapt to Climate Change

U.S.-Australia-India Public-Private Partnership Uses New Crop Technologies to Help Smallholder Farmers Adapt to Climate Change | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

22 May 2013, USAID Press Release, Washington, D.C. -- "The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) is supporting a new public-private research partnership between the Australian Centre for Plant Functional Genomics (ACPFG) and India-based Vibha Agrotech to develop new climate-resilient varieties of rice and wheat, two of the “big three” primary crops required to feed the world.  The program is part of Feed the Future, the U.S. Government’s global hunger and food security initiative, and it leverages resources from both the public and private sector in Australia and the private sector in India. ...

 

This new collaboration will leverage ACPFG’s unique gene technologies and considerable expertise in cereal stress tolerance and Vibha’s field evaluation and rice transformation capabilities to develop new rice and wheat varieties with enhanced tolerance to drought and salinity, allowing farmers more stable production in the face of sudden drought and evolving salt water intrusion. The new lines will be evaluated under representative field conditions and the most successful will be transferred into the varieties that farmers grow.  Work will initially take place in Australia and India, but the technologies will be made available to developing countries in South Asia and globally where climate stresses impact cereal yields, so that farmers can be more confident that they will have a good harvest, even as climate change creates more unpredictable growing environments."

 


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Harvest, Meet Market: How a New Fund Will Accelerate Agricultural Infrastructure in Africa | USAID Impact

Harvest, Meet Market: How a New Fund Will Accelerate Agricultural Infrastructure in Africa | USAID Impact | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

10 May 2013 -- Tjada McKenna, Deputy Coordinator for Development for Feed the Future blog piece, USAID Impact

 

USAID's Feed the Future, the African Development Bank (AFDB) and the government of Sweden joined together to create Agriculture Fast Track.  This encourages private sector investment in food security projects in Sub-Saharan Africa. 

 

"The Agriculture Fast Track will encourage private sector investment in agricultural infrastructure projects to advance food security in Sub-Saharan Africa. In doing so, it supports Africa’s agriculture transformation agenda.

 

Incentivizing investment in agriculture

 

Historically, the private sector hesitated to invest in agriculture in Africa—and for good business reasons. Investing in agriculture has inherent risks, including drought, crop and livestock diseases and fluctuating crop prices. Agriculture projects can have high start-up costs because systems and facilities must be developed before they can begin making a profit. Given these challenges, it can be difficult for African countries and their development partners to create lasting improvements in food security.

 

That’s why we are so excited about renewed efforts to tackle these challenges in order to catalyze private investment that can spur economic growth while reducing hunger and undernutrition. Following the lead of African nations, efforts like the New Alliance for Food Security and Nutrition have coupled tough regulatory policy reforms with private investment commitments in agriculture. African leadership has driven these efforts forward, with governments undertaking transparent market-oriented reforms that encourage private investment and reduce barriers to agriculture-led economic growth."


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Building Resilience to Recurrent Crisis: USAID Policy and Program Guidance

Building Resilience to Recurrent Crisis: USAID Policy and Program Guidance | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Administrator Rajiv Shah announced the launch of the Agency’s first-ever policy and program guidance on Building Resilience to Recurrent Crisis during an event in Washington DC.

 

USAID seeks to achieve specific results to build resilience for vulnerable populations: increased adaptive capacity; improved ability to address and reduce risk as well as mitigate and recover from shocks and stresses; and improved social and economic conditions. Over the long-term, USAID intends for these efforts to collectively contribute to reduced humanitarian need.


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Challenges facing archivists: The Missions of AID, Part II

Challenges facing archivists: The Missions of AID, Part II | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

http://t.co/8HesgYnF ;

 

Alan Walker, a processing archivist in Research Services, about the challenges facing an archivist dealing with accessions:

 

"Earlier I described to you the Overseas Mission records of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and our project to transform them from the unfortunate and inaccessible state in which they arrived at Archives II.

These records have proven a time-consuming challenge for three reasons: 1.) the disarray and lack of documentation for the accessions; 2.) the large quantity of temporary records found in the accessions; and 3.) the physical condition of the records and their containers.

We process the records for one mission at a time. This involves surveying the contents of each accession for that mission. Very few of these accessions arrived with any sort of documentation as to which offices within the missions created them. Add to this the fact that you will frequently find records of many different offices in a single box. Oh, and did I mention that you will find a bit of records for one office in one box, and then in another accession you’ll find more records for that office? These then need to be arranged and consolidated back into their original order. Two such missions, those for Guatemala and India, have proven particularly monstrous in terms of the sheer volume and disarray of their records."


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Feed the Future | U.S. Agency for International Development

Feed the Future | U.S. Agency for International Development | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it
USAID is advancing global food security by helping to improve the most basic of human conditions: the need that families and individuals have for a reliable source of quality food and sufficient resources to purchase it.

Via Anna V. A. Resurreccion
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Anna V. A. Resurreccion's curator insight, May 27, 2013 1:08 AM

The article states:

Almost 1 billion people across the globe go to bed hungry every night. To meet the needs of a world population expected to reach 9 billion by 2050, agricultural production will need to increase by 70 percent.

 

The statistics are staggering. It is almost too late to do something to prevent food insecurity, we must act now to minimize food insecurity in the near future.      

 

FoodieDoc, Anna Resurreccion, Ph.D., CFS

Fellow of the Instuitute of Food Technologists

 

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USAID Launches its First Global Water Strategy

USAID Launches its First Global Water Strategy | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

24 May 2013, Christian Holmes, USAID Global Water Coordinator, USAID Impact Blog -- "This week, USAID Administrator Rajiv Shah, along with Senator Richard Durbin, Senator Chris Coons, Representative Earl Blumenauer and Representative Ted Poe, launched the first USAID global water strategy in the Agency’s history. Under Secretary of State Robert Hormats represented the State Department.  Lisa Nash, CEO of Blue Planet Network and Gemma Bulos, Founder, A Single Drop for Safe Water (ASDSW) and the contemporary Christian band Jars of  Clay also participated.

 

I began at USAID almost four decades ago working on international disaster assistance efforts, meeting water, health and food needs in the Sahel. While our planet’s needs for sustainable supplies of water and food have increased, so has our capacity to meet these needs. It’s a privilege to be part of the team that developed – and will now help implement –a water strategy that will do much to meet water, health and food needs for decades to come.

 

The goal of the USAID Water and Development Strategy is to save lives and improve development in a world where practically 800 million people are without adequate water and 2.5 billion people are without access to adequate sanitation. The strategy sets out two overarching objectives: improve global health and strengthen global food security through USAID-supported water programs.  Here are four projects which represent the kinds of activities we expect to be supported by the strategy:Hygiene Improvement Project (HIP) – Ethiopia;Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Enterprise Development (WaterSHED)Lower Mekong;Water and Development Alliance (WADA) – Senegal; Indonesia Urban Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (IUWASH)"


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USAID Integrates Humanitarian, Development Aid for Resilience

USAID Integrates Humanitarian, Development Aid for Resilience | NGOs in Human Rights, Peace and Development | Scoop.it

Oxfam has called the new USAID guidance on building resilience to recurrent crises "a breakthrough" in linking short-term humanitarian responses with longer-term development programming. "The new USAID guidance comes at a critical juncture when the world is looking more deeply than ever at how to assist people and their societies withstand and recover from a growing number of natural disasters."

 

The need to build resilience in the Horn of Africa was highlighted when African leaders meeting in September 2011 in Nairobi, Kenya, called for a new way to address recurrent crisis in the region due to drought and conflict. Those events affected some 13 million people in Somalia, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Kenya and Uganda, according to the UN World Food Programme.

 

In response, in April 2012 USAID and African and international development partners met in Nairobi to establish the Global Alliance for Action for Drought Resilience and Growth in the Horn of Africa. In June, USAID convened the group's first meeting in Geneva.

 

The following month, the European Union led the founding of the Global Alliance for Resilience in the Sahel that will work closely with the Global Alliance for Action for Drought Resilience and Growth in the Horn of Africa.

 

"Through building resilience, we can help prevent that desperation, save lives, and create the conditions where families and communities can prosper." [Rajiv Shah, USAID Administrator]


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Rescooped by Nevermore Sithole from Food & Nutrition Security in East Africa
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Policy Brief | East Africa "Feed the Future"

This is a good overview by Heather Cruise.

 

"The USAID East African Regional Feed the Future program is a multi-year development strategy addressing food security throughout the region including Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Rwanda, Ethiopia, Malawi, Zambia, S. Sudan, and DR Congo. In this region agriculture accounts for nearly 30% of the GDP and employs more than 60% of the population. However, even when there is a surplus of food in the region, countries still face food crises. Thus, the movement of staple foods from surplus to deficit areas by means of regional trade could help countries and sub-areas take advantage of crop diversity and various harvest periods, minimizing risk of local food shortages. Regional integration allows for market expansion and enhanced efficiency. This results in an increase in competition and improves policies that align with development agendas.

 

A key strategy of the Feed the Future program is to facilitate the integration of regional markets in East Africa to enhance trade flows of staple foods in the region and scale up production technologies thereby increasing consumer access, availability, and utilization. Structured regional markets around corridors combined with lowered transit costs will spur economic growth and structural change resulting in improved food security and nutrition in the region..."


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