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Sugar beet info

Sugar beet info | Newsletter title | Scoop.it

The root of the beet contains 75% water, about 20% sugar and 5% pulp [6] (the exact sugar contents can vary between 12 and 21% of sugar, depending on the cultivar and growing conditions). Sugar is the primary value of sugar beet as a cash crop. The pulp, insoluble in water and mainly composed of cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, and pectin, is used in animal feed. The byproducts of the sugar beet crop, such as pulp and molasses, add another 10% to the value of the harvest.[5]

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It has lots water.

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Wikipedia sugar beets

Wikipedia sugar beets | Newsletter title | Scoop.it

The methodical use of sugar beets for the extraction of sugar dates to 1747, when Andreas Sigismund Marggraf, professor of physics in the Academy of Science of Berlin, discovered the existence of a sugar in beets similar in its properties to that obtained from sugarcane.[9] The discovery was little used at first, however, and the manufacture of sugar from beets did not attain commercial importance for over half a century. Marggraf's student and successor Franz Karl Achard began selectively breeding sugar beet from the 'White Silesian' fodder beet in 1784. By the beginning of the 19th century, his beet was approximately 5–6% sucrose by (dry) weight, compared to around 20% in modern varieties. Under the patronage of Frederick William III of Prussia, he opened the world's first beet sugar factoryin 1801, at Cunern in Silesia.

 

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Bull puckey

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