News: Changing Organisations
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Lean Change Management at SDEC 13

During this presentation I challenged the notion that "agile fails due to resistance or failure to change culture".

Via Alexis Assimacopoulos
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The New Economics of Innovation Ecosystems - from Stanford Social Innovation Review

The New Economics of Innovation Ecosystems - from Stanford Social Innovation Review | News: Changing Organisations | Scoop.it
Anew strain of economic thought is emerging to explain how societies can grow sustainably. It’s not just coming from the public, which has already expressed discontent with the status quo through demonstrations worldwide. And it’s not just coming from business leaders, such as Richard Branson, who co-founded a group called the B Team to reset the values of corporate management. In their own quiet way, academic researchers in the field of innovation have also engaged this issue... via Ron Donaldson @rondon
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HP Announces Leadership Changes to Drive Ongoing Turnaround

HP today announced changes to its executive leadership team that will help the company accelerate its turnaround.


Via Alexis Assimacopoulos
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Iliad turns to profit and sells wholesale unit to York Timber for R45.5m - Business News | IOL Business | IOL.co.za

Iliad turns to profit and sells wholesale unit to York Timber for R45.5m - Business News | IOL Business | IOL.co.za | News: Changing Organisations | Scoop.it
Iliad Africa has sold its timber wholesale business to York Timber for R45.5 million and achieved a turnaround to profit in the year to last December. This follows a rationalising and rebranding of some stores and the rationalisation of its retail subdivision . Eugene Beneke, the chief executive of the listed building materials supplier, said yesterday that the decision to sell the firm’s timber wholesale business followed the ongoing review and optimisation of its portfolio. He said the sale price was the net asset value of the business and the proceeds of the transactions would be used to fund working capital requirements and future growth. The deal includes Timber Wholesale’s Thorpe Timber in Germiston, a maker and wholesale distributor of timber, and Timber Preservation Services in Cape Town, which operates a timber value adding, treating and wholesale distribution business. The transaction is subject to the approval of the competition authorities. Yesterday Iliad reported a significant improvement in earnings a share to 24.3c in the year to December from a loss of R1.749 in the previous year. The company did not incur any restructuring costs or impairments in the reporting period compared with R52.5m in once-off restructuring costs and R249.5m in impairments related to its Thorpe Timber and National Tile Traders businesses in the previous year.
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How important is the exchange rate?

How important is the exchange rate? | News: Changing Organisations | Scoop.it

Should exchange rate stability be part of central banks’ responsibility with regard to macro-prudential regulation, asks economist Jac Laubscher.

 

Cape Town - The recent sharp deterioration in the rand exchange rate, the first since the heightened focus on financial stability in the wake of the global financial crisis, has given rise to the question of whether exchange rate movements should be taken into account in the pursuit of financial stability.

More specifically: Should exchange rate stability be part of central banks’ responsibility with regard to macro-prudential regulation?

The global financial crisis inevitably resulted in a radical review of the regulation and supervision of the financial system.

Part of this was the realisation that focusing only on individual financial institutions is not enough, but that the stability of the system as a whole is even more important as it is vital for the ongoing provision of financial intermediation services to the economy.

The result was a formal distinction between micro-prudential regulation, which relates to individual institutions, and macro-prudential regulation, which in turn focuses on the system as a whole.

The latter includes the continuous monitoring of macroeconomic and financial trends in order to identify risks to financial stability in good time and take preventative measures.

The objective of macro-prudential regulation is to address systemic risk in the financial system with a view to protecting the real economy against the consequences of financial instability.

This instability could arise from a sharp curtailment of credit extension, which would disrupt real economic activity (a credit crunch) and could even result in a recession and/or a sell-off of financial assets (a fire sale) that would cause asset prices to decline sharply, with similar negative consequences for the real economy. History shows that house prices in particular are key to stability in the banking system."

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The Dance of Change | by Sophia Kruger

The Dance of Change |  by Sophia Kruger | News: Changing Organisations | Scoop.it

A different lens on Facilitating Organisational Change

 

"The only way to make sense of change is to plunge into it, move with it, and join the dance." - (Alan Watts)

 

This article follows on the work of Lucille Greeff and her series on Facilitating Organisational Change (i).

 

For the purpose of this paper, I would like to introduce the metaphor of Change Management as a Dance Performance. 

 

The various changes introduced in organisations can be seen as similar to dance productions and such productions would follow one or many of the dance disciplines i.e. Paso Doble, Cha-Cha, Viennese Waltz or a Ballet. 

The individuals responsible for orchestrating and driving change are the producers and/or choreographers.  The performers are the targets of change and those affected by the change. 

 

The tools we use to enable change are like the genre of music that will allow for the best possible expression of the dance discipline.

When we view change in this way, we can begin to understand that each genre of music has an appropriate dance style that allows the dancer to give expression to both the music and the art of the dance being performed.

 

Naturally the level of skill of the producer, choreographer and the artists, the ability to choose the correct genre of music, together with natural skills, knowledge, ability and experience makes for a good or a bad performance..."

 

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David Hain's curator insight, July 2, 2013 9:02 AM

Interesting food for thought in this analogy.

WorldsView Academy's comment, July 2, 2013 10:07 AM
Thank you David. When you hear Sophia speak about her facilitation in the two organisations from her case study, you can hear that she never forces change; she works with the people in the organisation through those subtle and intricate movements that she refers to as 'dance'.
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Africa: Power Sector is Ready for 'Stampede' of Investment - General Electric

Africa: Power Sector is Ready for 'Stampede' of Investment - General Electric | News: Changing Organisations | Scoop.it

Last year, GE and the Federal Government of Nigeria signed three Memorandum of Understanding agreements (MOUs) outlining cooperation in the energy, healthcare and rail transportation sectors. Ground-breaking for a U.S.$250 million manufacturing facility in the port city of Calabar took place two weeks ago. Lazarus Angbazo, President and CEO of GE Nigeria, discussed the company's growth strategy in an interview with Reed Kramer in Abuja last month. Excerpts:allAfrica: African news and information for a global audience

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Daily Maverick - Analysis: First power from Medupi by end 2013? Unlikely.

Daily Maverick - Analysis: First power from Medupi by end 2013? Unlikely. | News: Changing Organisations | Scoop.it

"Despite repeated assurances by Public Enterprises Minister Malusi Gigaba and Eskom CEO Brian Dames, it is becoming increasingly unlikely that power from Medupi, South Africa’s first new base-load power station in 25 years, will be delivered into the national grid by the end of 2013. By CHRIS YELLAND.

 

Already more than two years late on Medupi, Eskom has blamed the absence of a funding plan, geological conditions, its major contractors Hitachi and Alstom, labour unrest by the construction site workforce and even its former construction execution partner, Parsons Brinckerhoff Power – but never itself – for the construction delays at the 4,800MW coal-fired dry-cooled power station.


The bottom line, however, is that Medupi should have had 2,400MW of commercial power on stream by now and the base-load power capacity shortage resulting from the delays is throttling economic growth in South Africa and weakening the currency..."

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Half-Days, Heidegger and Health | Alexis Assimacopoulos

Half-Days, Heidegger and Health | Alexis Assimacopoulos | News: Changing Organisations | Scoop.it

"Issue-Centricity, the organisation as a "World" and "Physical Health" within the Organisation Development paradigm

In the 20th century, Martin Heidegger sought to better understand the ontological makeup of EVERYTHING. To this end he categorised the world into four distinct groups: physical objects, organisms, human beings, and "work". The final field was used to describe something born of inspiration, like an art "work". More than 300 years later, Organisation Development (OD) seems to be coming towards a similar ontological conclusion, thanks to the ground breaking work of Dominik Heil and Rob Farrands in developing the organisation as a "world"..."

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WorldsView Academy's curator insight, June 18, 2013 3:35 AM

Aiden Choles wrote: 

"Really sharp article Alexis.

Until now the notion of health has been unchallenged in my mind when it comes to the organisation. If we assume health is important, relevant and needed, what does that say about our ontology of the organisation? Important line of questioning for sure, but I wonder if having a health focus in OD has been unhelpful? If so, on what basis?

As I read your article I wondered about what the next evolution of this would be? Dominik's application of ontological work towards ethical management stands out. If not 'healthy' organisations, then what about 'good' organisations? Effective organisations in a good way, maybe?..."

 

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One-size-fits-all plan unlikely to pass constitutional muster

One-size-fits-all plan unlikely to pass constitutional muster | News: Changing Organisations | Scoop.it

"IS THE African National Congress’s (ANC’s) policy on the public service constitutional? Moves are afoot at Luthuli House and in Parliament to introduce legislation aimed at creating a centrally controlled one-size-fits-all public service for South Africa. Interested parties have been given the impossibly short deadline of June 28 to comment on a bill that has been published to resuscitate an idea first mooted several years ago and then quietly dropped when criticism surfaced.

 

The old thinking survives, tucked away in regulatory powers envisaged for the minister of public service and administration, currently Lindiwe Sisulu..."

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Change Management Strategy for SAP Implementation

Change Management Strategy for SAP Implementation | News: Changing Organisations | Scoop.it

Customers' demands and expectations are constantly changing.


Via Alexis Assimacopoulos
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Creating a Culture Change with Visual Management

Creating a Culture Change with Visual Management | News: Changing Organisations | Scoop.it

Have you heard the old maxim “What gets measured gets done”? Management expert Peter Drucker said it, and here, Bill Donaldson shows us how a smart manager uses visual management to apply measurement to change what gets done.


Via Alexis Assimacopoulos
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Worldsview Academy for Organisational change | Re-thinking Resistance to Change, by Dave Evans

Worldsview Academy for Organisational change | Re-thinking Resistance to Change, by Dave Evans | News: Changing Organisations | Scoop.it

Hunger for change has been described as the most important attribute an organisation can have today, in an era where rapid change is so prevalent and pervasive – in technology, in organisations and in the world generally. And yet, the percentage of change interventions which fail is variously given as between 50% and 80%. Although ‘Resistance to Change’ has become a cliché, it is surprisingly difficult to find a common definition of what it is, even though everyone thinks they understand it. So: what is it?

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Five myths of organisational change - why ‘change management’ can stop you achieving organisational change -

Five myths of organisational change - why ‘change management’ can stop you achieving organisational change - | News: Changing Organisations | Scoop.it

We are constantly told that, in today’s world, change is a permanent feature of organisational life. Given this is it surprising how many myths abound, and the extent to which organisations struggle with the concept of change!

Sarah Lewis, chartered psychologist and author of ‘Appreciative Inquiry for Change Management’ believes that part of the problem is that our ideas in this area are outdated. The organisation is not a machine and our leaders are not all seeing and all knowing.

In Sarah’s experience, working within both large and small organisations, there are five erroneous beliefs that mean that ‘change management’ can actually hinder change within an organisation:

 

You can’t implement the change until you have thought through every step and have every possible question answered

Not True. In many situations it is sufficient to have a sense of the end goal along with some shared guiding principles about how the change will unfold...

 

You can control communication within the organisation about  change

Impossible! People are sense-making creatures who constantly work to make sense of what is happening around them. This means it is not possible to control communication in this way...

 

To communicate about change is to engage people with the change

Not necessarily. People start to engage with the change when they start working out what it means for them. They find out through exploration and discovery...

 

Planning makes things happen

Sadly no! Creating plans can be an extremely helpful activity but until people translate the plans into activity on the ground, the plans are just plans...

 

Change is always disliked and resisted

No. If this were true none of us would emerge from babyhood. Our life is a story of change and growth, of expansion and adaptation, of discovery and adjustment...


Via Virtual Global Coaching, David Hain
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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, June 28, 2013 7:32 PM

Helpful myth busting and change planning.  ~ Deb

Vinny Smith's curator insight, July 25, 2013 7:05 AM

Pragmatic and realistic honesty about how change really happens in organisations.

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SAP Commits to Driving Skills Development and Job Creation in Africa

SAP Commits to Driving Skills Development and Job Creation in Africa | News: Changing Organisations | Scoop.it

Coinciding with Co-CEO Jim Hagemann Snabe’s visit to Johannesburg, SAP AG today announced the launch of a formal skills development program in SAP Africa. The “Skills for Africa” program is aimed at developing information and communications technology (ICT) skills in Africa as part of SAP’s global mission to help the world run better and improve people’s lives. SAP’s social investment strategy is focused on promoting education and entrepreneurship.

SAP AG today announced the launch of a formal skills development program in SAP Africa (image: file)

With growth and the scarcity of skills on the African continent top of mind, this program — a first of its kind in the industry in Africa — will offer selected students across the continent the opportunity to develop world-class IT and business skills, effectively giving them an opportunity to play a role in contributing toward Africa’s future economic growth and infrastructure development.

This program represents the African chapter of SAP’s “EMEA Workforce of the Future” campaign, focused on examining European, Middle Eastern and African (EMEA) trends, needs and opportunities vital to the successful recruitment, retention and training of the technology industry’s workforce of the future. In support of this effort, several other activities are underway across Europe, most notably the Academy Cube project, which helps students in the EU prepare for “Industry 4.0,” the fourth industrial revolution where products will soon be expected to be able to communicate and act autonomously with one another in intelligently networked production processes.

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Call for ‘Codesa’ accord to get SA’s infrastructure plan back on track

Call for ‘Codesa’ accord to get SA’s infrastructure plan back on track | News: Changing Organisations | Scoop.it

KETSO Gordhan, CEO of PPC, South Africa’s largest cement producer, on Monday called for the government and private sector to hold talks at a new "Codesa" to get the country’s stalled infrastructure building programme back on track.

Mr Gordhan, who is influential in both government and industry circles, said a Codesa would be a "critical step to kick-start implementation of much-needed infrastructure development in South Africa".

"It is clear that infrastructure bottlenecks by both the public and private sectors need to be addressed, not through agreeing to generic accords but rather through implementable plans with clear roles, responsibilities and deadlines," he said.

The Codesa model is often touted as a practical forum to bring together stakeholders in negotiations, after the success of the initial Convention for a Democratic South Africa convened in Kempton Park in December 1991, ahead of the multiparty talks that led to the country’s transition from apartheid to democracy in 1994.

Since last year, the government has repeatedly committed itself to spending billions on new infrastructure, as the centrepiece of its economic growth efforts. The plan has been to spend about R1-trillion on infrastructure from last year to 2020.

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Amcu, Motlanthe on collision course

Amcu, Motlanthe on collision course | News: Changing Organisations | Scoop.it

DEPUTY President Kgalema Motlanthe and the Association of Mineworkers and Construction Union (Amcu) are on a collision course that may further derail South Africa’s precarious mining output and the economy in general.

Following the burst in unprotected strikes and violence in the platinum mining sector in 2012, President Jacob Zuma put Mr Motlanthe in charge of a commission to negotiate for peace and stability in the sector.

It involves players from business, organised labour and the government, and an accord is already on the table.

Lives are at stake. In August, the police shot and killed 34 workers at Lonmin’s Marikana operation, and more than a dozen people have been killed or injured as the union turf war rages.

The economy of the country is at stake too. Wages have been rising and productivity falling in the sector. Investors have begun to shy away.
In its June 2013 monetary policy review, the Reserve Bank said that it might revise its growth forecast of 2.4% downward at the next meeting due to the worse than expected data releases.

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Daily Maverick - Eastern Cape's Mthatha problem

Daily Maverick - Eastern Cape's Mthatha problem | News: Changing Organisations | Scoop.it

"In a damning report to be released at the SA Aids Conference today, civil society groups describe what happens when the drug supply chain goes wrong. As the Mthatha medical depot in the Eastern Cape remains dysfunctional, over 100,000 people are affected, with many unable to access life-saving medication. Still, the province doesn’t believe there’s a problem. By GREG NICOLSON.

 

The crisis hit in September 2012. The national transport strike meant deliveries to the depot slowed before the centre’s staff also went on strike. The centre serves over 300 medical facilities and affects over 100,000 people. When MSF and TAC went to investigate, they found no staff to unload deliveries at the depot, no one to capture orders from medical facilities and no one pack the orders for delivery. Few employees returned from the bitter wildcat strike. Service delivery had collapsed, causing interruptions in patients’ antiretroviral (ARV) and other treatments. With interruptions comes the risk of developing resistance to the drugs..."

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How a small factory in Port Elizabeth conquered the world

How a small factory in Port Elizabeth conquered the world | News: Changing Organisations | Scoop.it

"By investing in the Eastern Cape, mechanisation and making astute acquisitions, Aspen’s CEO has built up an R80bn company, writes Ray Hartley...

 

The odds are stacked against the Eastern Cape. Years of government neglect have resulted in schools collapsing, the public health system plumbing the depths and roads deteriorating. None of this deterred Stephen Saad, CEO and a co-founder of the Aspen group, from creating a globallycompetitive business...

 

In his experience, workers, “if treated properly and managed properly”, can radically improve their productivity.

“There are plenty of ways of improving productivity other than asking people to work harder — improved mechanisation, improved processes. Engineers need to be thinking and then you need to manage the whole chain to improve productivity,” says Mr Saad.

 

But Mr Saad does not dwell on risks. He has shown how, even in one of South Africa’s most economically depressed regions, it is possible to build a world-class manufacturing business that creates jobs. He expects his staff to work hard and constantly improve productivity. But, he said, there must be a balance between work, family and relaxation."

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WorldsView Academy's curator insight, June 18, 2013 6:31 AM

Mr Saad's balanced approach to productivity is inspiring!