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Emotional Intelligence Needs a Rewrite - Issue 51: Limits - Nautilus

Emotional Intelligence Needs a Rewrite - Issue 51: Limits - Nautilus | News | Scoop.it
You’ve probably met people who are experts at mastering their emotions and understanding the emotions of others. When all hell breaks loose, somehow these individuals remain calm. They know what to say and do when their boss is moody or their lover is upset. It’s no wonder that emotional intelligence was heralded as the next big thing in business success, potentially more important than IQ, when Daniel Goleman’s bestselling book, Emotional Intelligence, arrived in 1995. After all, whom would you rather work with—someone who can identify and respond to your feelings, or someone who has no clue? Whom would you rather date?

The traditional foundation of emotional intelligence rests on two common-sense assumptions. The first is that it’s possible to detect the emotions of other people accurately. That is, the human face and body are said to broadcast happiness, sadness, anger, fear, and other emotions, and if you observe closely enough, you can read these emotions like words on a page. The second assumption is that emotions are automatically triggered by events in the world, and you can learn to control them through rationality. This idea is one of the most cherished beliefs in Western civilization. For example, in many legal systems, there’s a distinction between a crime of passion, where your emotions allegedly hijacked your good sense, and a premeditated crime that involved rational planning. In economics, nearly every popular model of investor behavior separates emotion and cognition.

These two core assumptions are strongly appealing and match our daily experiences. Nevertheless, neither one stands up to scientific scrutiny in the age of neuroscience. Copious research, from my lab and others, shows that faces and bodies alone do not communicate any specific emotion in any consistent manner. In addition, we now know that the brain doesn’t have separate processes for emotion and cognition, and therefore one cannot control the other. If these statements defy your common sense, I’m right there with you. But our experiences of emotion, no matter how compelling, don’t reflect the biology of what’s happening inside us. Our traditional understanding and practice of emotional intelligence badly needs a tuneup.

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Bobbi Dunham's curator insight, August 14, 2017 11:02 AM
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Dorothy R. Cook 's curator insight, December 30, 2017 3:20 AM

Emotional games were played even back in the Bible days, oh boy got tricked and treated worse than the lowest of low, Inslaved, picked at, tortured, beaten, sight taken and no strength at all to one point but he had not lost his connection with God and on the low low God restored him a new as his only desire was to take all of them that had done that to him out but rest assured God knew his heart and intent was right but in order to make it happen he asked God to let that be his last request of prayer. God to be for sure answered his prayer by restoring his strength but he kept it all as a secret as muc h as on boy loved to talk to the ladies but God restored all that the just when they all gathered and had the nerve to unchain oh boy as he requested so he could lean upon a certain pedistal that he knew because his strength was renued but they didn't know it and he had SK God to forgive him restore him and vindicate him by giving him his one last prayer of request and let him take them out and he was doing to go with them to make it happen because he wanted it as an atonement for his own sins, weaknesses but look at God he made the emotional games played by others straight they got treated by their own tricks and was so busy looking at what they saw because they did It by working oh boy emotional weakness a d him not knowing who was behind the game so he played to , that they failed to see that God had restored oh boy and answered his last prayer, but not every prayer is a last prayer but God still answers just the same. 

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Keeping Data: What and How I Plan to Keep Track | Knowledge Quest

Keeping Data: What and How I Plan to Keep Track | Knowledge Quest | News | Scoop.it
Every year I enjoy looking at the year-end reports that people share. I always find it interesting what and how people represent their library. However, I often think, “Man, I wish I would have thought to keep track of that... Read More ›

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How to Show Empathy Without Ruining Your Mental Health

How to Show Empathy Without Ruining Your Mental Health | News | Scoop.it
“We found that people who engaged in empathy for a suffering other by focusing on that person’s feelings experienced less stress than people who engaged in empathy by imagining themselves in the other person’s situation,” coauthor Michael Poulin, a psychology professor at the University of Buffalo, told Fatherly.

 

Poulin and colleagues identified two types of empathy — IOPT (imagine-other perspective taking) and ISPT (imagine-self perspective taking). The key difference between the two lies in how vividly you imagine the other person’s plight. IOPT is engaging in empathy simply by thinking about how another person feels. “If my son has a bad dream,” Poulin explains “I can reasonably assume that he is scared and needs to be comforted.”

 

ISPT, however, is engaging in empathy by mentally thrusting yourself into a troubling situation. “To return to the example of my son having a bad dream,” Poulin says. “I could imagine how I would feel if I had a bad dream, or I could even think back to a time when I did.

 

JOSHUA A. KRISCH
MAY 12, 2017

 


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New Study Shows How Tylenol Can Totally Change How You Feel About People

New Study Shows How Tylenol Can Totally Change How You Feel About People | News | Scoop.it
In psychology, there’s a concept known as complementary projection in which people assume that others feel and think the same way they do. This can help bring people together, but it also makes it easy to misinterpret the thoughts and feelings of others. A new study shows that when people take the pain reliever acetaminophen—the active ingredient in Tylenol—it causes them to believe others are pain free as well. 

Researchers at The Ohio State University conducted a study involving 114 college students who were exposed to loud blasts of white noise. Participants who took 100 milligrams of acetaminophen rated the noise as less unpleasant than those who hadn’t—and they also assumed the noise was less unpleasant for everyone who heard it. These results were replicated in another study in which participants read about people who’ve endured extreme physical and psychological pain. Those under the influence of acetaminophen consistently rated the perceived pain as less unpleasant than those who hadn’t taken any.

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Twitter's Given their Apps a Major Overhaul - Here's What's Been Updated

Twitter's Given their Apps a Major Overhaul - Here's What's Been Updated | News | Scoop.it
Twitter has unveiled a re-design of their apps, including several functional changes.
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The Difference Between Empaths and Highly Sensitive People

The Difference Between Empaths and Highly Sensitive People | News | Scoop.it
As a psychiatrist and an empath, I often get asked, What is the difference between empaths and highly sensitive people? In “The Empath’s Survival Guide” I devote a section on this important distinction.

Here are the similarities and areas of overlap. Empaths share all the traits of what Dr. Elaine Aron has called “Highly Sensitive People,” or HSPs. These include a low threshold for stimulation, the need for alone time, sensitivity to light, sound, and smell, plus an aversion to large groups. It also takes highly sensitive people longer to wind down after a busy day since their system’s ability to transition from high stimulation to being quiet is slower. Highly sensitive people are typically introverts whereas empaths can be introverts or extroverts, (though most are introverts). Empaths share a highly sensitive person’s love of nature, quiet environments, desire to help others, and a rich inner life.

 

Judith Orloff
 Author, 'The Empath's Survival Guide: Life Strategies for Sensitive People'


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New Research Shows Empathy in HSP's Brains

New Research Shows Empathy in HSP's Brains | News | Scoop.it

As highly sensitive people, many of us have spent our lives feeling different from other people but not really knowing why. In some cases, others tell us that we’re different, usually in a critical, demanding way – you’re too sensitive, too intense, too shy, why are you hiding out here when everyone else is at the party?

 

These all too familiar phrases, even when they are well-meant, usually have the effect of making sensitive people feel unacceptable, unappreciated and inherently flawed in some way, leading us quickly down the road to feelings of shame, self-doubt and low self-esteem.

 

Deborah Ward is the author of Overcoming Low Self-Esteem with Mindfulness.


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Physicists Make the Case That Our Brains' Learning Is Controlled by Entropy

Physicists Make the Case That Our Brains' Learning Is Controlled by Entropy | News | Scoop.it
The way our brains learn new information has puzzled scientists for decades - we come across so much new information daily, how do our brains store what's important, and forget the rest more efficiently than any computer we've built?

It turns out that this could be controlled by the same laws that govern the formation of the stars and the evolution of the Universe, because a team of physicists has shown that, at the neuronal level, the learning process could ultimately be limited by the laws of thermodynamics.

"The greatest significance of our work is that we bring the second law of thermodynamics to the analysis of neural networks," lead researcher Sebastian Goldt from the University of Stuttgart in Germany told Lisa Zyga from Phys.org.

The second law of thermodynamics is one of the most famous physics laws we have, and it states that the total entropy of an isolated system always increases over time.

Entropy is a thermodynamic quantity that's often referred to as a measure of disorder in a system. What that means is that, without extra energy being put into a system, transformations can't be reversed - things are going to get progressively more disordered, because it's more efficient that way.

Entropy is currently the leading hypothesis for why the arrow of time only ever marches forwards. The second law of thermodynamics says that you can't un-crack an egg, because it would lower the Universe's entropy, and for that reason, there will always be a future and a past.

But what does this have to do with the way our brains learn? Just like the bonding of atoms and the arrangement of gas particles in stars, our brains are designed to find the most efficient way to organise themselves.

"The second law is a very powerful statement about which transformations are possible - and learning is just a transformation of a neural network at the expense of energy," Goldt explained to Zyga.

If you keep in mind the fact that learning in its most simplistic form is controlled by billions of neurons firing inside our brains, then finding patterns in that energy output becomes a little easier.

To model how this works, Goldt and his team set up a neural network - a computer system that models the activity of neurons in the human brain.

"Virtually every organism gathers information about its noisy environment and builds models from those data, mostly using neural networks," the team writes in Physical Review Letters.

What the researchers were looking for is how neurons filter out the noise, and only respond to impor

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5 Trends That Will Change How You Use Social Media in 2015

5 Trends That Will Change How You Use Social Media in 2015 | News | Scoop.it
Big changes are afoot for the likes of Twitter, Facebook and others.

This year started with a death sentence for Facebook. In January, a research company called Global Web Index published a study showing that Facebook had lost nearly one-third of its U.S. teen users in the last year. Headlines pronounced the network “dead and buried.”

Fast forward to the present and Facebook is reporting record growth. The company earned $2.96 billion in ad revenue in the third quarter of 2013, up 64 percent from just a year ago. More impressively, the network has added more than 100 million monthly active users in the last year.

All of which goes to show how difficult it can be to predict the future of social media. With that caveat in mind, here’s a look into the crystal ball at five ways social media will (likely) evolve in 2015.

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4 Ideas For Motivating Adolescent Male Readers

4 Ideas For Motivating Adolescent Male Readers | News | Scoop.it

It’s no secret that state and national assessments continue to indicate that boys lag behind girls in the area of reading.

 

The gap tends to grow larger as students enter adolescence. It’s also no secret that many teenage boys dislike reading — in class or at home. Just ask a high school teacher…or a teenage boy. While it’s not true that all teenage boys dislike reading, there is a growing trend of many becoming unmotivated readers. Obviously, students who are resistant to reading are unlikely to get better at it. Here are four ideas for motivating adolescent male readers.


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Are Selfies and Smartphones the New Comfort Food?

Are Selfies and Smartphones the New Comfort Food? | News | Scoop.it
How Millennials satisfy the "empty self"

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Don Dea's curator insight, November 23, 2014 3:53 AM

What gives the ‘empty self’ special relevance today is research about the Millennials consumer segment which suggests that this concept may be influencing their attitudes. While post-World War II cultural change influenced consumer behavior during the last half of the twentieth century; a continuation of this change may be influencing the behavior of the young consumer segment associated with the twenty-first century.

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Universities' Challenge

Universities' Challenge | News | Scoop.it

For the first time, the annual number of British students choose to go to university in the US is more than 10,000. What’s behind this trend? The breadth of courses in the US and tuition fees in Britain.


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It Takes a Community to Educate a Student - Huffington Post

It Takes a Community to Educate a Student - Huffington Post | News | Scoop.it
Experiences outside of the classroom are often as meaningful as those inside the classroom. The academic professionals on your campuses are integral to the success and well-being of your students....

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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, November 25, 2014 10:45 AM

It does. Unfortunately, too many Schools are not communities. Communities are organic and come with dysfunctions that have to be talked through and listened through.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Greenland: how rapid climate change on world's largest island will affect us all

Greenland: how rapid climate change on world's largest island will affect us all | News | Scoop.it
The largest wildfire ever recorded in Greenland was recently spotted close to the west coast town of Sisimiut, not far from Disko Island where I research retreating glaciers. The fire has captured public and scientific interest not just because its size and location came as a surprise, but also because it is yet another signpost of deep environmental change in the Arctic.

Greenland is an important cog in the global climate system. The ice sheet which covers 80% of the island reflects so much of the sun’s energy back into space that it moderates temperatures through what is known as the “albedo effect”. And since it occupies a strategic position in the North Atlantic, its meltwater tempers ocean circulation patterns.


Most of Greenland is covered by more than a kilometre of ice. Eric Gaba / NGDC, CC BY-SA
But Greenland is especially vulnerable to climate change, as Arctic air temperatures are currently rising at twice the global average rate. Environmental conditions are frequently setting new records: “the warmest”, “the wettest”, “the driest”.

Despite its size, the fire itself represents only a snapshot of Greenland’s fire history. It alone cannot tell us about wider Arctic climate change.

But when we superimpose these extraordinary events onto longer-term environmental records, we can see important trends emerging.

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David Stapleton's curator insight, August 21, 2017 8:55 PM
Be aware of your surroundings
Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, August 22, 2017 10:14 AM

More proof of #ClimateChange increase.

Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, August 22, 2017 10:16 AM

More proof of a rapid increase of #Climage Change

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Even Just Seeing Your Phone Nearby Can Mess With Your Brain Power

Even Just Seeing Your Phone Nearby Can Mess With Your Brain Power | News | Scoop.it
Just being near your smartphone can be enough to reduce your brain power, even when it's switched off, according to a new study – so you might want to give yourself and your mobile some alone time in the future.

The research shows the way our smartphones have become a constant source of distraction, whether or not we're actually using them, and could lead to a better understanding of the dangers of being always connected and available.

According to the team from the University of Texas at Austin, the study demonstrates how having phones within sight or within easy reach means some of our brainpower is inevitably used up as we try not to be distracted.

"We see a linear trend that suggests that as the smartphone becomes more noticeable, participants' available cognitive capacity decreases," says one of the researchers, Adrian Ward.

"Your conscious mind isn't thinking about your smartphone, but that process – the process of requiring yourself to not think about something – uses up some of your limited cognitive resources. It's a brain drain."

Those conclusions were reached after two experiments. In the first, 520 smartphone users were told to turn their phones to silent then either leave them in another room, place them face down on a desk, or put them in a pocket or a bag.

The volunteers were then asked to complete a series of computer tests that required serious concentration to score highly.

The participants who left their phones in another room "significantly outperformed" those with their phones on the desk, and "slightly outperformed" those with their phones in a pocket or a bag, report the researchers.

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50 Top Motivational Quotes to Inspire You to Achieve Your Goals

Maybe you want to start a business. Maybe you want to change careers. Maybe you want to get fit, or gain a new path, or in some way take your life in a new direction.

To do that, sometimes all you need is a little push, a little nudge. A little burst of motivation and inspiration.

Here are fifty of those nudges.

Pick the one that makes your skin tingle, your heart race, your motor rev, and place it somewhere you'll see it every day: your monitor, your screen saver, your background, and let it help take you to the place you've always wanted to go.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, April 30, 2017 8:58 PM

Actions spring from thoughts -- the right thoughts.

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, May 15, 2017 7:36 PM
I love good quotes. Yoda and Lao Tzu on the same list made it for me.
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Antarctica Is Turning Green, as Climate Change Pushes It Back in Geologic Time

Antarctica Is Turning Green, as Climate Change Pushes It Back in Geologic Time | News | Scoop.it
Researchers in Antarctica have discovered rapidly growing banks of mosses on the ice continent's northern peninsula, providing striking evidence of climate change in the coldest and most remote parts of the planet.

Amid the warming of the last 50 years, the scientists found two different species of mosses undergoing the equivalent of growth spurts, with mosses that once grew less than a millimetre per year now growing over 3 millimetres per year on average.

"People will think of Antarctica quite rightly as a very icy place, but our work shows that parts of it are green, and are likely to be getting greener," said Matthew Amesbury, a researcher with the University of Exeter in the UK, and lead author of the new study.

"Even these relatively remote ecosystems, that people might think are relatively untouched by human kind, are showing the effects of human induced climate change."

The study was published Thursday in Current Biology, by Amesbury and colleagues with the University of Cambridge, the British Antarctic Survey and the University of Durham.

Less than 1 percent of present-day Antarctica features plant life. But in parts of the peninsula, Antarctic mosses grow on frozen ground that partly thaws in the summer - when only about the first foot of soil ever thaws.

The surface mosses build up a thin layer in the summer, then freeze over in winter. As layer builds on top of layer, older mosses subside below the frozen ground, where they are remarkably well preserved due to the temperatures.

Amesbury said that made them "a record of changes over time".

Soil samples from a 400-mile (640-km) area along the northern part of the Antarctic peninsula found dramatic changes in growth patterns going back 150 years.

The Antarctic peninsula has been a site of rapid warming, with more days a year where temperatures rise above freezing. The consequence, the study found, was a four- to five-fold increase in the amount of moss growth in the most recent part of the record.

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Engineers and Ethicists Must Work Together on Brain-Computer Interface Technology

Engineers and Ethicists Must Work Together on Brain-Computer Interface Technology | News | Scoop.it
In the 1995 film “Batman Forever,” the Riddler used 3-D television to secretly access viewers’ most personal thoughts in his hunt for Batman’s true identity. By 2011, the metrics company Nielsen had acquired Neurofocus and had created a “consumer neuroscience” division that uses integrated conscious and unconscious data to track customer decision-making habits. What was once a nefarious scheme in a Hollywood blockbuster seems poised to become a reality.

Recent announcements by Elon Musk and Facebook about brain-computer interface (BCI) technology are just the latest headlines in an ongoing science-fiction-becomes-reality story.

BCIs use brain signals to control objects in the outside world. They’re a potentially world-changing innovation – imagine being paralyzed but able to “reach” for something with a prosthetic arm just by thinking about it. But the revolutionary technology also raises concerns. Here at the University of Washington’s Center for Sensorimotor Neural Engineering (CSNE) we and our colleagues are researching BCI technology – and a crucial part of that includes working on issues such as neuroethics and neural security. Ethicists and engineers are working together to understand and quantify risks and develop ways to protect the public now.

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cometmardy's comment, June 20, 2017 3:29 AM
nice
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Scientists Just Changed The Game And Made Synthetic Photosynthesis Possible

Scientists Just Changed The Game And Made Synthetic Photosynthesis Possible | News | Scoop.it
Photosynthesis is one of nature's most efficient phenomena: aside from providing much of the oxygen human beings need to breathe, this naturally occurring process gives plants the food and energy they need to survive.

It uses visible light - which the Earth has an abundance of - to provide the 'fuel' they need. Researchers have been working on ways to artificially recreate this natural process in labs, in the hopes of producing fuel, too - specifically methane.

Now, a team of chemists from the Brookhaven National Laboratory and Virginia Tech have designed two supramolecules, each made up of a number of light-harvesting ruthenium (Ru) metal ions attached to a single catalytic centre of rhodium (Rh) metal ions.

"By building supramolecules with multiple light absorbers that may work independently, we are increasing the probability of using each electron productively," Gerald Manbeck, lead author of the study published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, said in a press release.

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uaewebsitedevelopment's curator insight, June 10, 2017 5:50 AM
Web Development Company in dubai
Ettienne's curator insight, November 4, 2017 4:44 PM
Exxon Mobile love this one...
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It's Official: Time Crystals Are a New State of Matter, and Now We Can Create Them

It's Official: Time Crystals Are a New State of Matter, and Now We Can Create Them | News | Scoop.it
Earlier this year, physicists had put together a blueprint for how to make and measure time crystals - a bizarre state of matter with an atomic structure that repeats not just in space, but in time, allowing them to maintain constant oscillation without energy.

Two separate research teams managed to create what looked an awful lot like time crystals back in January, and now both experiments have successfully passed peer-review for the first time, putting the 'impossible' phenomenon squarely in the realm of reality.

"We've taken these theoretical ideas that we've been poking around for the last couple of years and actually built it in the laboratory," says one of the researchers, Andrew Potter from Texas University at Austin.

"Hopefully, this is just the first example of these, with many more to come."

Time crystals are one of the coolest things physics has dished up in recent months, because they point to a whole new world of 'non-equilibrium' phases that are entirely different from anything scientists have studied in the past.

For decades, we've been studying matter, such as metals and insulators, that's defined as being 'in equilibrium' - a state where all the atoms in a material have the same amount of heat.

Now it looks like time crystals are the first example of the hypothesised but unstudied 'non-equilibrium' state of matter, and they could revolutionise how we store and transfer information via quantum systems.

"It shows that the richness of the phases of matter is even broader [than we thought]," physicist Norman Yao from the University of California, Berkeley, who published the blueprint in January, told Gizmodo.

"One of the holy grails in physics is understanding what types of matter can exist in nature. [N]on-equilibrium phases represent a new avenue different from all the things we've studied in the past."

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2014 Black Friday & Cyber Monday Driving Social Conversations

2014 Black Friday & Cyber Monday Driving Social Conversations | News | Scoop.it
Black Friday’s importance for retail success might be waning — what with the National Retail Federation announcing an 11% drop in sales compared to 2013 — but the conversation on social media has never been stronger.

Black Friday 2014 was the most social ever, according to social media analytics firm Spredfast, driving more than 2 million Twitter conversations in the seven-day lead up to the day. That’s more than twice the number from 2013, Spredfast said. And though Cyber Monday is still with us, preliminary Spredfast data indicates that it’s also driving record Twitter interaction, with 340,000 conversations in the seven-day period, a 75% increase over 2013, as of noon Eastern time today

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How to Better Remember and Make Use of What You Read

How to Better Remember and Make Use of What You Read | News | Scoop.it
A blog about productivity, workflow automation, company building and how to get things done with less work.

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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, November 27, 2014 6:30 PM

The author provides some excellent points about writing and using recent read material.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Kids whose time is less structured are better able to meet their own goals

Kids whose time is less structured are better able to meet their own goals | News | Scoop.it
Children who spend more time in less structured activities—from playing outside to reading books to visiting the zoo—are better able to set their own goals and take actions to meet those goals without prodding from adults, according to a new study by the University of Colorado Boulder.

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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, November 29, 2014 6:50 PM

In School, allowing students to share in the decision making that goes on in the classroom helps achieve this end.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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5 Things I Learned This Term About Teaching Information Literacy

5 Things I Learned This Term About Teaching Information Literacy | News | Scoop.it
This was my first full term as a full-time, academic, faculty teaching librarian. I entered the profession as a public educator - well, technically, para-educator, or instructional assistant. And I...

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9 Myths About Social Media at Work

9 Myths About Social Media at Work | News | Scoop.it
Avinash Kaushik, an Indian entrepreneur, author and public speaker, once tweeted that “Social media is like teen sex, Everyone wants to do it. No one actually knows how. When finally…

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