The NewSpace Daily
207.1K views | +4 today
Follow
The NewSpace Daily
NewSpace: A New Era In Space Exploration. As one era ends a new one begins: a new golden era in spaceflight. Join us for all the latest headlines in this bold new adventure.
Curated by Stratocumulus
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

NASA's moon landing remembered today as a promise of a 'future which never happened' | SpaceRef

NASA's footage of the first moon landing promised a future of sci-fi heroism that never came to pass, according to a new study.

 

The paper, by Professor Steve Brown and Professor Martin Parker, of the University of Leicester's School of Management, and Dr Lewis Goodings, of the University of Roehampton, is published in the International Journal of Management Concepts and Philosophy.

 

The first moon landing is overwhelmingly remembered as an exciting and important turning point in world history, which continues to inspire space exploration projects to Mars and beyond today.

 

However, the new study shows how NASA used images of the 1969 Apollo 11 moon landing to develop a narrative of its own importance for the future.

 

 

Stratocumulus's insight:

"As for the gunfighter walk down the gantry…
These were mostly test pilots
They knew the odds
Two years before Apollo 11, the crew of Apollo 1 had made the same walk, and had burned to death.
Yet still these men took those steps.
And that was not image, but courage."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Spacex reusable rockets and Bigelow Aerospace inflatable stations

Spacex reusable rockets and Bigelow Aerospace inflatable stations | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Bigelow Aerospace inflatable space stations needs low cost launches that are human rated.

Spacex could have a reusable first stage as early as 2014, but Bigelow needs human rated launch capability. The larger modules need Spacex Heavy launch capabilities which could be proved in 2014 as well. Human rated Spacex launches might take until 2016-2019.

Bigelow has stated on multiple occasions that he is prepared to fund Bigelow Aerospace with about US$500 million through 2015 in order to achieve launch of full-scale hardware.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

3D-Printed rocket successfully designed, built and test by UC San Diego students

3D-Printed rocket successfully designed, built and test by UC San Diego students | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

A group of students forming the UC San Diego chapter of the organization known as Students for the Exploration and Development of Space represented the Jacobs School of Engineering when they conducted a hot fire test for a 3D-printed metal rocket engine that they, themselves designed. The rocket engine, aptly named Tri-D, was tested at the Friends of Amateur Rocketry launch site in the Mojave Desert on the morning of Saturday, October 5th.

 

“It was a resounding success and could be the next step in the development of cheaper propulsion systems and a commercializing of space,” said President Deepak Atyam.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

SES communications satellite in Florida for Falcon 9 launch | Spaceflight Now

SES communications satellite in Florida for Falcon 9 launch | Spaceflight Now | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

A communications satellite booked for the next launch of the Falcon 9 rocket was transported by truck from Virginia to Florida this week as SpaceX seeks to allay the worries of the payload's owner - the global commercial operator SES - and the insurance community after the Falcon 9's test flight Sunday encountered a second stage engine restart anomaly.

 

The SES 8 satellite was shipped from its factory at Orbital Sciences Corp. in Dulles, Va., to a processing facility near Cape Canaveral, Fla., where engineers will put the craft through final preflight testing and fuel it with maneuvering propellant.

 

SES 8 is slated to be the payload for SpaceX's next Falcon 9 launch, which is scheduled for no earlier than Nov. 1. But the launch depends on the outcome of an inquiry into the cause of a problem with the second ignition of the Falcon 9's upper stage on Sunday's launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Houston, We Have a Market: Privatizing Space Launches Pays Off Big

Houston, We Have a Market: Privatizing Space Launches Pays Off Big | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

The normally spectacular NASA website went black this week and the space agency tweeted, “Sorry, but we won’t be tweeting/responding to replies during the government shutdown. Be back as soon as possible.” The future can apparently be put on hold if it is government run.

 

In fact, the media noise surrounding the looming shutdown overshadowed an important space milestone that occurred on Sunday, the nearly simultaneous liftoff of a Falcon 9 rocket and the docking of a Cygnus capsule with the International Space Station. What was most significant is that NASA wasn’t the designer, builder, or operator of either of these spacecraft. Both were designed and launched by private firms operating in what is now a competitive space launch market, and we can get all the details at the still functioning websites of SpaceX and Orbital Sciences.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Musk lays out plans for reusability of the Falcon 9 rocket | NASASpaceFlight.com

Musk lays out plans for reusability of the Falcon 9 rocket | NASASpaceFlight.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

SpaceX CEO and Chief Designer Elon Musk has laid out his plans for recovery and reusability of the first stage of the Falcon 9. The debut mission to launch the Cassiope satellite into orbit included a number of events that should help SpaceX recover and possibly even reuse the first stage of the Falcon 9 in 2014.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Schlieren photographs | XCOR Aerospace blog

Schlieren photographs | XCOR Aerospace blog | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Above is an image of of the Lynx supersonic wind tunnel model being photographed using the ‘schlieren’ technique. You may have seen this photo in a press release after some of our earlier supersonic wind tunnel tests.

‘But what is schlieren?’ you ask.

As it turns out, schlieren photography is the brain child of German physicist August Toepler, who in 1864 developed the technique to analyze and understand supersonic motion. “Schlieren” in German means “streaks.” As is visible in the image above, shock waves appear as streaks across the image emanating from the edges of the model. These streaks reveal changes in air density around our wind tunnel model, and this helps to determine where geometry changes will be needed for improved aerodynamic performance in a given environment.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Orbital Gets NASA OK for Commercial Cargo Delivery Flight | Parabolic Arc

Orbital Gets NASA OK for Commercial Cargo Delivery Flight | Parabolic Arc | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

International Space Station (ISS) astronauts opened the hatch to the newly arrived Cygnus freighter on Monday and began unloading cargo as NASA officials gave Orbital Sciences Corporation permission to proceed with a commercial cargo delivery flight in two month’s time.

 

“They are good to go,” said Alan Lindenmoyer, program manager for NASA’s Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) program. “The station has a spot ready for them in December. We’re getting the cargo ready to ship out. They’ve demonstrated a system that certainly can deliver. There will be no delays in proceeding toward the next mission.”

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

As Next Customer on Falcon 9 Manifest, SES Awaits Details on Sept. 29 Flight | SpaceNews.com

As Next Customer on Falcon 9 Manifest, SES Awaits Details on Sept. 29 Flight | SpaceNews.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

PARIS — Satellite fleet operator SES will await a detailed briefing from SpaceX on why SpaceX’s new-version Falcon 9 failed to perform a planned reignition of its upper stage — crucial for deployment of the SES-8 satellite awaiting a Falcon 9 launch — during its Sept. 29 demonstration flight, SES spokesman Yves Feltes said Oct. 2.

 

In an interview, Feltes said Luxembourg-based SES nonetheless still expects SES-8 to be the payload on the next Falcon 9 launch. The mission, scheduled to take place in the coming weeks, will be the Falcon 9’s first to geostationary transfer orbit, the dropoff point for most telecommunications craft.

 

Among the new features to be proved during the maiden flight of the Falcon 9 v1.1 rocket was the ability of its upper stage to perform a second ignition. While it was not needed for the Sept. 29 mission, which deployed multiple satellites to low Earth orbit, it is a necessary feature for launches into geostationary transfer orbit.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

DANDE Satellite Off to a Good Start | Parabolic Arc

DANDE Satellite Off to a Good Start | Parabolic Arc | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

BOULDER, Colo. (CU-Boulder PR) – A small satellite designed and built by a team of University of Colorado Boulder students to better understand how atmospheric drag can affect satellite orbits was successfully launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California Sunday morning.

 

The satellite, known as the Drag and Atmospheric Neutral Density Explorer satellite, or DANDE, will investigate how a layer of Earth’s atmosphere known as the thermosphere varies in density at altitudes from about 200 to 300 miles above Earth. The commercial Falcon-9 SpaceX rocket lifted off the launch pad at about 10 a.m. MDT carrying DANDE, a small beach ball-sized satellite developed over a period of about six years by roughly 150 students, primarily undergraduates, as part of the Colorado Space Grant Consortium, or COSGS.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

SpaceX Falcon 9 From Vandenberg AFB Near Perfect

Launch team comments on their first West Coast SpaceX Falcon 9, which lifted the Cascade Smallsat & Ionospheric Polar Explorer [CASSIOPE] from Vandenberg Air Force Base's Space Launch Complex-4 in a crucial test of vehicle and military crew.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Swans and Falcons

Swans and Falcons | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

THE idea behind private spaceflight is simple: the spur of competition should enable private firms to develop cheaper, more reliable rockets than a costly state-run enterprise such as NASA could ever hope to manage. Last year SpaceX, a firm founded by the PayPal entrepreneur Elon Musk, made history when its Dragon spacecraft became the first privately built and operated vehicle to dock with the International Space Station (ISS). Earlier this year, another Dragon fulfilled the first stage of SpaceX's 12-mission, $1.6 billion contract to haul cargo to the station.

 

Now the firm, hitherto something of a monopolist in the private space business, at last has a true competitor, in the shape of another private-spaceflight veteran: the Virginia-based Orbital Sciences. On September 29th Orbital's Cygnus spacecraft, with hundreds of kilograms of supplies on board, was grabbed by the ISS's robotic arm and guided to a docking berth. The capsule had been in orbit since September 18th, but a previous docking attempt on September 22nd had been aborted because of software problems. This time, though, things went smoothly, leaving the firm well placed to begin fulfilling its own $1.9 billion cargo-resupply contract.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

SpaceX knocks down claim that Falcon 9 rocket exploded in orbit | NBC News.com

SpaceX knocks down claim that Falcon 9 rocket exploded in orbit | NBC News.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

The SpaceX launch company and its billionaire founder, Elon Musk, on Tuesday smacked down suggestions that the upper stage of its upgraded Falcon 9 rocket exploded after putting a half-dozen satellites

in orbit.

 

"There was definitely no explosion of any kind." Musk told NBC News in an email. "Falcon 9 released all satellites safely in their intended orbits."

 

The suggestions were sparked by radar readings passed along by Space-Track.org, a database that monitors orbital objects ranging from satellites to space junk. SpaceX's Falcon 9 v1.1 rocket was launched for the first time from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on Sunday, and released the Canadian space-weather satellite called Cassiope as well as five smaller payloads into pole-to-pole orbits.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Gerry Griffin proposes a giant leap for all humankind

Gerry Griffin proposes a giant leap for all humankind | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Gerry Griffin, former Director of the NASA’s Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, was in in Houston Thursday to explain his new role as Chairman of the Board of the Golden Spike Company (GSC). Forty (40) years after Apollo, GSC believes now is the time to return humans to the moon. The technology is ready and the price is affordable.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Want to build a satellite but dont have a NASA sized budget?

PocketQubes are tiny satellites which are small enough to fit in your Pocket. They are 5cm cubes and you can stack them up to create larger satellites, for example 1.5 PocketQubes or 1.5p and 2.5p. Why go small? They are cheapest fully functional class of satellite to launch.

 

The standard was proposed by Professor Bob Twiggs, creator of the revolutionary Cubesat form factor and voted as one of 10 space professionals "That made a Difference in Space."

 

At the end of November the first 4 PocketQubes will be launched into Orbit from Russia! There will be more going next year.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

XCOR Crew: Geoffrey Licciardello, Test Engineer | XCOR Aerospace blog

XCOR Crew: Geoffrey Licciardello, Test Engineer | XCOR Aerospace blog | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

Every few weeks we break from  technical posts and run a set of short interviews on the people behind Lynx. We want to make sure you hear the story of both Lynx development and those who are Lynx, the people who design and build it every day.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Analysis: NASA’s New Role as Partner

Analysis: NASA’s New Role as Partner | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

NASA has radically scaled back, but space travel survives. How? In the face of fiscal constraints, the agency has changed its role. For the United States, space exploration is evolving from a government-led venture to a rich collaboration with the private sector.

 

As NASA has reduced its commitments, a dynamic private sector space ecosystem has sprung up vigorously into the void, and with the agency’s strong support. Richard Branson’s Virgin Galactic, for example, is developing a spacecraft to launch tourists into orbit and facilitate at least $4.5 million in NASA research contracts, prompting New Mexico to build a $209 million spaceport. Blue Origin, led by Amazon.com founder and chief executive Jeff Bezos, is developing space vehicles designed to launch and land on retractable legs. A startup called NanoRacks helps scientists who need zero-gravity environments transport their experiments to the International Space Station.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Golden Spike and Human Lunar Expeditions: For All Mankind

Golden Spike and Human Lunar Expeditions:  For All Mankind | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

"In 1975 after the demise of the Apollo program, Jack Schmidt and Leon Silver hosted the Fairchild Conference at Caltech. Asking what went wrong; Neil Armstrong suggested that big government decisions in the USA are often a response to a perceived threat. However, to make something happen, bold leadership, resources and public support are also required. If any of these drivers are out of sync, big government efforts are unsustainable. In our current financial crisis, resources are extremely limited. NASA is no longer able to mount major programs. The old economic model that had centrally planned effort and massive government funding as the driver for space exploration has failed. Perhaps Golden Spike can help the Aerospace Industry return to the entrepreneurial style seen in the 1930’s as aviation was emerging."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

SpaceX Customer Ships Satellite Despite Insurers’ Ongoing Concerns | SpaceNews.com

SpaceX Customer Ships Satellite Despite Insurers’ Ongoing Concerns | SpaceNews.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

PARIS — Satellite fleet operator SES has authorized the shipment of its SES-8 satellite to Florida to prepare for the first fully commercial launch of a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket despite the ongoing concerns of insurance officials that the Falcon 9 v1.1’s Sept. 29 demonstration flight did not meet the stated objectives.

 

Luxembourg-based SES has said it is awaiting more data from SpaceX about why the Falcon 9 upper-stage engine did not complete a second ignition during the Sept. 29 mission. Doing so will be necessary for most commercial telecommunications satellites intended to operate in geostationary orbit.

 

But in a demonstration of how much it wants Hawthorne, Calif.-based Space Exploration Technologies Corp. (SpaceX) to establish itself in the commercial launch market, SES on Oct. 2 authorized satellite builder Orbital Sciences to pack SES-8 into a container and bring it to Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., by truck.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Space Junk Cleanup Satellite Launching on Swiss Space Plane in 2018

Space Junk Cleanup Satellite Launching on Swiss Space Plane in 2018 | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

A Switzerland-based spaceflight company is finalizing plans with Canada over a potential launch site for a new private space plane, which is slated to launch a satellite to clean up space junk by 2018.

 

The company, Swiss Space Systems (S3), plans to launch the new Clean Space One satellite using the European Suborbital Reusable Shuttle, a small space plane the firm is developing for low-cost launches off the back of a modified Airbus A300 jumbo jet.

 

CleanSpace One is a 66-pound (30 kilograms) technology demonstration spacecraft designed to link up with Switzerland's out-of-commission SwissCube nanosatellite — a small cube that measures 3.93 inches (10 centimeters) on each side — and safely de-orbit the target craft. The mission aims to demonstrate orbital identification and rendezvous with an uncooperative target and has an estimated cost of about 15 million Swiss Francs ($16 million).

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

SES-8 heads to Florida for next Falcon 9 v1.1 launch | NASASpaceFlight.com

SES-8 heads to Florida for next Falcon 9 v1.1 launch | NASASpaceFlight.com | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

The Orbital-built SES-8 telecommunications satellite has begun its road journey to Florida ahead of its November 1 (NET) launch atop of SpaceX’s Falcon 9 v1.1 launch vehicle. The satellite is rolling to the Cape Canaveral area on the back of a truck, ahead of processing and integration with the upgraded F9 that is preparing for its debut launch out of Florida.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

What happened with the Falcon 9′s second stage? | NewSpace Journal

While the inaugural launch of the Falcon 9 v1.1 on Sunday appeared to be successful, placing the CASSIOPE satellite and several secondary payloads into low Earth orbit, there has been some chatter over the last two days about what happened to the rocket’s second stage after it released its payloads, including speculation—now refuted by the company—that the stage exploded.

 

SpaceX did not in the post-launch press conference that the company had planned to relight the second stage’s single Merlin engine after deployment, but encountered a problem. “We initiated a relight and the system encountered an anomaly and did not complete the relight,” SpaceX CEO Elon Musk said in a post-launch teleconference Sunday afternoon. “We believe we understand what that issue is and should have it addressed in time for the next flight of the Falcon 9.” He said he wanted to give the company more time to investigate the issue before discussing exactly what happened. “It’s nothing fundamental.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Your Journey To Space Starts Here October 2013

 

The latest version of Virgin Galactic's 'Your Journey To Space Starts Here' - October 2013

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Super Sunday for Commercial Spaceflight

"Over the last year, the company has been flight testing an experimental vehicle at its test facility in rural Texas. Designated “Grasshopper,” it is a variant on a Falcon 9 first stage, with landing legs. It’s teaching SpaceX how to not just launch a vehicle vertically, but to land it as well, and the test program seems to have been going well. The goal is to eventually return the first stage of an operational Falcon 9 (and later, when it flies, the three cores of the Falcon Heavy) to the launch site, and reuse them."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stratocumulus
Scoop.it!

Upper Stage of New Falcon 9 Rocket Did Not Explode After Launch, SpaceX Says

Upper Stage of New Falcon 9 Rocket Did Not Explode After Launch, SpaceX Says | The NewSpace Daily | Scoop.it

WASHINGTON — Space Exploration Technologies Corp. (SpaceX) issued a statement Oct. 1 denying speculation that the upper stage of its Falcon 9 v1.1 rocket exploded on orbit following the rocket’s successful demonstration launch Sept. 29 from the Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.

 

The speculation was spawned in part by the fact that the U.S. Space Surveillance Network is currently tracking more orbital objects associated with the launch than expected.

 

In its maiden launch, the Falcon 9 v1.1 carried the Canadian Space Agency’s Cassiope space weather satellite and three secondary payloads to low-Earth orbit. The launch was a trial for the upgraded rocket — the Falcon 9 v1.1 features a stretched fuel tank, new engines and a 5.2-meter-diameter fairing — that SpaceX now hopes to use to launch commercial communications satellites to geostationary orbit.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.