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Study shows social media echo chambers might actually be a good thing

Study shows social media echo chambers might actually be a good thing | new society | Scoop.it
Early sharing economy enthusiasts had a clear vision for the peer-to-peer marketplace: path towards sustainability, empowerment of individuals, and new job opportunities for the disadvantaged. However, the sharing economy’s giants such as Uber and Airbnb quickly overtook the marketplace, painting a vastly different picture.

While they provide convenience and efficiency, there’s a price to pay: low wages and job insecurity. As a result, we’ve seen a number of workers across the globe take it to the streets to voice their dissatisfaction with unfair work practices.

And these workers are not just talking the talk; they’ve also started walking it. A number of them united to start or join platform cooperatives — platforms owned and governed by the workers, users, or both. While these platforms aim to reinvent Uber and Airbnb by using cooperative principles, they are struggling to get on the radar of consumers. But blockchain is coming to the rescue.

It’s promising to make trust, reputation, and coordination possible without the need for centralized authority. So I wonder, how would the sharing economy world look if it was run by the users, for the users?
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Would universal basic income sap the workforce?

Would universal basic income sap the workforce? | new society | Scoop.it
Would universal basic income cause people to leave the workforce? New research suggests it would not.

Such proposals, including one that Hillary Clinton considered during her 2016 presidential campaign, include direct payments that ensure each resident has a baseline of income to provide for basic needs. While previous research has focused on the effects of these unconditional cash transfers at the micro level—for example, winning the lottery—this study examined their large-scale impact by looking a government program that has supported Alaska residents for the past 25 years.

In a working paper, associate professor Damon Jones of the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy and assistant professor Ioana Marinescu of the University of Pennsylvania School of Social Policy and Practice (formerly of the University of Chicago) examined the effect of unconditional cash transfers on labor markets using the Alaska Permanent Fund Dividend—a payout from a diversified portfolio of invested oil reserve royalties, established in 1982.

They concluded unconditional cash transfers had no significant effect on employment, yet it increased part-time work.

“It is reasonable to expect an unconditional cash transfer, such as a universal income, to decrease employment,” Jones says. “A key concern with a universal basic income is that it could discourage people from working, but our research shows that the possible reductions in employment seem to be offset by increases in spending that in turn increase the demand for more workers.”

With only a few exceptions, every Alaskan who has been a resident for at least 12 months is entitled to a dividend from the Alaska Permanent Fund, which as of August 2017 is worth nearly $61 billion. In recent years, the payment, which residents receive through direct deposit, has averaged about $2,000 a year in a lump sum. But because it is a per-person amount, a household of four could receive more than $8,000.

Jones and Marinescu examined the effects of a large number of people receiving a cash transfer. Notably the researchers found that:

There is no significant effect, positive or negative, on employment as a whole, although part-time work does increase by 1.8 percentage points, or about 17 percent.
There is a difference in the effect of the unconditional cash transfer in sectors that produce goods or services that can be traded outside of Alaska and those that cannot. Part-time work increases and employment decreases in the tradable sector, but the effects in the non-tradable sector are insignificant.
Any negative effects in the non-tradable sector, meanwhile, are offset by positive macro effects.

Via Wildcat2030
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10 Ways the Information Landscape Changed in 2017 – Victoria McIntosh – Medium

May you live in interesting times: for many, 2017 was a long twelve months. No doubt many newscasters have had their hand full picking out the most significant stories of the year: between a newly elected president in the United States, an investigation on international election interference, terrorist attacks, devastating hurricanes, North Korea upping the nuclear ante and the damn bursting open on previous silence of sexual harassment within Hollywood and beyond, 2017 was many things, but never dull. In the fields of information science, data law and privacy, the year past was far from quiet, seeing more consequences of mismanagement and attempts to control information even as it flows through more channels than ever.

In no particular order, here are ten ways the information landscape changed in 2017:

1) Fake News 

2) China’s New Cyber Security Law Is in Force 

3) FCC Changes the Course of Information in the United States 

4) Equifax Hack 

5) Highs and Lows of Apple 

6) Uber Upsets 

7) Yes Virginia, in Canada Your Texts Are Private 

8) WannaCry

9) Border Wars: Privacy When Traveling 

10) Bitcoin and Blockchain’s Growing Prominence.

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How Automation Will Change Work, Purpose, and Meaning

How Automation Will Change Work, Purpose, and Meaning | new society | Scoop.it
The vast majority of humans throughout history worked because they had to. Many found comfort, value, and meaning in their efforts, but some defined work as a necessity to be avoided if possible. For centuries, elites in societies from Europe to Asia aspired to absolution from gainful employment. Aristotle defined a “man in freedom” as the pinnacle of human existence, an individual freed of any concern for the necessities of life and with nearly complete personal agency. (Tellingly, he did not define wealthy merchants as free to the extent that their minds were pre-occupied with acquisition.)

The promise of AI and automation raises new questions about the role of work in our lives. Most of us will remain focused for decades to come on activities of physical or financial production, but as technology provides services and goods at ever-lower cost, human beings will be compelled to discover new roles — roles that aren’t necessarily tied to how we conceive of work today.

Part of the challenge, as economist Brian Arthur recently proposed, “will not be an economic one but a political one.” How are the spoils of technology to be distributed? Arthur points to today’s political turmoil in the U.S. and Europe as partly a result of the chasms between elites and the rest of society. Later this century, societies will discover how to distribute the productive benefits of technology for two primary reasons: because it will be easier and because they must. Over time, technology will enable more production with less sacrifice. Meanwhile, history suggests that concentration of wealth in too few hands leads to social pressures that will either be addressed through politics or violence or both.
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BrightVibes

BrightVibes | new society | Scoop.it
We believe in the power of Contagiously Inspiring Stories. As an opposing force to the torrent of negative news that leaves people numb, we put positive change makers in the spotlight. With our stories we want to inspire you to also have positive impact.
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'Digitale revolutie zet oncologische zorg op zijn kop' - Skipr

'Digitale revolutie zet oncologische zorg op zijn kop' - Skipr | new society | Scoop.it

Meer en beter toegankelijke digitale data, snellere informatie-uitwisseling, predictive genomics en laagdrempelige diagnostiek gaan de komende jaren tot grote veranderingen in de oncologische zorg leiden. Dat voorspelt Michel Rudolphie, scheidend voorzitter van KWF Kankerbestrijding.

Bijna vijf procent van alle Nederlanders, oftewel zo’n 800 duizend mensen, leeft met kanker of heeft kanker gehad. Dat aantal blijft in de toekomst alleen maar toenemen – door vergrijzing, maar ook door verbeterde (vroeg)diagnostiek zoals bevolkingsonderzoeken. Dit maakt dat kanker een grote impact heeft op onze maatschappij, maar ook op de inrichting van de zorg en met name de ziekenhuiszorg. De ontwikkelingen op dit gebied en de informatie-uitwisseling gaan volgens Rudolphie zo snel dat ziekenhuizen veel moeten investeren in nieuwe businessmodellen, in het opleiden van zorgverleners en in het inrichten van het ziekenhuis op nieuwe behoeften van afnemers van zorg.

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Stephen's Web ~ Patterns of Inclusion: Fostering Digital Citizenship through Hybrid Education ~ Stephen Downes

Stephen's Web ~ Patterns of Inclusion: Fostering Digital Citizenship through Hybrid Education ~ Stephen Downes | new society | Scoop.it

This is an erudite and intelligent paper combining three major threads. First, the idea of digital citizenship as an extension of T.H. Marshall's influential conception of social, economic and political rights and responsibilties. Second is the elucidation of hybrid education based on the concepts of 'becoming', which leads to plurality ("nobody is ever the same as anyone else who ever lived, lives or will live.”), and 'belonging', as seen in the concept of community ("this reconsideration of digital citizenship takes aim at the philosophical and ethical foundations for a reconfiguration of education"). And third is the mechanism of patterns and pattern languages, draw brom Alexander's ideas of patterns as bound to the problem, linked to the community, and connected to other patterns. The outcome is an EduPLoP(Pattern Languages of Programs) workshop, which is described and assessed in this paper.

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action hunger's free vending machines feed and clothe homeless

action hunger's free vending machines feed and clothe homeless | new society | Scoop.it
with a special card that permits three items a day, action hunger remodels vending machines to enable the homeless to withdraw free, essential food and clothing.
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Happiness course endorsed by Dalai Lama to begin in West Byfleet

Happiness course endorsed by Dalai Lama to begin in West Byfleet | new society | Scoop.it
The Dalai Lama has endorsed a happiness course taking place in West Byfleet beginning on January 16.

Exploring What Matters has been developed by Action for Happiness – a group of 60,000 members hoping to create a happier world.

The Dalai Lama said: "As patron of Action for Happiness I am delighted to see the work being done by members of this movement to create a happier and more caring society. I wholeheartedly support the Exploring What Matters course and hope that many thousands of people will benefit from it and be inspired to take their own action to help create a happier world."
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The Top 10 Tech Skills Employers Are Hiring For

The Top 10 Tech Skills Employers Are Hiring For | new society | Scoop.it
The Top 10 Tech Skills Employers Are Hiring For Percentages represent the number of times that each tech skill appears in job descriptions for tech positions. 
1. Java (30%) 
2. Agile (27%) 
3. JavaScript (26%) 
4. .NET (19%) 
5. Python (15%) 
6. Microsoft SQL Server (12%) 
7. Oracle (12%) 
8. C or C++ (12%) 
9. Git (11%) 
10. AWS (11%)
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10 Future Healthcare Jobs To Watch

10 Future Healthcare Jobs To Watch | new society | Scoop.it

To say that healthcare is changing would be an understatement. Technology is transforming it, and some healthcare jobs may cease to exist in the future. It is exciting to see what kind of new jobs will come about in the future and the training required for the next-generation workforce.

Here’s Frost & Sullivan’s take on 10 jobs that are likely to come about in the near future: 

1. Reconstructive Surgery 3D Printing Specialist

2.Voice Assistant Healthcare Content Specialists

3. Robotic Clinical Documentation Scribes

4.Virtual Hospital Manager

5. Precision Medicine Compounding Pharmacist

6. Epigenetic Counselors

7.Health Finances Planner

8. Brain Neurostimulation Specialist

9. Health Data Hacker Thinkstock Hacker

10. Biological Terrorist

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WorkdayVoice: 5 Non-CFO Skills CFOs Need Now

WorkdayVoice: 5 Non-CFO Skills CFOs Need Now | new society | Scoop.it
We are at a turning point in human history, where we are seeing a confluence of many innovative and disruptive technologies that in conjunction, will bring about a tsunami of change. Disruptive technologies such as AI, robotics, IoT and blockchain have the potential of transforming economic structures, business models, companies and jobs. Organizations need to consider preparing for these disruptive technologies and massive changes in ways that are different from previous approaches to handling emerging technologies. We are approaching the post-digital transformation era and inching towards the rise of the 4th platform, where it might not be sufficient to create technology innovation centers within the organization, invest in a proof of concept or pilot projects to experiment with new technologies.
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Why are America's farmers killing themselves in record numbers?

Why are America's farmers killing themselves in record numbers? | new society | Scoop.it


The suicide rate for farmers is more than double that of veterans. Former farmer Debbie Weingarten gives an insider’s perspective on farm life – and how to help

It is dark in the workshop, but what light there is streams in patches through the windows. Cobwebs coat the wrenches, the cans of spray paint and the rungs of an old wooden chair where Matt Peters used to sit. A stereo plays country music, left on by the renter who now uses the shop.

“It smells so good in here,” I say. “Like …”

“Men, working,” finishes Ginnie Peters.

We inhale. “Yes.”

Ginnie pauses at the desk where she found her husband Matt’s letter on the night he died.

“My dearest love,” it began, and continued for pages. “I have torment in my head.”

On the morning of his last day, 12 May 2011, Matt stood in the kitchen of their farmhouse.

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Fake news travels six times faster than the truth on Twitter

Fake news travels six times faster than the truth on Twitter | new society | Scoop.it
Despite the belief that armies of bots are spreading misinformation, it is people who are most likely to share incorrect information
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The End of Democratic Capitalism? –

In bowing to China, Apple forces us to contemplate the true role of business in society
“China is likely to emerge in the next few years as the world’s largest supplier of capital.” — Brookings Institute, Jan. 2017

A clash of fundamentally competing economic philosophies broke into the mainstream news this weekend, with the fate of democratic capitalism hanging in the balance. And while it’s likely too early to call a winner, the trends are certainly not looking good for democracy as we understand it in the west.*

First, the news. Bowing to Chinese law, Apple will be storing the keys to its Chinese customers’ data inside China — subjecting that information to Chinese legal oversight, a system which, as Yonatan Zunger points out, is markedly distinct from that of the United States, where Apple had heretofore protected its Chinese customers.

Why does this matter? Certainly it’s a blow for the individual privacy of Apple’s Chinese customers, but then again, to presume one company — even one as powerful as Apple — could force its policies on the Chinese state is beyond naive. No, to my mind this matters because it creates a precedent for an approach to capitalism that puts profit before principle, regardless of externalities or long term consequence. And that should concern us all
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The Innovative Coworking Spaces of 15th-Century Italy

The Innovative Coworking Spaces of 15th-Century Italy | new society | Scoop.it

Coworking spaces are on the rise, from Google’s “Campus” in London to NextSpace in California. Much has been made of these shared workspaces as a brand-new idea, one that barely existed 10 years ago. But the way they function reminds me of a very old idea: the Renaissance “bottega” (workshop) of 15th-century Florence, in which master artists were committed to teaching new artists, talents were nurtured, new techniques were at work, and new artistic forms came to light with artists competing among themselves but also working together.

The Renaissance put knowledge at the heart of value creation, which took place in the workshops of these artisans, craftsmen, and artists. There they met and worked with painters, sculptors, and other artists; architects, mathematicians, engineers, anatomists, and other scientists; and rich merchants who were patrons. All of them gave form and life to Renaissance communities, generating aesthetic and expressive as well as social and economic values. The result was entrepreneurship that conceived revolutionary ways of working, of designing and delivering products and services, and even of seeing the world.

Florentine workshops were communities of creativity and innovation where dreams, passions, and projects could intertwine. The apprentices, workers, artisans, engineers, budding artists, and guest artists were interdependent yet independent, their disparate efforts loosely coordinated by a renowned artist at the center — the “Master.” But while he might help spot new talent, broker connections, and mentor younger artists, the Master did not define others’ work.

For example, Andrea del Verrocchio (1435–1488) was a sculptor, painter, and goldsmith, but his pupils weren’t limited to following his preferred pursuits. In his workshop, younger artists might pursue engineering, architecture, or various business or scientific ventures. Verrocchio’s workshop gave free rein to a new generation of entrepreneurial artists — eclectic characters such as Leonardo da Vinci (1452–1519), Sandro Botticelli (1445–1510), Pietro Perugino (c. 1450–1523), and Domenico Ghirlandaio (1449–1494).

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Donut-economie moet ook over sociale ondergrens gaan

Donut-economie moet ook over sociale ondergrens gaan | new society | Scoop.it
In de publiciteit gaat de aandacht tot nu toe vooral uit naar het ecologisch plafond terwijl de sociale ondergrens toch ook een fundamentele rol speelt in Raworths theorie. Alle reden voor het sociale domein om zich het donut-denken snel eigen te maken.
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BrightVibes

BrightVibes | new society | Scoop.it
We believe in the power of Contagiously Inspiring Stories. As an opposing force to the torrent of negative news that leaves people numb, we put positive change makers in the spotlight. With our stories we want to inspire you to also have positive impact.
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City of Barcelona Kicks Out Microsoft in Favor of Linux and Open Source

City of Barcelona Kicks Out Microsoft in Favor of Linux and Open Source | new society | Scoop.it

City of Barcelona Kicks Out Microsoft in Favor of Linux and Open Source
Last updated January 12, 2018 By Derick Sullivan M. Lobga 36 
Brief: Barcelona city administration has prepared the roadmap to migrate its existing system from Microsoft and proprietary software to Linux and Open Source software.

A Spanish newspaper, El País, has reported that the City of Barcelona is in the process of migrating its computer system to Open Source technologies.

According to the news report, the city plans to first replace all its user applications with alternative open source applications. This will go on until the only remaining proprietary software will be Windows where it will finally be replaced with a Linux distribution.

Barcelona will go open source by Spring 2019
The City has plans for 70% of its software budget to be invested in open source software in the coming year. The transition period, according to Francesca Bria (Commissioner of Technology and Digital Innovation at the City Council) will be completed before the mandate of the present administrators come to an end in Spring 2019.

Migration aims to help local IT talent
For this to be accomplished, the City of Barcelona will start outsourcing IT projects to local small and medium sized enterprises. They will also be taking in 65 new developers to build software programs for their specific needs.

One of the major projects envisaged is the development of a digital market – an online platform – whereby small businesses will use to take part in public tenders.

Ubuntu is the choice for Linux distributions
The Linux distro to be used may be Ubuntu as the City is already running a pilot project of 1000 Ubuntu-based desktops. The news report also reveals that Outlook mail client and Exchange Server will be replaced with Open-Xchange meanwhile Firefox and LibreOffice will take the place of Internet Explorer and Microsoft Office.

Barcelona becomes the first municipality to join “Public Money, Public Code” campaign
With this move, Barcelona becomes the first municipality to join the European campaign “Public Money, Public Code“.

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Why the Controversial "Black Museum" Is 'Black Mirror''s Most Important Episode

Why the Controversial "Black Museum" Is 'Black Mirror''s Most Important Episode | new society | Scoop.it
UTOPIANISM RESTS UPON a single, fundamental truth: that we can be better than we were before. But what if we can’t? What if we’re stuck in a loop, slave to new innovations that only amplify hate, human flaw, and social fragility? In the techno-dystopian wheelhouse that is Charlie Brooker’s darkly imaginative anthology series, Black Mirror, that is often the case at hand.

In Brooker’s inverted paradise, proximity comes at a price. What one is willing to give up for it—either to create the gulf or to clear it—is the source of all the sad chaos that outlines his futurescape. His stories are of a world in the throes of madness—be it dread brought on by devices that govern human emotion (“Nosedive”; “The Entire History of You”) or the mayhem that arises out of one’s inability to access, or sustain, a particular social standing (“The National Anthem”; “Shut Up and Dance”). What at first feels like a twisted fairytale slowly unravels into a vision of the quotidian, as if Brooker is saying: our emerging reality is much more unnerving than pure fiction.
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A school in India defies the traditional education model

A school in India defies the traditional education model | new society | Scoop.it

India's Tamarind Tree School embraces an open education approach to learning. (Image credit: Michelle Chawla, License: CC-BY-SA)


Located in a sleepy village just two hours away from the bustling metropolis of Mumbai is a school that defies traditional educational models by collaboratively owning, building, and sharing knowledge and technology. The school uses only open source software and hardware in its approach to learning, and takes pride in the fact that none of its students have used or even seen proprietary software, including the ubiquitous Windows operating system.


The Tamarind Tree School, located in Dahanu Taluka, Maharashtra, India, is an experiment in open education. Open education is a philosophy about how people produce, share, and build on knowledge and technology, advocating a world in which education is for social good, and everyone has equal opportunity and access to education, training, and knowledge.

Why open education?
The school's founders believe that the commodification and ownership of knowledge is the primary reason for the inequity in access to quality educational resources. While the Internet may have created a proliferation of digital content and learning tools, the relationship between technology creation, knowledge building, access, and ownership remains skewed for most people in society.

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Heartland startups can avoid Silicon Valley’s pitfalls by being better neighbors

Heartland startups can avoid Silicon Valley’s pitfalls by being better neighbors | new society | Scoop.it
Most articles written about startup scenes outside of the coasts use the phrase “the next Silicon Valley.” As in, St. Louis or Pittsburgh is poised to be the “next Silicon Valley.” But do these cities really want to be the next Silicon Valley? It’s a serious question. While the Bay Area is known for innovation, it’s also known for ridiculously high housing prices that keep even some relatively well-paid tech workers (to say nothing of teachers, police officers, and nurses) struggling to afford a place to live. In an era where income inequality is a growing concern, Silicon Valley remains one of the country’s most economically unequal communities. 

The problems of Silicon Valley aren’t restricted to expensive housing. The area’s tech companies often have a reputation for being insular and disengaged from their community. As tech communities and startup scenes grow across the Heartland, it’s important to take a thoughtful approach to creating communities where the wealth and economic opportunity created by tech companies — and basics like housing — isn’t just available to a lucky few. And it’s important that companies make an active effort to improve the cities and communities they call home. Here are a few ways your company can do that.
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The face of digital transformation for 2018

The face of digital transformation for 2018 | new society | Scoop.it

A transformation mask is a type of mask used by indigenous people of the Northwest Coast and Alaska in ritual dances. These masks usually depict an outer, animal visage, which the performer can open by pulling a string to reveal an inner, human face carved in wood.

The mask can represent our struggle between our human and our animal natures, but equally important is the element of surprise as the one face gives way to the next.

We are all involved in today's digital transformation and have an amazing opportunity to create a new, softer, more approachable face for our industry. This column talks about how we can improve our image as we digitally transform and inspires us all to envision what the world will see when we pull the string on our transformation mask to expose our new inner selves to the world.

The mask is a material metaphor for carving our digitized world into a shape never before seen in a process that blurs the lines between science and art. But inside that transformation is another amazing opportunity to create a better image of ourselves. Will our new inner, transformed face be for the greater good of all?

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A baker's dozen predictions of retail predictions for 2018

A baker's dozen predictions of retail predictions for 2018 | new society | Scoop.it

2017 was one of the most transformative years for the retail industry that I can remember. 2018 is likely to be just as wild and woolly, albeit in somewhat different ways. Here's my attempt to go beyond the more obvious predictions and go out on the limb just a bit.
1. Physical retail isn't dead. Boring retail is. A lot of stores closed in 2017. Often forgotten is that a lot opened as well. Many stores will close in 2018. Many will open as well. By this time next year roughly 90% of all retail will still be done in physical store, so please can we shut up already about the "retail apocalypse." 
2. Consolidation accelerates. In many aspects of today's retail world, scale is more important than ever and this will continue to drive a robust pace of mergers and acquisitions. 
3. Honey, I shrunk the store. Small is the new black in many ways. . 4. Increasingly, Amazon dominates buying. Shopping is different. It's experiential, it's social, tactile--and the role of physical stores is often paramount. 
5. Amazon doubles down on brick & mortar. 
6. Private brands and monobrands shine.
7. Digital and analog learn to dance. 
8. The great bifurcation widens. And it's death in the middle. 
9. Omnichannel is dead. Digital-first, harmonized retail rules. 
10. Pure plays say "buh-bye." 
11. The returns problem is ready for its close up. P
12. "Cool" technology underwhelms. 
13. The search for scarcity and the quest for remarkable ramps up. 

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"Only Our Youth Can Save the Planet" - Kumi Naidoo | Inter Press Service

"Only Our Youth Can Save the Planet" - Kumi Naidoo | Inter Press Service | new society | Scoop.it


SUVA, Fiji, Dec 20 2017 (IPS) - “Today’s youth should think of new solutions for old problems like climate change and social injustice.”

That’s the strong message of the South African activist Kumi Naidoo. The former executive director of Greenpeace says young people need to be more innovative and visionary, “because the solutions of my generation have failed.”

After battling apartheid in South Africa, Kumi Naidoo led numerous global campaigns to protect
human rights.

Among other organizations, he headed CIVICUS, an alliance for citizen participation. It was at the International Civil Society Week (ICSW), organized by CIVICUS in Fiji in December, that Naidoo spoke out on youth and innovation.

“My advise for young people is: don’t put any faith in the current leaders. They are the biggest bunch of losers you are going to find. Because they are unwilling to accept that they have got us into this mess,” says Naidoo.

“Basically, we are using old solutions that have never worked in the past anyway,” Naidoo contin-ues.

Albert Einstein said: ‘the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again, expecting to get different results.’ If humanity continues to do what we always did, we will get what always got: inequality, unsustainability and environmental destruction.”

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