New Media
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Scooped by Konstantinos Chatzopoulos
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Calling media "the extensions of man," McLuhan based his theory on the fact that content follows form, and the insurgent technologies give rise to new structures of feeling and thought, new manners...

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McLuhan's Laws of Media

McLuhan's Laws of Media | New Media | Scoop.it
Konstantinos Chatzopoulos's insight:

ENHANCE, REVERSE, RETRIEVE, OBSOLESCE

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'Fifty Years in the Global Village': Remembering Marshall McLuhan on His 100th Birthday | The Nation

'Fifty Years in the Global Village': Remembering Marshall McLuhan on His 100th Birthday | The Nation | New Media | Scoop.it
His writing anticipated our own media age of Facebook and Twitter.
Konstantinos Chatzopoulos's insight:

"When used today, “global village” usually has positive connotations. As media and commerce make us more interconnected, the argument goes, the world shrinks into a peaceful, prosperous, global village. But McLuhan did not think of the global village as a happy place at all. He saw it as a place of terror, the home we would all have to move to when electronic media had finished re-tribalizing us.  "

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Marshall McLuhan: "The Medium is the Message"

Marshall McLuhan is considered the first father and leading prophet of the electronic age.
Konstantinos Chatzopoulos's insight:

"If the work of the city is the remaking or translating of man into a more suitable form than his nomadic ancestors achieved, then might not our current translation of our entire lives into the spiritual form of information seem to make of the entire globe, and of the human family, a single consciousness?"


In statements like this, McLuhan both announces the existence of a global village, another word he is credited for coining, and predicts the intensification of the world community to its present expression. All of this was done in the early 1960s at a time when television was still in its infancy, and the personal computer was almost twenty years into the future.

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