New Lothrop Earth Science
119 views | +0 today
Follow
New Lothrop Earth Science
Topics for Earth Science
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Mr. Delemeester
Scoop.it!

M4.2 - 8km S of Galesburg, Michigan

M4.2 - 8km S of Galesburg, Michigan | New Lothrop Earth Science | Scoop.it
USGS Earthquake Hazards Program, responsible for monitoring, reporting, and researching earthquakes and earthquake hazards
Mr. Delemeester's insight:

Many people I know felt the quake on Saturday!  I was in Sebewaing and did not sense the shaking.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mr. Delemeester
Scoop.it!

New radar increases meteorology, research potential for CAFNR

New radar increases meteorology, research potential for CAFNR | New Lothrop Earth Science | Scoop.it
Currently, the closest two radars are in St. Louis and Kansas City.
Mr. Delemeester's insight:

Research at the University level looks something like this...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mr. Delemeester
Scoop.it!

Venus revealed in high-resolution radar images from Earth | Astronomy Now

Venus revealed in high-resolution radar images from Earth | Astronomy Now | New Lothrop Earth Science | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mr. Delemeester
Scoop.it!

Our Milky Way Galaxy May Be Larger Than Thought | Astronomy | Sci-News.com

Our Milky Way Galaxy May Be Larger Than Thought | Astronomy | Sci-News.com | New Lothrop Earth Science | Scoop.it
According to a new study led by Yan Xu of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, NY, our Galaxy is at least 50% larger than is commonly estimated.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mr. Delemeester
Scoop.it!

Can Dark Matter Explain Why the Sun Acts So Weird?

Can Dark Matter Explain Why the Sun Acts So Weird? | New Lothrop Earth Science | Scoop.it
It's a crazy-sounding idea, but one that the Large Hadron Collider's next run of experiment could prove (or disprove)
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mr. Delemeester
Scoop.it!

Hidden in plain sight: the Milky Way's new companions - The Conversation AU

Hidden in plain sight: the Milky Way's new companions - The Conversation AU | New Lothrop Earth Science | Scoop.it
Several dwarf galaxies have been discovered close to our own Milky Way and are adding to our understanding of how galaxies form. But why haven't astronomers seen them before?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mr. Delemeester
Scoop.it!

Plug tile drainage -on purpose?

Plug tile drainage -on purpose? | New Lothrop Earth Science | Scoop.it
Plug is the wrong word. Using drainage control boxes on level fields can reduce phosphorus losses by 30% or more, and retain moisture for summer.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mr. Delemeester from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Scientists have witnessed a direct connection between CO2 and thermal radiation that heats the Earth

Scientists have witnessed a direct connection between CO2 and thermal radiation that heats the Earth | New Lothrop Earth Science | Scoop.it

For the first time, scientists have witnessed a direct connection between rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide and an increase in the amount of thermal radiation striking Earth’s surface. The work affirms a cornerstone of the theory that humans have contributed to worldwide warming in recent decades, the researchers report online February 25 in Nature.

 

Carbon dioxide, like other greenhouse gases, can absorb and reradiate infrared light back down to Earth. This process traps thermal energy around the planet that would otherwise escape into space. To uncover how large an effect recent CO2 increases have had on Earth’s energy balance, climate scientist Daniel Feldman of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California and colleagues monitored the amount of thermal radiation hitting two sites in Alaska and Oklahoma on cloudless days. Because CO2 emits light within a signature range of wavelengths, the researchers could differentiate between energy balance changes caused by CO2 and those caused by other factors, such as water vapor.

 

Over 10 years of near-daily observations, the team found that a rise in CO2 concentrations of 22 parts per million boosted the amount of incoming thermal radiation from CO2 by 0.2 watts per square meter, an increase of about 10 percent. The researchers say their results agree with the theoretical predictions of CO2-driven warming used in simulations of future climate.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mr. Delemeester from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Supermassive black holes at the cores of galaxies blast radiation and ultra-fast winds outward

Supermassive black holes at the cores of galaxies blast radiation and ultra-fast winds outward | New Lothrop Earth Science | Scoop.it

By looking at the speed of ambient gas spewing out from a well-known quasar, astronomers are gaining insight into how black holes and their host galaxies might have evolved at the same time. Using the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array(link is external) (NuSTAR), researchers were able to use the X-ray spectra of an extremely luminous black hole (quasar PDS 456) to detect a nearly spherical stream of highly ionized gas streaming out of it.


The discovery allowed astronomers to measure, for the first time, the strength of ultra-fast black hole winds and show that they are mighty enough to affect the fate of their host galaxies. The evolution of galaxies is connected to the growth of supermassive black holes in their centers. During the quasar phase, a huge luminosity is released as matter falls onto the black hole, and radiation-driven winds can transfer most of this energy back to the host galaxy.


"We know that black holes in the centers of galaxies can feed on matter, and this process can produce winds. This is thought to regulate the growth of the galaxies," said Fiona Harrison of the California Institute of Technology, the principal investigator of NuSTAR and a co-author on a new paper about the results appearing in the Feb. 19 issue of the journal Science. "Knowing the speed, shape and size of the winds, we can figure out how powerful they are.”


Supermassive black holes blast matter into their host galaxies, including X-ray-emitting winds traveling at up to one-third the speed of light. In the new study, astronomers determined that PDS 456, an extremely luminous active black hole, or quasar, has winds that carry more energy every second than what is emitted by more than 1 trillion suns. That's enough of a punch to affect the entire galaxy and its ability to make stars.


“By looking at this huge spherical outflow, we can see a mechanism to explain the correlation between black hole and galaxy formation,” said Bill Craig of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Space Science Laboratory at University of California, Berkeley.


NuSTAR and the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton simultaneously observed PDS 456, located more than 2 billion light-years away, on five separate occasions in 2013 and 2014. The space telescopes complement each other by seeing different parts of the X-ray light spectrum: XMM-Newton sees low-energy X-rays and NuSTAR sees high-energy X-rays. Their goal was to look for iron, which is blown from the black hole winds along with other matter.


The researchers looked for scattered light signatures from iron atoms originating from the sides of the supermassive black hole. The NuSTAR's higher-energy X-ray data, when combined with observations from XMM-Newton, provided the key information, proving that the winds emanate not in a beam but in a nearly spherical fashion.


With the shape and extent of the winds determined, the researchers could then determine the power of the wind and the degree to which they can quench the formation of new stars. The new report demonstrates that a supermassive black hole and the galaxy that nurtures it are connected by high-speed winds. As the black holes bulk up in size, their winds push vast amounts of matter outward through the galaxy, which ultimately stops new stars from forming.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mr. Delemeester from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

A Binary Star Passed Through Our Solar System Just 70,000 Years Ago

A Binary Star Passed Through Our Solar System Just 70,000 Years Ago | New Lothrop Earth Science | Scoop.it

Astronomers have reported the discovery of a star that passed within the outer reaches of our Solar System just 70,000 years ago, when early humans were beginning to take a foothold here on Earth. The stellar flyby was likely close enough to have influenced the orbits of comets in the outer Oort Cloud, but Neandertals and Cro Magnons – our early ancestors – were not in danger. But now astronomers are ready to look for more stars like this one.

 

Lead author Eric Mamajek from the University of Rochester and collaborators report in The Closest Known Flyby Of A Star To The Solar System (published in Astrophysical Journal on February 12, 2015) that “the flyby of this system likely caused negligible impact on the flux of long-period comets, the recent discovery of this binary highlights that dynamically important Oort Cloud perturbers may be lurking among nearby stars.”

 

The star, named Scholz’s star, was just 8/10ths of a light year at closest approach to the Sun. In comparison, the nearest known star to the Sun is Proxima Centauri at 4.2 light years. At present, Scholz’s star is 20 light years away, one of the 70 closest stars to our Solar System. However, the astronomers calculated, with a 98% certainty, that Scholz’s passed within 0.5 light years, approximately 50,000 Astronomical Units (A.U.) of the Sun.

 

In 1984, the paleontologists David Raup and Jack Sepkoski postulated that a dim dwarf star, now widely known on the internet as the Nemesis Star, was in a very long period Solar orbit. The elliptical orbit brought the proposed star into the inner Solar System every 26 million years, causing a rain of comets and mass extinctions on that time period. By no coincidence, because of the sheer numbers of red dwarfs throughout the galaxy, Scholz’s star nearly fits such a scenario. Nemesis was proposed to be in a orbit extending 95,000 A.U. compared to Scholz’s nearest flyby distance of 50,000 A.U. Recent studies of impact rates on Earth, the Moon and Marshave discounted the existence of a Nemesis star (see New Impact Rate Count Lays Nemesis Theory to Rest, Universe Today, 8/1/2011).

 

 

But Scholz’s star — a real-life Oort Cloud perturber — was a small red dwarf star star with a M9 spectral classification. M-class stars are the most common star in our galaxy and likely the whole Universe, as 75% of all stars are of this type. Scholz’s is just 15% of the mass of our Sun. Furthermore, Scholz’s is a binary star system with the secondary being a brown dwarf of class T5. Brown Dwarfs are believed to be plentiful in the Universe but due to their very low intrinsic brightness, they are very difficult to discover … except, as in this case, as companions to brighter stars.

 

The astronomers reported that their survey of new astrometric data of nearby stars identified Scholz’s as an object of interest. The star’s transverse velocity was very low, that is, the stars sideways motion. Additionally, they recognized that its radial velocity – motion towards or away from us, was quite high. For Scholz’s, the star was speeding directly away from our Solar System. How close could Scholz’s star have been to our system in the past? 

 

Scholz’s star is an active star and the researchers added that while it was nearby, it shined at a dimly of about 11th magnitude but eruptions and flares on its surface could have raised its brightness to visible levels and could have been seen as a “new” star by primitive humans of the time.Scholz’s star is an active star and the researchers added that while it was nearby, it shined at a dimly of about 11th magnitude but eruptions and flares on its surface could have raised its brightness to visible levels and could have been seen as a “new” star by primitive humans of the time.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mr. Delemeester from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Perfect colors, captured with one ultra-thin nanotech lens

Perfect colors, captured with one ultra-thin nanotech lens | New Lothrop Earth Science | Scoop.it

 Most lenses are, by definition, curved. After all, they are named for their resemblance to lentils, and a glass lens made flat is just a window with no special powers. But a new type of lens created at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences(SEAS) turns conventional optics on its head.


A major leap forward from a prototype device demonstrated in 2012, it is an ultra-thin, completely flat optical component made of a glass substrate and tiny, light-concentrating silicon antennas. Light shining on it bends instantaneously, rather than gradually, while passing through. The bending effects can be designed in advance, by an algorithm, and fine-tuned to fit almost any purpose.


With this new invention described today in Science, the Harvard research team has overcome an inherent drawback of a wafer-thin lens: light at different wavelengths (i.e., colors) responds to the surface very differently. Until now, this phenomenon has prevented planar optics from being used with broadband light. Now, instead of treating all wavelengths equally, the researchers have devised a flat lens with antennas that compensate for the wavelength differences and produce a consistent effect—for example, deflecting three beams of different colors by the same angle, or focusing those colors on a single spot.


“What this now means is that complicated effects like color correction, which in a conventional optical system would require light to pass through several thick lenses in sequence, can be achieved in one extremely thin, miniaturized device,” said principal investigator Federico Capasso, the Robert L. Wallace Professor of Applied Physics and Vinton Hayes Senior Research Fellow in Electrical Engineering at Harvard SEAS.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
Donald Schwartz's curator insight, February 20, 2015 11:19 AM

Less glass is good. I'm so excited, I just can't hide it. 

Scooped by Mr. Delemeester
Scoop.it!

Inner Core of Earth Has Its Own Inner Core, Geologists Say - Sci-News.com

Inner Core of Earth Has Its Own Inner Core, Geologists Say - Sci-News.com | New Lothrop Earth Science | Scoop.it
Geologists found that Earth's inner core has an inner core of its own, which has surprising properties that could reveal new information about our planet.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mr. Delemeester
Scoop.it!

Introduction to Astronomy: Crash Course Astronomy #1 - YouTube

Today on Crash Course Astronomy, Phil invites you to head outside and take a look at all the incredible things you can see with your naked eye. -- Table of C...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mr. Delemeester
Scoop.it!

Fenway Park groundskeepers clear the snow with black sand. Brilliant.

Fenway Park groundskeepers clear the snow with black sand. Brilliant. | New Lothrop Earth Science | Scoop.it
The "albedo effect" is why the asphalt gets so darn hot in the summer, and why you should wear white to keep cool.
Mr. Delemeester's insight:

Earth Science to the rescue!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mr. Delemeester
Scoop.it!

‘Polar’ meets ‘pineapple’: The meteorology behind a unique winter storm

‘Polar’ meets ‘pineapple’: The meteorology behind a unique winter storm | New Lothrop Earth Science | Scoop.it
An arctic front and tropical moisture conspired to dump heavy snow across the D.C. region on Thursday.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mr. Delemeester
Scoop.it!

Enormous planet found to be in a quadruple star system | Astronomy Now

Enormous planet found to be in a quadruple star system | Astronomy Now | New Lothrop Earth Science | Scoop.it
Mr. Delemeester's insight:

Interesting patterns - Tattoine on steroids?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mr. Delemeester
Scoop.it!

Climate change ruled out as most dominant factor for watersheds

Climate change ruled out as most dominant factor for watersheds | New Lothrop Earth Science | Scoop.it
A UBC-Chinese Academy of Sciences joint study shows that land cover plays as significant a role as climate change on the hydrology of watersheds.
Mr. Delemeester's insight:

Important factors to consider as we begin to create the Misteguay Watershed Plan

more...
Mr. Delemeester's curator insight, March 21, 2015 12:16 PM

Important factors to consider as we begin to create the Misteguay Creek Watershed Plan.

Scooped by Mr. Delemeester
Scoop.it!

Moon impact! NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter finds new craters | Astronomy Now

Moon impact! NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter finds new craters | Astronomy Now | New Lothrop Earth Science | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mr. Delemeester
Scoop.it!

Company plans new technology at rare earth minerals site

Company plans new technology at rare earth minerals site | New Lothrop Earth Science | Scoop.it
Ucore, the developer of the Bokan-Dotson Ridge rare earth elements mining project on Prince of Wales Island, has acquired the exclusive rights to new technology for environmentally successful mine development.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mr. Delemeester from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Huge ocean confirmed underneath solar system’s largest moon, containing more water than Earth's oceans combined

Huge ocean confirmed underneath solar system’s largest moon, containing more water than Earth's oceans combined | New Lothrop Earth Science | Scoop.it

The solar system’s largest moon, Ganymede, in orbit around Jupiter, harbors an underground ocean containing more water than all the oceans on Earth. Scientists were already fairly confident in the ocean’s existence, based on the moon’s smooth icy surface—evidence of past resurfacing by the ocean—and other observations by the Galileo spacecraft, which made a handful of flybys in the 1990s. But new observations by the Hubble Space Telescope, published online today in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics, remove any remaining doubt. Ganymede now joins Jupiter’s Europa and two moons of Saturn, Titan and Enceladus, as moons with subsurface oceans—and good places to look for life.

 

Ceres, the largest object in the asteroid belt, may also have a subsurface ocean. The new results come from Hubble’s observations of Ganymede’s magnetic field, which produces two auroral belts (pictured) that can be detected in the ultraviolet. Because of interactions with Jupiter’s own magnetic field, these belts rock back and forth. However, there is a third magnetic field in the mix—one emanating from the electrically conductive, saltwater ocean and induced by Jupiter’s field—that counterbalances Jupiter’s field and reduces the rocking of the auroral belts. The Hubble study suggests that the ocean can be no deeper than 330 kilometers below the surface.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, March 14, 2015 9:55 AM

No life without water ...

Sepp Hasslberger's curator insight, March 14, 2015 6:59 PM

Ganymede, a Jupiter moon, with lots of water - it looks like water is very common on planets and moons, more so than we thought previously. 


And in consequence, life forms as we know them might also turn out very abundant...

Rescooped by Mr. Delemeester from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Dazzling display of light by auroras on Saturn

Dazzling display of light by auroras on Saturn | New Lothrop Earth Science | Scoop.it

Scientists first observed Saturn’s auroras in 1979. Decades later, these shimmering ribbons of light still fascinate. For one thing they’re magnificently tall, rising hundreds of miles above the planet’s poles. And unlike on Earth where bright displays fizzle after only a few hours, auroras on Saturn can shine for days. Auroras are produced when speeding particles accelerated by the sun’s energy collide with gases in a planet’s atmosphere. The gases fluoresce, emitting flashes of light at different wavelengths. Watch the video to see an edge-on view of Saturn’s northern and southern lights courtesy of NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mr. Delemeester from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Approaching Titan a Billion Times Closer

Remember the Titan (Landing): Ten years ago today, Jan. 14, 2005, the Huygens probe touched down on Saturn's largest moon, Titan. 

This new, narrated movie was created with data collected by Cassini's imaging cameras and the Huygens Descent Imager/Spectral Radiometer (DISR). The first minute shows a zoom into images of Titan from Cassini's cameras, while the remainder of the movie depicts the view from Huygens during the last few hours of its historic descent and landing. 

It was October 15, 1997, when NASA's Cassini orbiter embarked on an epic, seven-year voyage to the Saturnian system. Hitching a ride was ESA's Huygens probe, destined for Saturn's largest moon, Titan. The final chapter of the interplanetary trek for Huygens began on 25 December 2004 when it deployed from the orbiter for a 21-day solo cruise toward the haze-shrouded moon. Plunging into Titan's atmosphere, on January 14 2005, the probe survived the hazardous 2 hour 27 minute descent to touch down safely on Titan’s frozen surface. Today, the Cassini spacecraft remains in orbit at Saturn. Its mission will end in 2017, 20 years after its journey began. More information and images from the mission at http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mr. Delemeester from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Martian mystery cloud defies explanation

Martian mystery cloud defies explanation | New Lothrop Earth Science | Scoop.it

A mysterious plume that appeared on Mars in 2012 is testing scientists’ understanding of the Martian atmosphere. Amateur astronomers spotted the bizarre feature rising off the edge of the red planet in March and April of 2012. It looked like a puff of dust coming off the surface, but it measured some 200 to 250 kilometers high. That is much higher than would be expected from the lower-altitude dust storms that rage across the planet.


Now a team of astronomers proposes that the plume was either a cloud of ice particles or a Martian aurora. But neither possibility fully explains the plume — raising new questions about the state of the Martian atmosphere. The study, led by astronomer Agustín Sánchez-Lavega of the University of the Basque Country in Bilbao, Spain, is published on 16 February in Nature1.


“This observation is a big surprise,” says Aymeric Spiga, a planetary scientist at the University of Pierre and Marie Curie in Paris, who was not involved in the work. “Another puzzle on Mars!”

 

The plume first appeared on 12 March 2012 as a small bump on the dawn side of Mars’s southern hemisphere. It changed shape over the next 11 days, morphing from blobs to pillars and other forms. Within weeks another plume appeared, this one also lasting about a week and a half. The plumes' sheer height is the hard thing to explain. To find an answer, Sánchez-Lavega’s team coordinated observations from amateur astronomers, and searched imagery from Mars spacecraft.


The simplest explanation is that the dust storms that frequently whirl across Mars might have kicked dust up to high altitudes. But dust has not been seen at altitudes higher than about 50 kilometres in the Martian atmosphere. And even that requires unusual weather conditions to funnel dust upwards, in an event that Spiga dubbed 'rocket dust storms' in a 2013 paper. A more plausible explanation is that the plumes were formed by shards of frozen carbon dioxide or water vapour, says Sánchez-Lavega. But their existence would require the atmosphere to be much colder than models predict for that altitude.


Sánchez-Lavega and his colleagues are still working to resolve the mystery. NASA's MAVEN spacecraft, one of the flotilla of US and Indian probes currently orbiting Mars, would be able to see a plume if it happened to be looking at the right place at the right time — but has not seen anything like it yet. And amateur astronomers watched Mars closely in April 2014, when the planet was last closest to Earth and saw no high-altitude plumes. The next such opportunity comes in 2016.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mr. Delemeester
Scoop.it!

Scientists Find Fractal Patterns in Variable Stars - Sci-News.com

Scientists Find Fractal Patterns in Variable Stars - Sci-News.com | New Lothrop Earth Science | Scoop.it
A team of researchers has found evidence for fractal behavior in the pulsations of the so-called ‘golden’ RR Lyrae variables.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mr. Delemeester
Scoop.it!

I AM A Robert Nemiroff from NASA's Astronomy Picture of the Day (APOD) website and a Professor of Astrophysics at Michigan Tech. Ask Me Anything. • /r/IAmA

I AM A Robert Nemiroff from NASA's Astronomy Picture of the Day (APOD) website and a Professor of Astrophysics at Michigan Tech. Ask Me Anything. • /r/IAmA | New Lothrop Earth Science | Scoop.it
I was one of the two [Astronomy Picture Of the Day (APOD)](http://apod.nasa.gov/) creators in 1995 and remain one of (same) two editors who pick...
more...
No comment yet.