New Leadership
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New Leadership
The Changing Face of Modern Leadership
Curated by Roger Francis
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Blockchain beyond the hype: What is the strategic business value?  

Blockchain beyond the hype: What is the strategic business value?   | New Leadership | Scoop.it

Companies can determine whether they should invest in blockchain by focusing on specific use cases and their market position.

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Joe Boutte's curator insight, June 21, 6:27 AM

I'm breaking through the fog of hype about blockchain.  Here's some good context from McKinsey.com

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How to handle a rollercoaster leader  

How to handle a rollercoaster leader   | New Leadership | Scoop.it

Volatile leadership figures may be hugely inspired – but they also present a host of opportunities for needless conflict. How can we keep their behaviours in check?

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Leading for the long term  

Leading for the long term   | New Leadership | Scoop.it

Successful CEOs combine winning strategies with compelling stories and constructive engagement with shareholders.

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How to Create a Shared Vision That Works | Jesse Lyn Stoner

How to Create a Shared Vision That Works | Jesse Lyn Stoner | New Leadership | Scoop.it
This is a “how to” post – for leaders and team members who want to create a shared vision. Over the years I have written blog posts that provide an explanation of each of these steps. Here I connect the dots by linking those posts with the steps they support.
This is my roadmap for the process of creating a shared vision that not only inspires, but also provides clarity on direction and ongoing guidelines for decision-making.

Via David Hain
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David Hain's curator insight, June 13, 5:57 AM

Great roadmap from @JesseLynnStoner on making collaborations work - packed with helpful references to resources!

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5 Things A Social Leader Does Every Day

5 Things A Social Leader Does Every Day | New Leadership | Scoop.it
Social Leadership is not just about thinking, it’s about taking action, every day. The culture of an organisation is co-created through the actions of every individual, in the moment, through the things they say and do. So whilst our journey to Social Leadership may start with introspection, it rapidly moves to action. As we curate…

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Why Today’s Incentive Thinking Is Different

Why Today’s Incentive Thinking Is Different | New Leadership | Scoop.it

Ever since people started working for each other, supervisors have tried to figure out the best way to reach their performance goals and keep workers on task. Too often in human history, this meant that people with less power were simply compelled to work, and incentives — if they existed — consisted merely of being allowed to survive. After several evolutionary waves, we have a deeper insight into what truly motivates people, and today’s incentives are about far more than compensation. As the Forbes Coaches Council puts it, “In decades past, motivating employees was all about raises, promotions, and bonuses. Those days are gone, and today’s employers are quickly learning that engagement stems from different kinds of incentives — ones that impact an employee’s emotional, rather than financial, health.” Here’s a quick look at how incentive thinking has changed over time, and how wise use of employee rewards contributes to today’s workplace culture.

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Using Improv to Transform How You Lead

Using Improv to Transform How You Lead | New Leadership | Scoop.it

 

Over the past 10 to 15 years, leading companies and management programs have begun using improv to teach creativity and collaboration. The results are compelling: Using improv can energize teams, surface breakthrough ideas, and enable learning from failure. But improv is more than just a way to co-create with colleagues; it can help leaders rethink how they manage and communicate in every interaction. For example, improvisers learn to listen to their partners and embrace failure, rather than advancing their own agenda. This sounds simple enough, but in practice, most people default to “yes, but.” They reject, contradict, or ignore their partner’s offer. For example, a novice improviser might say to the aforementioned customer service rep: “You still have that itch on your ear? I told you to see the doctor!” The gag may get a laugh, but it has killed the scene in the process.

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5 Behaviors of Leaders Who Embrace Change

5 Behaviors of Leaders Who Embrace Change | New Leadership | Scoop.it

At best, mergers and acquisitions (M&A’s) have a 50/50 chance of reaching their intended results. Study after study puts the failure rate closer to 70-90%. Why is the failure rate so high? Repeatedly, research cites the human factor as the leading reason why mergers and acquisitions fail.

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Quiet leadership is still leadership (and matters more than you think)

Quiet leadership is still leadership (and matters more than you think) | New Leadership | Scoop.it
When we think about leaders’ behaviors, it’s easier to notice the big things they do in public: A managers shares some news with her team in a meeting. A CEO makes a controversial hiring (or firing) decision that earns press coverage. A head of state tweets something incendiary. Whether we’re aware of it or not, it’s episodes like these–and what people we trust tend to say about them–that affect our beliefs about whether a given leader is good or bad, not to mention our ideas about leadership generally.

But other acts of leadership are much harder to see, generate little to no discussion, and yet are just as influential. “Quiet” forms of leadership, in other words, matter more than you might imagine. Here’s what that looks like and why it’s so important.

Via David Hain
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David Hain's curator insight, May 15, 5:53 AM

In leadership, a lot of little things often add up to more than a few big things!

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How to make shared leadership work: The 4 conditions needed – new research

How to make shared leadership work: The 4 conditions needed – new research | New Leadership | Scoop.it
Shared leadership is increasingly being used in more and more sectors. Broadly speaking, shared leadership is where the team is jointly responsible for a task and no one person is responsible for the successes or failures of the team. In other words, it is where leadership is broadly distributed, such that people within a team and organisation lead each other.

Research into shared leadership has now shown that there are four components that help with the formation of shared leadership:

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David Hain's curator insight, May 9, 4:32 AM

In a world that increasingly requires whole systems leadership - by definition, shared - we should practise these principles. Easy to state, but hard to do. Invest in them at the outset before less healthy norms kick in, or use them as a diagnostic.

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Why Leaders Who Listen Achieve Breakthroughs

Why Leaders Who Listen Achieve Breakthroughs | New Leadership | Scoop.it
As a leader, communicating can sometimes feel like Groundhog Day. No matter how hard you try to get your message across, it is all too easy to find the next day that you face the same blank stares, predictable objections, and questions that indicate that you failed to make it stick — that people just aren’t getting it. One reason leaders find themselves in this cycle is that their approach to communication is based on an outdated mental model. It’s a model best described as a “post office.” They view themselves as the sender of a message and others as the receivers. If problems arise, leaders look for disruption somewhere along the route.

The post office model focuses most leaders’ attention on the sending process, rather than the give-and-take of effective conversations. Even if they invite people to ask questions and truly value their buy-in, these leaders are still preoccupied with their message. This leaves them ignorant about the larger context and reality on the ground, including emerging issues and game-changing opportunities. In the extreme, thinking in terms of the post office model causes leaders to make decisions in isolation or miss the early warning signs of dysfunctional momentum.

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David Hain's curator insight, April 30, 7:49 AM

In leadership, 'receive' is so much more important than 'send', but so much rarer...Elizabeth Doty in praise of listening.

Jerry Busone's curator insight, April 30, 11:25 AM

Listening is a skill that requires practice . So many Leaders are solution focused they run down rabbit holes they could have avoided through listening ... all is us in general could work at improving our listening skills

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4 Impressive Ways Great Leaders Handle Their Mistakes

4 Impressive Ways Great Leaders Handle Their Mistakes | New Leadership | Scoop.it
All leaders make mistakes. To be human means to mess up once in a while. But the difference between good leaders and great ones lies in how they handle those mistakes.

What are you modeling to those around you when you make a mistake? Your team will be watching, and what they see will affect their relationship with you and the level of trust they hold for you, so it's important to get it right. Here are four simple but impressive ways you can demonstrate great leadership when you make a mistake

Via David Hain
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David Hain's curator insight, April 25, 9:17 AM

Good advice on how not to make mistakes with mistakes!

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8 traits Google has identified as belonging to toxic bosses  

ARE YOU AN EFFECTIVE TEAM LEADER? GOOGLE’S NEW MANAGEMENT BEHAVIOUR STUDY IDENTIFIES THE CORE QUALITIES THAT DISTINGUISHES THE GOOD MANAGERS FROM THE BAD

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The 6 Ways to Grow a Company

The 6 Ways to Grow a Company | New Leadership | Scoop.it

Innovation is a word that’s been attached to finding new ways to grow, and every corporation needs to grow year over year. But the first step to generating real growth is to understand where it comes from. We believe growth has been made unnecessarily complicated, so we’ve boiled it down to six simple categories with corresponding examples from Apple:

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The 2 Cs of management excellence  

The 2 Cs of management excellence   | New Leadership | Scoop.it
What is good management? For years at McKinsey, we have applied science and measurement to that question. Our research has found significant approaches to achieve superior management that spark notable organizational performance and health. They underscore the importance of consistency and coherence, the top characteristics of “good management” in my book.

It is tempting to look at an article on the cover of Businessweek or Fortune touting the latest fad and declare, “I want that.” However, that can be a big mistake – not because the ideas don’t have substance, but because they may not be consistent and coherent with the other elements of your organization’s management “recipe.”

As leadership authority John C. Maxwell opines, “If your people know what they can expect from you, they will continue to look to you for leadership.”

Via David Hain
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David Hain's curator insight, June 15, 5:33 AM

Consistency and coherence top of the list for managers, says McKinsey.

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Three Questions to Help You Become a “Yes, And” Leader

Three Questions to Help You Become a “Yes, And” Leader | New Leadership | Scoop.it
Approach every conversation as an opportunity to improvise. For more insight, read “Using Improv to Transform How You Lead.”

Via David Hain
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David Hain's curator insight, June 14, 5:26 AM

Nice memory jogger about the right kind of questions for leaders to ask.

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Inclusive Leadership Boosts Organizational Performance

Inclusive Leadership Boosts Organizational Performance | New Leadership | Scoop.it
Inclusive leadership focuses on creating a culture where differences are valued and appreciated, contrasting opinions and perspectives are encouraged and employees have a sense of both uniqueness and belonging. Research has shown that organizations with leaders that facilitate inclusive cultures tend to have employees who contribute more, stay longer, make better decisions, collaborate more effectively, perform better and are more engaged, innovative and motivated.
Organizations that have inclusive cultures are also twice as likely to meet or exceed their financial target, as well as six times more likely to be innovative and anticipate change, according to Bersin’s 2017 research on building an inclusive culture.

Our recent research further supports the notion that inclusive leadership increases an inclusive culture, as well as the notion that diversity does not always lead to inclusion. Through a survey of employees from 156 of the 250 organizations on the Forbes “America’s Best Employers for Diversity” list, we found that inclusive leadership highly correlated with inclusive culture.

Via David Hain
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David Hain's curator insight, June 12, 5:18 AM

Don't just tick the box on inclusion, there's a big bottom line benefit on offer for leaders who live it out!

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Emotional intelligence: The EAR approach

Emotional intelligence: The EAR approach | New Leadership | Scoop.it

Emotional intelligence in leadership can make the difference between a stressed and unproductive team and a happy and engaged one. Here are some simple steps for engaging with emotions in the workplace.

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How Humble Leadership Really Works

How Humble Leadership Really Works | New Leadership | Scoop.it
When you’re a leader — no matter how long you’ve been in your role or how hard the journey was to get there — you are merely overhead unless you’re bringing out the best in your employees. Unfortunately, many leaders lose sight of this.

Power, as my colleague Ena Inesi has studied, can cause leaders to become overly obsessed with outcomes and control, and, therefore, treat their employees as means to an end. As I’ve discovered in my own research, this ramps up people’s fear — fear of not hitting targets, fear of losing bonuses, fear of failing — and as a consequence people stop feeling positive emotions and their drive to experiment and learn is stifled.

Via David Hain, Stewart-Marshall
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David Hain's curator insight, May 29, 3:54 AM

A plea for a leadership approach that's more human, because power notions can be illusory, and hubris is never far away...

John Lasschuit ®™'s curator insight, May 30, 7:15 AM

Top-down leadership is outdated, and, more importantly, counterproductive. By focusing too much on control and end goals, and not enough on their people, leaders are making it more difficult to achieve their own desired outcomes.

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A 30-60-90 Day Plan For New Leaders

A 30-60-90 Day Plan For New Leaders | New Leadership | Scoop.it

Leaders new to a team have the unenviable task of getting results, building trust and establishing credibility.  All the while they are learning their new role, and possibly even a new company.

For some leaders, doing one or the other is attainable, but doing all simultaneously can be a daunting task. It can be a delicate balance at times, and giving attention to everything at once can be a bit overwhelming.

Whether the leader is brand new to leadership, or new to their team, or is a seasoned leader in a new company, the ability to quickly establish change can make or break the leader as well as their teams, and possibly the organization.

I have realized over the years that the most effective way for a leader to create results and build culture is to adopt a rolling focus, 30-60-90 day game plan. Here it is in simplified form:

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Five Leadership Lessons that will Help you Boost Productivity  

Five Leadership Lessons that will Help you Boost Productivity   | New Leadership | Scoop.it

Today, businesses are presented with a plethora of opportunities arising from digital transformation. However, not all business leaders know how they can turn such opportunities into tangible value for their organisation. The lingering challenge is how they can drive successful digital transformation strategies to improve productivity and ensure business growth.

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The 2 Cs of management excellence  

The 2 Cs of management excellence   | New Leadership | Scoop.it

What is good management? For years at McKinsey, we have applied science and measurement to that question. Our research has found significant approaches to achieve superior management that spark notable organizational performance and health. They underscore the importance of consistency and coherence, the top characteristics of “good management” in my book.

more...
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Don't be Blind to Opportunity

Don't be Blind to Opportunity | New Leadership | Scoop.it
Why do so many businesses view risk only in terms of threats rather than in terms of opportunity? And how might this outlook impact on them when the most successful companies are increasingly defined by innovation and entrepreneurship?

Via The People Development Network
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How Humble Leadership Really Works

How Humble Leadership Really Works | New Leadership | Scoop.it

When you’re a leader — no matter how long you’ve been in your role or how hard the journey was to get there — you are merely overhead unless you’re bringing out the best in your employees. Unfortunately, many leaders lose sight of this.

Power, as my colleague Ena Inesi has studied, can cause leaders to become overly obsessed with outcomes and control, and, therefore, treat their employees as means to an end. As I’ve discovered in my own research, this ramps up people’s fear — fear of not hitting targets, fear of losing bonuses, fear of failing — and as a consequence people stop feeling positive emotions and their drive to experiment and learn is stifled.

more...
No comment yet.