The New Era of Learning
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The New Era of Learning
The direction in which learning is going: personalized, self-directed, grounded in the real world, and blurring the lines between age groups, teachers/students, formal/informal, etc. It taps into people's instincts and desires for play, creativity and meaning. I'm hoping to eventually incorporate this content into a robust web site that will serve as a compendium on this topic.
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Unshackled and Unschooled: Free-Range Learning Movement Grows

Unshackled and Unschooled: Free-Range Learning Movement Grows | The New Era of Learning | Scoop.it
Most people have heard of homeschooling -- kids are educated by parents or caregivers at home, rather than at school, for a variety of reasons. But within the homeschooling community, the growing "unschooling" subset has a somewhat different, amorphous, definition -- and this movement is growing.
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Steve Hargadon: The Future of Work (and Education)

Steve Hargadon: The Future of Work (and Education) | The New Era of Learning | Scoop.it
Luba Vangelova's insight:

Nice, concise summary of why the societal transformations stemming from the "long tail" effect will reward traits fostered by self-directed learning while simultaneously expanding the opportunities for learners.

   
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The Future of Work (Big Data meets HR, and what it means for education)

The Future of Work (Big Data meets HR, and what it means for education) | The New Era of Learning | Scoop.it

What happens when Big Data meets human resources? The emerging practice of "people analytics" is already transforming how employers hire, fire, and promote. 

Luba Vangelova's insight:

Key takeaways with respect to education:

-- Thanks to "people analytics" (using computer algorithms to extract insights from massive amounts of digital data that's now available about job candidates and workers), the labor market is becoming "fairer to people at every stage of their careers."

 

-- One manifestation of this is that the signaling power (and therefore the value and the necessity) of a college degree is fading, now that employers can easily assess data that far better predicts people's potential. The author writes: "I spoke with managers at a lot of companies who are using advanced analytics to reevaluate and reshape their hiring, and nearly all of them told me that their research is leading them toward pools of candidates who didn’t attend college—for tech jobs, for high-end sales positions, for some managerial roles."

 

-- Instead of evaluating candidates based on how they performed on one-time snapshots taken in the "artificial environment" of a classroom, companies can look at how candidates perform in real-world situations and also review the feedback they receive from others, e.g. by analyzing their ratings in discussion forums.

 

 

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Who dares, plays

Who dares, plays | The New Era of Learning | Scoop.it

"Ms Tan had a hunch that for a younger generation of parents, born in the 1980s, those prejudices in favour of piano-bashing and rote learning might be waning. She believes that these younger pussycat mums might instead appreciate their children learning the creativity, teamwork and problem-solving that, she argues, come from playing with Lego."

Luba Vangelova's insight:

A sign that the tide may be turning against the Tiger Mom phenomenon in Asia? It may tie in with greater prosperity -- the book "Disrupting Class" says poverty (perhaps even the fear of it?) can be a powerful extrinsic motivator that renders the style of education secondary to the end result. But once extrinsic motivators are resolved, one needs intrinsic motivation to learn. Curiosity and the urge to explore (play) are powerful intrinsic motivators.

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