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The Rise of Compassionate Management (Finally)

The Rise of Compassionate Management (Finally) | NeuroScience | Scoop.it

Don’t look now, but all of a sudden the topic of compassionate management is becoming trendy.

A growing number of business conferences are focusing in on the topic of compassion at work. There’s the International Working Group on Compassionate Organizations. There’s the Changing Culture in the Workplace Conference. Then there’s Wisdom 2.0, dedicated to “exploring living with greater awareness, wisdom and compassion in the modern age.” The speakers are no slouches: eBay founder Pierre Omidyar, Bill Ford (yes, that Bill Ford), Karen May (VP of Talent at Google), and Linked In CEO Jeff Weiner top the bill. At TED, Karen Armstrong’s talk about reviving the Golden Rule won the TED prize in 2009 and has given rise to a Charter for Compassion signed by nearly 100,000 people.


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Rescooped by Kate Jenkin from Heal the world
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City living affects your brain, researchers find

City living affects your brain, researchers find | NeuroScience | Scoop.it
The part of the brain that senses danger becomes overactive in city-dwellers when they are under stress (City living affects your brain, researchers find http://t.co/iBxpOD6kBM)...

Via Ruth Obadia
Kate Jenkin's insight:

Very interesting! .... "The brains of people living in cities operate differently from those in rural areas, according to a brain-scanning study. Scientists found that two regions, involved in the regulation of emotion and anxiety, become overactive in city-dwellers when they are stressed and argue that the differences could account for the increased rates of mental health problems seen in urban areas."

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Ruth Obadia's curator insight, August 28, 2013 3:00 PM

The brains of people living in cities operate differently from those in rural areas, according to a brain-scanning study. Scientists found that two regions, involved in the regulation of emotion and anxiety, become overactive in city-dwellers when they are stressed and argue that the differences could account for the increased rates of mental healthproblems seen in urban areas.

Rescooped by Kate Jenkin from Brain Imaging and Neuroscience: The Good, The Bad, & The Ugly
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Why Music Makes Our Brain Sing

Why Music Makes Our Brain Sing | NeuroScience | Scoop.it
When a song triggers both anticipation and reward, it moves us like nothing else.

Via Maggie Rouman, Donald J Bolger
Kate Jenkin's insight:

Another amazing insight into the magic of music.
"We found that listening to what might be called “peak emotional moments” in music — that moment when you feel a “chill” of pleasure to a musical passage — causes the release of the neurotransmitter dopamine, an essential signaling molecule in the brain."

 
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Maggie Rouman's curator insight, June 16, 2013 1:07 PM

"So why does this thingless “thing” — at its core, a mere sequence of sounds — hold such potentially enormous intrinsic value?

The quick and easy explanation is that music brings a unique pleasure to humans. Of course, that still leaves the question of why. But for that, neuroscience is starting to provide some answers."