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How SAP Is Utilizing Machine Learning For Its Enterprise Applications

How SAP Is Utilizing Machine Learning For Its Enterprise Applications | neuro design | Scoop.it
SAP has been harnessing machine learning in its applications lately. To learn more about SAP's machine learning initiatives, I interviewed the head of machine learning at the company, Markus Noga.

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You're 96 Percent Less Creative Than You Were as a Child. Here's How to Reverse That - INC.Com

You're 96 Percent Less Creative Than You Were as a Child. Here's How to Reverse That - INC.Com | neuro design | Scoop.it
If you haven't said it yourself, someone has said it to you: "I'm just not that creative."

Most of us wouldn't mind being just a little more creative. Fortunately, you can. Not only are there proven ways to increase your creativity, but also, according to research, all of us have a creative gene.

In a longitudinal test of creative potential, a NASA study found that of 1,600 4- and 5-year-olds, 98 percent scored at "creative genius" level. Five years later, only 30 percent of the same group of children scored at the same level, and again, five years later, only 12 percent. When the same test was administered to adults, it was found that only two percent scored at this genius level.

According to the study, our creativity is drained by our education. As we learn to excel at convergent thinking--or the ability to focus and hone our thoughts--we squash our instinct for divergent, or generative, thought. The 5-year-old in us never goes away, though. Here are four ways to rediscover your creative genius.

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David W. Deeds's curator insight, January 19, 1:56 AM

Great stuff! Thanks to John Evans. 

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The Human Brain Builds Structures in 11 Dimensions, Discover Scientists

The Human Brain Builds Structures in 11 Dimensions, Discover Scientists | neuro design | Scoop.it
Groundbreaking research finds that the human brain creates multi-dimensional neural structures.

Via Stephania Savva, Ph.D
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, October 26, 2017 4:03 PM
This research-based article points to the wonderful complexity of the human brain and how it processes information.
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The Neuroscience of Narrative and Memory

The Neuroscience of Narrative and Memory | neuro design | Scoop.it
Delivering content—in any class—through a story has positive effects on your students’ information retention.

Via Stephania Savva, Ph.D
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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, September 16, 2017 1:50 PM

Our brain is geared toward understanding through stories, so it makes sense to adapt story telling to academics. -Lon

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Emotional Intelligence Has 12 Elements. Which Do You Need to Work On?

Emotional Intelligence Has 12 Elements. Which Do You Need to Work On? | neuro design | Scoop.it

There are many models of emotional intelligence, each with its own set of abilities; they are often lumped together as “EQ” in the popular vernacular. We prefer “EI,” which we define as comprising four domains: self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, and relationship management. Nested within each domain are twelve EI competencies, learned and learnable capabilities that allow outstanding performance at work or as a leader.

 

These include areas in which Esther is clearly strong: empathy, positive outlook, and self-control. But they also include crucial abilities such as achievement, influence, conflict management, teamwork and inspirational leadership. These skills require just as much engagement with emotions as the first set, and should be just as much a part of any aspiring leader’s development priorities....


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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, February 8, 2017 11:36 PM

Emotional intelligence seems to be in short supply these days. Interesting read from Harvard Business Review.

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How to activate your brain's ability to learn

How to activate your brain's ability to learn | neuro design | Scoop.it
Overlearning, or continuing to train a skill after you've already mastered it, may make it less likely to forget that skill when you acquire new ones.

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Is tech addiction making us far more stressed at work? - BBC News

Is tech addiction making us far more stressed at work? - BBC News | neuro design | Scoop.it
Checking our work emails and social media accounts at all hours of the day is making us more stressed, research suggests, but what can we do about it?
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How language can affect the way we think

How language can affect the way we think | neuro design | Scoop.it

A look at the ways that the construction of language can have implications for the way we think, act and parse the world around us.


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Danielle M. Villegas's curator insight, January 27, 2016 10:55 AM
This is a fascinating article about differences in language, and shows how things can truly be "lost in translation." My husband, a native Spanish speaker and I will have heated debates about English because he's translating in his head, and some expressions he'll claim he's never heard (despite living in this country for almost 35 years), or he'll say they don't make sense. This article explains some of this phenomenon and more. Linguistics are so cool to me! But this article is another reminder that translation alone isn't making something global. The language translation itself can take on deeper or lesser meaning simply because there are no true direct translations. This is important when considering localization with a project. What do you think? Have you encountered this? Include your comments below. --TechCommGeekMom
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Science Proves What Really Makes People Happy

Science Proves What Really Makes People Happy | neuro design | Scoop.it
Many of us would like to know the secret to lasting happiness. Everyone has ideas of course, and not a few of them involve material items. But science might prove that it doesn’t.Dr. Thomas Gilovich, a professor at Cornell University, believes that material items might provide happiness—but it doesn’t last. The problem is as soon as we have the item, we slowly get used to having it. And…eventually, the thrill is gone.I know this first hand. I have written before about my love of fishing lures. A

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Eric_Determined / Eric Silverstein's curator insight, June 12, 2015 2:34 PM

"An important part of Gilovich’s findings is that the experience becomes a part of us; through the stories we tell and share with the other who shared the experience. They become a bond in our personal relationships, a key to happiness for most people. "


The above is the foundation of our mobile solution @SNAPCIOUS, empowering customers to share their visual stories around the brands they love.


Which brand experience have you recently been delighted by?

soundsaves's curator insight, August 3, 2015 5:29 PM

"An important part of Gilovich’s findings is that the experience becomes a part of us; through the stories we tell and share with the other who shared the experience. They become a bond in our personal relationships, a key to happiness for most people. "

 

The above is the foundation of our mobile solution @SNAPCIOUS, empowering customers to share their visual stories around the brands they love.

 

Which brand experience have you recently been delighted by?

 
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What Is The Ideal Length Of A Tweet (And Other Communications)? - Edudemic

What Is The Ideal Length Of A Tweet (And Other Communications)? - Edudemic | neuro design | Scoop.it

"There are so many ways that teachers are using social media –  both in the classroom and for their own professional development. From Instagram   and Facebook in the classroom to Twitter lists and hashtags for their PLN, there are so many social networks and so much content to choose from when you’re looking. You know that whether you’re browsing through your Twitter feed or searching on Pinterest, there are certain things that catch your eye and other things that blend into the background. You pick and choose what looks interesting to you.

 

When you’re the creator of the content, however – either for professional use with other teachers or for student’s consumption – you need to be concerned with getting your message out there in a way that ensures it isn’t the content that is blending into the background. The handy infographic below takes a look at the ideal length for all of your social media postings.  Keep reading to learn more!"


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Kymberley Pelky's curator insight, June 21, 2014 11:25 AM

Great insight for wordy people like me!

Tom Cockburn's curator insight, June 24, 2014 5:49 AM

Of course some types of tweets are best left unposted whatever size they are

Chris Eller's curator insight, June 24, 2014 1:44 PM

This is a topic I, personally, have been wrestling with recently. If you look at many of the forms of communication listed in the infographic, the common denominator is how short our attention span is when consuming online information.


For example, 


  • Video - 3 to 3.5 minutes
  • Presentation (sermon?) - 18 minutes
  • Podcast - 22 minutes
  • Headline - 60 characters


Based on my own informal research at First Family Church, I would have to agree with the the overall consensus of these findings. A common complaint I receive in our Small Group Curriculum Evaluations is that we provide too much information. Consequently, I am looking for ways to break our teaching into even smaller chunks and develop teaching helps (e.g. handouts) that are available by clicking a link rather than including in the formal lesson.


From a church perspective, would it be too frightening to try and evaluate how engaged people are during a 40 to 50 minute sermon? A very informal indication could be how many people are using their phones or mobile devices during a sermon. Yes, they have their Bible on their device, and it is likely they are referring to the digital Bible occasionally, but if someone is staring intently at their phone or tablet for an extended period of time during the sermon, odds are good they have transitioned to something else and are focused on the content on their device rather than actively listening to the sermon.


If you have the courage, try and see how many in your church this Sunday are staring at their mobile devices rather than actively listening to your sermon.


What are your thoughts? Will the church need to adjust its centuries-old method of teaching as the attention span of church attenders shrinks?

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How Personal Emotions Fuel B2B Purchases - Forbes

How Personal Emotions Fuel B2B Purchases - Forbes | neuro design | Scoop.it

Basic/ Digest...

 

In a recent study performed by the CEB, which examined the impact of personal emotions on B2B purchases, it was found that 71% of buyers who see a personal value in a B2B purchase will end up buying the product or service. In fact, personal value had two times the impact on the buyer than business impact did. In short, the survey found that without question personal value, perhaps better read emotional value overwhelmingly outweighed logic and reason in driving purchase decisions.

 

The data in this study shouldn’t come as a surprise to anybody, but what it should do is come as an important reminder to people that the reasons that people buy are usually attached much closer to their emotional center than their rational thinking. And while buyers will often push hard for specifications, data sheets and statistics in order to help them justify a buying decision, more often than not these requests are really their way of telling you that they are not yet seeing the personal value in the product being sold to them.

 

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CYDigital's curator insight, May 11, 2014 11:00 AM

So how to you meet the challenges of emotion? You bake it into your personas!

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6 Ways to Use Analytics to Fine-Tune Mobile Campaigns | Street Fight

6 Ways to Use Analytics to Fine-Tune Mobile Campaigns | Street Fight | neuro design | Scoop.it

Mobile marketing is transforming the path to purchase, as consumers rely more heavily on their smartphones when making all types of purchasing decisions. The question for marketers now isn’t whether they should launch mobile campaigns, but how they can improve the effectiveness of those campaigns going forward.

 

Spending on local mobile display advertising is expected to reach more than $2.74 billion by 2017, and for that kind of money, marketers are expecting to see real results. Using analytics to fine-tune their campaigns, marketers are able build on the success of past mobile marketing efforts and optimize the effects of location targeting. Here are six strategies that marketers can use when fine-tuning their mobile campaigns.

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Will Companies One Day Use Brain Waves to Find Ideal Pricing?

Will Companies One Day Use Brain Waves to Find Ideal Pricing? | neuro design | Scoop.it
A German neuroscientist is measuring brain waves to find out how much people are willing to pay for products like Starbucks coffee

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Beyond Working Hard: What Growth Mindset Teaches Us About Our Brains

Beyond Working Hard: What Growth Mindset Teaches Us About Our Brains | neuro design | Scoop.it
To foster growth mindsets in students, teachers can coach students to try different learning strategies that make the brain work smarter. Educator praise can be used to acknowledge specific strategies students have tried and can push students to reflect on themselves as learners. This process is more complex than it looks and ultimately should help lead students to become more independent thinkers.

Via Nik Peachey
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, January 20, 9:29 AM

Worth a read.

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What the Perception-action Cycle Tells Us About How the Brain Learns

What the Perception-action Cycle Tells Us About How the Brain Learns | neuro design | Scoop.it
Schools can leverage perception-action cycle, the process for acquiring new information, to improve student learning.
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The Neuroscience of Narrative and Memory

The Neuroscience of Narrative and Memory | neuro design | Scoop.it
Delivering content—in any class—through a story has positive effects on your students’ information retention.

Via Stephania Savva, Ph.D
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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, September 16, 2017 1:50 PM

Our brain is geared toward understanding through stories, so it makes sense to adapt story telling to academics. -Lon

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Harnessing the Incredible Learning Potential of the Adolescent Brain | #LEARNing2LEARN #Research

Harnessing the Incredible Learning Potential of the Adolescent Brain | #LEARNing2LEARN #Research | neuro design | Scoop.it
“[Adolescence is] a stage of life when we can really thrive, but we need to take advantage of the opportunity,” said Temple University neuroscientist Laurence Steinberg at a Learning and the Brain conference in Boston. Steinberg has spent his career studying how the adolescent brain develops and believes there is a fundamental disconnect between the popular characterizations of adolescents and what’s really going on in their brains.

Because the brain is still developing during adolescence, it has incredible plasticity. It’s akin to the first five years of life, when a child’s brain is growing and developing new pathways all the time in response to experiences. Adult brains are somewhat plastic as well — otherwise they wouldn’t be able to learn new things — but “brain plasticity in adulthood involves minor changes to existing circuits, not the wholesale development of new ones or elimination of others,” Steinberg said.

 

The adolescent brain is exquisitely sensitive to experience,” Steinberg said. “It is like the recording device is turned up to a different level of sensitivity.” That’s why humans tend to remember even the most mundane events from adolescence much better than even important events that took place later in life. It also means adolescence could be an extremely important window for learning that sticks. Steinberg notes this window is also lengthening as scientists observe the onset of puberty happening earlier and young people taking on adult roles later in life. Between these two factors, one biological and one social, adolescence researchers now generally say the period lasts 15 years between the ages of 10 and 25.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Brain

 

Use #Andragogy UP from 11 years:

 

 https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/05/13/andragogy-adult-teaching-how-to-teach-ict/

 


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Koen Mattheeuws's curator insight, November 5, 2016 7:04 AM
The problem is that many high schools confuse “challenging work” with “amount of work.”
Lon Woodbury's curator insight, February 22, 2017 10:00 AM

It seems like boredom is deadly to the learning process and that's exactly what high school students report is what is happening to them in most schools - The lack of challenge. k-Lon

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The Science Behind What Really Drives Performance (It's Going to Surprise You)

The Science Behind What Really Drives Performance (It's Going to Surprise You) | neuro design | Scoop.it

Imagine you could have a skill where--in any given conversation with colleagues, clients, or subordinates--you could be keenly aware of, and even experience, their feelings and thoughts.

 

Sounds like some X-Men-like psychic superpower right? Well, what if I told you that anyone can have this uncanny ability and use its strength and charm to have successful conversations?

 

Well, you can. The superpower I refer to is called empathy.

 

But this skill--and it is a learned skill available to anyone--is often misunderstood because there are variations of it. I'll get to the science of it shortly.


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Ian Berry's curator insight, February 6, 2017 7:12 PM
Great insights into present day and future leadership. DDI report well worth reviewing too
chris chopyak's curator insight, February 6, 2017 9:37 PM
I will take super powers any day!
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, February 8, 2017 5:05 AM
The Science Behind What Really Drives Performance
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Is tech addiction making us far more stressed at work? - BBC News

Is tech addiction making us far more stressed at work? - BBC News | neuro design | Scoop.it
Checking our work emails and social media accounts at all hours of the day is making us more stressed, research suggests, but what can we do about it?
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Behaviors Are The New Markets!

Behaviors Are The New Markets! | neuro design | Scoop.it
Marketing Strategy - Don't obsessively focus on your marketing channels. Doing so prevents you from focusing on what's most important—your customers' needs.

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Eric_Determined / Eric Silverstein's curator insight, January 29, 2016 11:29 PM

"Finding the right ways to engage with customers today is harder than ever. No longer do we try to get things done in our professional or personal lives using one path—it is far too high-paced and competitive out there to limit our options. And customers are choosing the path of least resistance to get what they need.


Jane Hiscock from Farland Group shares valuable insight from her Omnichannel Strategy recommendation.


CEOs remarked that behaviors are the new markets.


New markets used to be thought of as new geographies like Brazil, Russia, China, or a different demographic.


This is where everything needs to rise and fall. New markets will come by focusing on different customer behaviors.


If we put customer behavior, not just customer at the center, what will that yield that is different?


It will force us to think behavior and intent first, and to consider the ways to engage with that behavior second or third.


In this world of hundreds of channels and ways to engage, one can easily shift from an obsessive focus on products to an obsessive focus on channels and remain blind to the customer.


Forget all of the products and all of the channels, and focus on the customer. Ultimately, what customers want is for their life to be simplified."

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You Have To Earn Your Customer’s Attention!

You Have To Earn Your Customer’s Attention! | neuro design | Scoop.it
What is a picture worth? We have all heard the expression, but is it really that simple? The world has gone mobile. With thousands of smartphones and connected devices, people expect to find what they are looking for in a matter of seconds – and they usually do.

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Eric_Determined / Eric Silverstein's curator insight, August 21, 2015 2:40 AM

What causes our shorter attention span, is it technology?


One thing for sure, our brain processes visuals much faster, plus the right image can create an immediate emotional connection. This is just the beginning, you then need to make sure you have an engagement strategy that offers a rewarding customer experience, while facilitating social conversations. 


Build and nurture your customer relationships. Make it easy for them to become your brand voice. We do it via Mobile.

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Why These Neuroscientists Are Prescribing Video Games

Why These Neuroscientists Are Prescribing Video Games | neuro design | Scoop.it
Video games as therapy? While most virtual reality falls under the category of mindless entertainment, a group of researchers believe the gaming world may offer some benefit to those on the autism spectrum.

A team comprised of cognitive neurosci...

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Lorraine Elvire Wagenaar's curator insight, October 30, 2014 6:20 AM

voeg uw inzicht ...

Frédéric STOJICEVIC's curator insight, October 30, 2014 9:47 AM

Le Serious Game au service de la pharma et de la neuroscience. Interactions sociales personnalisées en fonction des réactions du patient grâce à la reconnaissance faciale.

Critical Thinking at BHCC's curator insight, October 30, 2014 11:16 AM

            This topic shows the benefits of video games today. They help kids with brain injuries or a disorder. They can also help the brain to repair itself after surgery has been done on the brain. Personally, I think that it's great that we have video games. I also think that video games should be at hospitals to help children develop a technological brain, in this sense it means they will learn how to operate technology in their older years

-Clay

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Social Customer Service for Marketeers - Marketing Technology Blog

Social Customer Service for Marketeers - Marketing Technology Blog | neuro design | Scoop.it

Social Customer Service for Marketeers by Douglas Karr on Marketing Technology Blog

 

Customer service IS marketing. I’ll say it again… customer service IS marketing. Because the way you treat your customers is promoted on social media, ratings and reviews every single day, your customer service is no longer an indicator of customer satisfaction, retention or value. Your customers are now a key arm to all of your marketing efforts because they share readily online.+

While Marketing Teams aim to increase brand awareness and lead generation through pushing out information and generating positive engagement, Customer Service Teams aim to improve customer satisfaction and increase customer retention by listening, and responding to customer needs. How the two meet is often seen as a challenge among many organizations. Source: Sentiment

While 60% of companies believe social media is just a marketing channel, they’re ignoring the amplification of their brand through consumer advocates or detractors. All it takes to derail months or years of hard work building trust, authority, and an emotional connection with your audience is mishandling a single event that’s published and promoted on social media. You can recover effectively… but you should never forget that customer service is now a key element of your overall marketing strategy.



Read more: Social Customer Service for Marketeers | Marketing Technology Blog http://www.marketingtechblog.com/social-customer-service-marketing/#ixzz358ZIesFo ;
Under Creative Commons License: Attribution 
Follow us: @mktgtechblog on Twitter | marketingtechnology on Facebook

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What every marketer needs to know about neuromarketing

What every marketer needs to know about neuromarketing | neuro design | Scoop.it
In this guest post, branding expert Dr Peter Steidl says neuromarketing will change the face of marketing, and without it, campaigns will lag behind competitors that have embraced this new way of thinking about consumer behaviour and branding.   I am not talking about lab tests that deliver reliable but limited information about how consumers process marketing stimuli such as ads, logos or package designs.  Rather, I’m referring to the application of neuroscience concepts in a strategic context. In other words, how marketers can benefit from the latest insights into how consumers think, feel and, and most importantly, make purchase…

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Neuromarketing: the final piece of the marketing measurement puzzle?

Neuromarketing: the final piece of the marketing measurement puzzle? | neuro design | Scoop.it
Neuromarketing can level the boardroom playing field for marketers, says Gawain Morrison

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