Co-design, Reflection and Learning
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Free Range Learning. Action Dialogue with Dawn Isaacs, Head of School.

Free Range Learning. Action Dialogue with Dawn Isaacs, Head of School. | Co-design, Reflection and Learning | Scoop.it

Start a Network MINDSET early!  I know you’re leading your school with regards to a deeper dive into experiential education and action research. I find this thrilling. The more younger children are exposed to action research the better, right.

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Facilitative Leadership: Balancing the Dimensions of Success

Facilitative Leadership: Balancing the Dimensions of Success | Co-design, Reflection and Learning | Scoop.it
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Developing learning to learn skills

Developing learning to learn skills | Co-design, Reflection and Learning | Scoop.it
You can develop learning to learn skills, but it's not just by knowing about them, or even sharing the value. You've got to do more!
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How to Practice Active (not Passive) Open-Mindedness

Having an open mind is about more than just being willing to learn new things. It’s about being ready to prove yourself wrong, and learning in the process.
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Drawing Is the Fastest, Most Effective Way to Learn, According to New Research

Drawing Is the Fastest, Most Effective Way to Learn, According to New Research | Co-design, Reflection and Learning | Scoop.it
When was the last time you sat down with a pencil and paper and drew something? For many of us the answer is high school art class or that Paint and Sip evening you went to awhile back. Aside from professionals and a few dedicated hobbyists, few of us make time for sketching, doodling, or any other form of visual art in our lives.

But according to a fascinating new study, the right answer is whenever was the last time you tried to learn anything new. Put away the highlighter (really, science shows they're worse than useless) and skip the flash cards. The fastest way to cram new information into your brain is by drawing it, concludes the research.

Via John Evans, Liz Rykert
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Carlos Fosca's curator insight, November 5, 2018 1:56 AM

La hipótesis de los investigadores es que el dibujo le da a tu cerebro tantas formas diferentes de interactuar con material nuevo: tienes primero que descubrir cómo dibujar imaginándolo en detalle en tu mente, experimentas el sentimiento físico de representar esa idea y luego al final, miras la representación visual de la misma.

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Cross-Sector Community Network Evaluations: Stories of Success Using the PARTNER Tool Webinar - YouTube

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Do Just 1 Thing Differently to Learn Faster and Remember Longer: No Extra Time, Effort, or Technology Required

Do Just 1 Thing Differently to Learn Faster and Remember Longer: No Extra Time, Effort, or Technology Required | Co-design, Reflection and Learning | Scoop.it
You don't even have to change the manner in which you study or practice. You only have to do this.
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FACILITATING A PARTICIPATORY ACTION LEARNING ACTION RESEARCH (PALAR) PROCESS IN A HIGHER EDUCATIONAL CONTEXT 

FACILITATING A PARTICIPATORY ACTION LEARNING ACTION RESEARCH (PALAR) PROCESS IN A HIGHER EDUCATIONAL CONTEXT  | Co-design, Reflection and Learning | Scoop.it
In this paper we talk about our journey as researchers discovering the realities that many of our students face in South Africa and changed how we understand and regard our students.  The evolutionary process involved the gradual chipping away of traditional power relations between lecturers and students.  This was at times unnerving, challenging and took …
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Collective Intelligence | Action Research | Generative Action Research

Collective Intelligence | Action Research | Generative Action Research | Co-design, Reflection and Learning | Scoop.it
Why just "act" when you can learn more from your experience using Generative Action Research that benefits everyone at all scales, from individual to planetary?
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Jerry Michalski on Design from Trust

Jerry Michalski on Design from Trust | Co-design, Reflection and Learning | Scoop.it
"Trust" is one of those words we think we understand, but mostly we don't. In particular, we don't understand the role of trust in designing our institutions.
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Decentralized Collective Learning for Self-managed Sharing Economies –

Decentralized Collective Learning for Self-managed Sharing Economies – | Co-design, Reflection and Learning | Scoop.it
The Internet of Things equips citizens with phenomenal new means for online participation in sharing economies. When agents self-determine options from which they choose, for instance their resource consump- tion and production, while these choices have a collective system-wide impact, optimal decision-making turns into a combinatorial optimization problem known as NP-hard. In such challenging computational…
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The Secret to a Good Retrospective? Actually Having Them! –

The Secret to a Good Retrospective? Actually Having Them! – | Co-design, Reflection and Learning | Scoop.it
Perhaps you’ll understand why, then, if you ask me how to lead a successful retrospective, I will often respond, “By scheduling one.” I’m not being facetious. If you’re actually having retrospectives, you’re already doing better than most.

Scheduling them, unfortunately, is only step one. Step two is integrating what you learn. As I wrote last week, people forget things at an exponential rate. It doesn’t matter how artfully you facilitate your retrospective if you’re not building in time to review what you learned, because you will likely forget all those lessons anyway. If you can’t remember what you learned, you’re not going to have anything to integrate. What’s the point of learning if you’re not integrating those lessons?

Step three (which is actually step one) is aligning around goals and success as a group. If you haven’t aligned around goals and success at the beginning of the project, then how can you assess how well you did? For most groups, the answer is generally that whoever has the power gets to decide. There’s no accountability to actual results, because you haven’t decided as a team what you were aiming for. It’s too easy to rationalize anything as success.
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Retrospective –

Retrospective – | Co-design, Reflection and Learning | Scoop.it
The Retrospective is an opportunity to debrief projects, make meaning of what happened together, and document lessons learned. In its simplest form, the Retrospective captures what went well, what …
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 5 Questions for Deeper Reflection by @DavidGeurin

 5 Questions for Deeper Reflection by @DavidGeurin | Co-design, Reflection and Learning | Scoop.it
Reflection is important for growth. But we have to be intentional about it. Our reflection is meaningless unless we do something with it. It has to change us. Or, it has to help us change directions. Effective people are reflective people.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Merian Yuma's curator insight, November 7, 2018 10:38 AM
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No boring lectures at the Digital Promise Challenge Institute

No boring lectures at the Digital Promise Challenge Institute | Co-design, Reflection and Learning | Scoop.it

I LOVE this - don't you wish all conferences could be this?

 

"1. Learning is not a spectator sport!

You won’t be sitting in neat little rows. Instead, you’ll be fully engaged in an energizing and inspiring learning experience based on fresh ideas. We learn by doing!

2. Learning is not a solo activity!

You will work with a team of people to define and solve a relevant challenge worth giving your full attention, such as: helping your students become expert problem solvers, inspiring your students to love math, and helping them develop empathy.

3. Learning is not a one-way street!

We all need experts, coaches, and mentors to learn, and you’ll have access to some of the best. And, they’ll be just as eager to connect, communicate, and share ideas with you as you are with them."

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Obsessed with impact – towards a systems approach for social change / Inclusive Economy Europe / Blogs - The Broker

Obsessed with impact – towards a systems approach for social change / Inclusive Economy Europe / Blogs - The Broker | Co-design, Reflection and Learning | Scoop.it
Many forms of resistance do not take place in squares. In some cases, people enact the social change they want to see through practical interventions – for instance, by initiating community projects or a social enterprise. While many of these initiatives are laudable, the obsession with measuring their direct impact is distracting us from understanding, and changing, the bigger picture: the systems in which they are embedded.
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BALLE–Racial Equity Change from the Outside In

BALLE–Racial Equity Change from the Outside In | Co-design, Reflection and Learning | Scoop.it
In this article, which inaugurates the Nonprofit Quarterly’s “Racial Equity Change Process” series, Cyndi Suarez presents a detailed case study that highlights the mix of uncomfortable self-reflection and creative breakthroughs one organization experienced over a seven-year period committed to centering racial equity in its work.
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Learning from Mixed Signals in Online Innovation Communities

We study how contributors to innovation contests improve their performance through direct experience and by observing others as they synthesize learnable signals from different sources. Our research draws on a 10-year panel of more than 55,000 individuals participating in a firm-hosted online innovation community sponsoring creative t-shirt design contests. Our data set contains almost 180,000 submissions that reflect signals of direct performance evaluation from both the community and the firm. Our data set also contains almost 150 million ratings that reflect signals for learning from observing the completed work of others. We have three key findings. First, we find a period of initial investment with decreased performance. This is because individuals struggle to synthesize learnable signals from early performance evaluation. This finding is contrary to other studies that report faster learning from early direct experience when improvements are easiest to achieve. Second, we find that individuals consistently improve their performance from observing others’ good examples. However, whether they improve from observing others’ bad examples depends on their ability to correctly recognize that work as being of low quality. Third, we find that individuals can successfully integrate signals about what is valued by the firm hosting the community, not just about what is valued by the community. We thus provide important insights into the mechanisms of how individuals learn in crowdsourced innovation and provide important qualifications for the often-heralded theme of “learning from failures.”


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Craft metrics to value co-production

Craft metrics to value co-production | Co-design, Reflection and Learning | Scoop.it
To assess whether research is relevant to society, ask the stakeholders, say Catherine Durose, Liz Richardson and Beth Perry.
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Why the future of work is learning

Why the future of work is learning | Co-design, Reflection and Learning | Scoop.it
An interview with future of work strategist Heather McGowan, on how organizations can prepare for a future of accelerated change.
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