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Why Even the Worst Bloggers Are Making Us Smarter | Opinion | WIRED

Why Even the Worst Bloggers Are Making Us Smarter | Opinion | WIRED | Networks | Scoop.it
We write the equivalent of 520 million books every day on social media and email. The fact that so many of us are writing — sharing our ideas, good and bad — has changed the way we think. Just as we now live in public, so do we think in public.
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Rescooped by Lennart Björneborn from Knowledge Broker
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Does Thinking Fast Mean You’re Thinking Smarter?

Does Thinking Fast Mean You’re Thinking Smarter? | Networks | Scoop.it
As a society we certainly equate speed with smarts. Think fast. Are you quick-witted? A quick study? A whiz kid? Even Merriam-Webster bluntly informs us that slowness is “the quality of lacking intelligence or quickness of mind.” But we also recognize something counterintuitive about accepting full-stop that people who react faster are smarter. That’s why, even though athletic training improves reaction time, we wouldn’t scout for the next Einstein at a basketball game. Intelligence probably has a lot to do with making fast connections, but it surely has just as much to do with making the right connections.
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The city as network - Social Physics | #dataviz #UrbanFlows

The city as network - Social Physics | #dataviz #UrbanFlows | Networks | Scoop.it
Traditionally, cities have been viewed as the sum of their locations – the buildings, monuments, squares and parks that spring to mind when we think of ‘New York’, ‘London’ or ‘Paris’. In The new science of cities (Amazon US| Amazon UK), Michael Batty argues that a more productive approach is to think of cities in terms of …

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luiy's curator insight, March 23, 2014 8:16 AM

Cities and network analysis.

 

Viewing cities as networks allows us to use the toolbox of network analysis on them, employing concepts such as ‘cores’ and ‘peripheries’, ‘centrality’, and ‘modules’. Batty says that an understanding of how different types of network intersect will be the key that really unlocks our understanding of cities.

 

Cities, like many other types of network, also seem to be modular, hierarchical, and scale-free – in other words, they show similar patterns at different scales. It’s often said that London is a series of villages, with their own centres and peripheries. but the pattern also repeats when you zoom out and look at the relationships between cities. One can see this in the way that London’s influence really extends across Europe, and in the way that linked series of cities, or ‘megalopolises‘, are growing in places such as the eastern seaboard of the US, Japan’s ‘Taiheiyō Belt‘, or the Pearl River Delta in China.

Eli Levine's curator insight, March 23, 2014 12:55 PM

And there you have it.

 

The blue prints for understanding empirically a city, a society, a nation.

Think about it.

Pierre Levy's curator insight, March 24, 2014 9:24 AM

By the way, geographs knew this a long time ago.