NetWonk
282 views | +0 today
Follow
NetWonk
Understanding the Power and Possibilities of Networks
Curated by Seth Cohen
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Seth Cohen from Mentoring & Coaching
Scoop.it!

TED: Ernesto Sirolli: Want to help someone? Shut up and listen! - Ernesto Sirolli (2012)

When most well-intentioned aid workers hear of a problem they think they can fix, they go to work. This, Ernesto Sirolli suggests, is naïve.

Via The People Development Network, Luís Cochofel
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Seth Cohen from Connectivism and Networked Learning
Scoop.it!

A New Paradigm of Knowledge? | Learner Weblog

A New Paradigm of Knowledge? | Learner Weblog | NetWonk | Scoop.it
This entry was posted in Connectivism, Education, Learning, MOOC, Networks, research and tagged Connectivism, creatagogy, digital pedagogy, Education, Learning, Netagogy, Networks, paradigm, peeragogy, technology.
Via suifaijohnmak
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Seth Cohen from 21st Century Information Fluency
Scoop.it!

Howard Rheingold on how the five web literacies are becoming essential survival skills

Howard Rheingold on how the five web literacies are becoming essential survival skills | NetWonk | Scoop.it
The veteran technology commentator argues that a better understanding of how we connect our attention and intentions online can help individuals and society.
Via Dennis T OConnor
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Seth Cohen from The_PLE
Scoop.it!

Stages of Personalized Learning Environments

Stages of Personalized Learning Environments | NetWonk | Scoop.it
This chart provides the three stages of Personalized Learning Environments describing Stage One (Teacher-centered), Stage Two (Teacher and Learners as co-designers) and Stage Three (Learner-centered).
Via Paulo Simões
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Seth Cohen from Social Storytelling
Scoop.it!

You vs. The Data: When to Stop Optimizing and Start Thinking.

You vs. The Data: When to Stop Optimizing and Start Thinking. | NetWonk | Scoop.it

Numbers provide guidance and direction. They help us figure out if we’re doing our jobs correctly and how we can continue to improve. Data is constantly in demand especially from managers and executives. Providing a steady stream of numbers helps executives prioritize objectives and filters down to determine design, copy and feature decisions. This real-time stream helps us not only monitor performance but to act in-flight as opposed to the end of a particular effort or campaign.


But the numbers can also be misleading.



Via Angela Natividad
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Cohen
Scoop.it!

Hadza offer strong new evidence that social networks are a truly ancient, perhaps integral part of the human story.

Hadza offer strong new evidence that social networks are a truly ancient, perhaps integral part of the human story. | NetWonk | Scoop.it
“We found that what modern people are doing with online social networks is what we've always done—not just before Facebook, but before agriculture,” said study co-author James Fowler, professor of political science and medical genetics at the University of California, San Diego, who, with Christakis, has authored a number of seminal studies of human social networks.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Seth Cohen from information analyst
Scoop.it!

7 Tips To Help You Focus In Age of Distraction: Are You Content Fried?

7 Tips To Help You Focus In Age of Distraction:  Are You Content Fried? | NetWonk | Scoop.it

This weekend I'm focusing on information, filtering and meaning overload and useful ways to manage and utilize it. Having said that, there's so much good information, insights and tips in this post, I have to digest it slowly.

 

Beth Kanter has written a great post on this subject, sharing the way she's dealing with it and the 44 people who commented on it have some great things to add to the discussion.

 

Intro:

 

This morning I learned a new word for information overload - content fried from a colleague at the Packard Foundation.    It resonated.

 

I identify with this, here's what really caught my attention:

 

"The biggest difficulty I experience is the shifting from this forward flowing process of consuming, curating, and sense-making of content to learn versus to get something done".

 

****The latter requires a different type of attention and whole new set of information coping skills

 

Howard Rheingold calls this process managing your attention or “Infotention” and it is what he has been teaching in his courses.

 

I’ve been trying to curate content that offers ideas, tips, and resources to get past that ugly feeling of “content fried.” He curated the above mindmap.

 

Manage Your Attention, Not Just Your Time:

 

Don’t just create a to do list, lay it out on daily and weekly schedule, breaking down key tasks of the project to chunks.

 

****But consider the level of concentration and focus that each type of task or chunk requires – and schedule accordingly.

 

My question to you is:

 

What are your challenges? What ways are you drowning or prospering in this area? I'd love to hear from you.

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering "Content Curation, Social Business and Beyond"

 

Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/z84mSv]


Via janlgordon, michel verstrepen
more...
Beth Kanter's comment, January 21, 2012 8:19 PM
Thanks Jan for curating this post. As I mentioned in Facebook, I have really been helped by Bregman's book, 18 MInutes! His techniques are fantastic. The book is written using stories to illustrate is concepts. I've been slowly trying to put them into practice. It takes discipline
janlgordon's comment, January 21, 2012 8:26 PM
Beth Kanter
I am definitely going to get this book - your post is so full of great information and resources - so helpful, thanks.
Beth Kanter's comment, February 16, 2012 4:38 PM
thanks for sharing my post
Scooped by Seth Cohen
Scoop.it!

Building a Well-Networked Organization

Building a Well-Networked Organization | NetWonk | Scoop.it
By understanding the structure of talent networks within companies, managers can foster more effective collaboration.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Cohen
Scoop.it!

How to Become A Social Media Influencer: Ten Small Steps - Forbes

How to Become A Social Media Influencer: Ten Small Steps - Forbes | NetWonk | Scoop.it
A great (short) guide to how you can make a start in developing your skills in social media and social media influence
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Cohen
Scoop.it!

A CEO’s Guide To Social Media In 2012 | Fast Company

A CEO’s Guide To Social Media In 2012 | Fast Company | NetWonk | Scoop.it
Social media doesn’t change the basics of running an organization or its functions. It simply provides a new (and often more efficient) way to deliver on objectives that are as old as mass demonstrations pitting the haves against the have-nots. 
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Seth Cohen from Cooperative Extension Evaluation
Scoop.it!

Best Social Media Metrics: Conversation, Amplification, Applause, Economic Value

Best Social Media Metrics: Conversation, Amplification, Applause, Economic Value | NetWonk | Scoop.it
4 incredible social media metrics help crystallize effectiveness of your SM efforts: Conversation, Amplification, Applause & Economic Value.

Via Sarah Baughman
more...
Sarah Baughman's comment, October 17, 2011 12:30 PM
Great post that also includes a downloadable spreadsheet to calculate these metrics. Good stuff.
Rescooped by Seth Cohen from Entrepreneurs and beyond
Scoop.it!

Coupa Cafe: Where Startups Meet, Work And Test Products

Coupa Cafe: Where Startups Meet, Work And Test Products | NetWonk | Scoop.it

Coupa Cafe, where tech entrepreneurs and investors work and meet, is an early tester of new startups in Silicon Valley.

 

Read full article here: [http://onforb.es/vaDi9A]


Via axelletess, janlgordon
more...
janlgordon's comment, November 29, 2011 1:19 PM
This is exciting, thanks for sharing!
Rescooped by Seth Cohen from Mentoring & Coaching
Scoop.it!

33 HBR Blog Posts You Should Read Before 2013

33 HBR Blog Posts You Should Read Before 2013 | NetWonk | Scoop.it
From innovation to finding meaningful work, the topics that most preoccupied our authors and readers.

Via Pedro Barbosa, Luís Cochofel
more...
Mary Dantes's comment, December 31, 2012 3:40 PM
I'm following you. Follow me too.
Diana Teixeira de Carvalho's comment, January 3, 2013 6:02 AM
Really important insights here :)
Luís Cochofel's comment, January 3, 2013 5:25 PM
Thanks, Mary and Diana! Have a great 2013!
Rescooped by Seth Cohen from 21st Century Information Fluency
Scoop.it!

Internet Minute Infographic

Internet Minute Infographic | NetWonk | Scoop.it
Network infrastructure as a topic lacks the sex appeal of slick mobile devices, cool social and location apps, streaming music or viral videos.
Via Dennis T OConnor
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Seth Cohen from The_PLE
Scoop.it!

Information aggregation in Networked Learning: The Human Factor and Serendipity

Abstract:

The Web is changing and emergent technologies on the Web provide new options for learners to aggregate and engage with information. Learners can take control over their information steam and be proactive in the search for valuable information. The abundance of information makes that choices need to be made about what is valuable and what not, while the low level of teacher presence on open online networks increases the self-directed nature of this task for learners. Learning technologists started the research, design and development of personal learning environments (PLEs) that include predictive technologies to aid learners with the management of their learning in an open networked environment. Designers and developers are working on information recommender systems, using learning analytics and visualization techniques, to present learners with information relevant to their learning. Questions are being raised, however, about the usefulness of these systems for the advancement of learning. The low level of teacher presence on open networked learning networks will influence the level of reflection and critical engagement with information by learners, and is seen as a challenge to depth of learning. It is argued that to counter balance this, critical factors in information gathering would be the level of serendipity and human mediation.
This paper will highlight some challenges and opportunities in the shaping of information streams effective to learning. The aim of our research was to find out how people might position themselves at the centre of their information gathering process and how microblogging tool Twitter, in combination with RSS, shaped by human connections and interactions, might provide them with a reflection-inducing stream of information, in order to at times surprise and challenge them. We will highlight these aspects through the lens of research carried out during a Massive Open Online Course on Personal Learning Environments Networks and Knowledge (PLENK2010) in the fall of 2010.
This paper will use a small case-study in the use of Twitter on PLENK2010 to investigate how human interaction might aid the increase of levels of serendipity in open networked learning. Special consideration will be given to serendipity in algorithm-based recommender systems for learning.

 

http://www.networkedlearningconference.org.uk/abstracts/pdf/kop.pdf


Via Paulo Simões
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Cohen
Scoop.it!

Curators Key Requirement: Critical Thinking | Content Curation World

Curators Key Requirement: Critical Thinking | Content Curation World | NetWonk | Scoop.it
Robin Good: Critical thinking is a key strategic skill needed by any serious professional curator.  "Critical thinking provides the keys for our own intellectual independence..." and it helps to move away from "rashy conclusions, mystification and...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Seth Cohen from Social Media Content Curation
Scoop.it!

The New York Times Launches Deep Dive: Experimental Context Engine And Story Explorer | Nieman Lab

The New York Times Launches Deep Dive: Experimental Context Engine And Story Explorer | Nieman Lab | NetWonk | Scoop.it

Thinking about the sheer volume of information — stories, images, videos, data — available from The New York Times can evoke a simultaneous glee and terror.

It is simply impossible for readers to see them all.

 

The task for beta620, the Times experimental projects group, launched Deep Dive that uses the Times’ massive cache of metadata from stories to go, as the name suggests, deeper into a news event by pulling together related articles. So Deep Dive would provides readers a collection of stories relating to a topic, based on whatever person, place, event or topic of their choosing.

 

What’s interesting about Deep Dive? At least three things:

1) Deep Dive relies on the extensive tagging system the Times uses for all its stories and makes the Times Topics pages possible. As part of the editing flow tags are applied to stories by editors or producers, with suggestions provided by an internal algorithm. Deep Dive looks for connections among topics.

 

2) Deep Dive’ unique interfact, where the related articles flow into the same frame as the main story when selected. You need never leave the page; jumping backwards or forwards in articles all happens in the same space. That’s a departure from the pageview-driven way most news sites are designed. But Deep Dive’s UI matches its underlying thesis: that individual articles are really pieces of a larger story, told in pieces over time and across bylines and datelines.

 

3) More interesting, Deep Dive will also allows users to save their “dives,” which would be constantly updated with new articles. What Deep Dives promises is an alert more directly based around a specific developing story.

 

But beyond those elements, the real promise of Deep Dive, though, is that it continues to show the Times’ flexibility in providing different ways for different kinds of readers to access its content...

 

read full article http://j.mp/x2SoPf 
 

visit also http://beta620.nytimes.com/projects/deep-dive/ 

and read here:  http://beta620.nytimes.com/projects/deep-dive/exploring-stories-with-deep-dive/  

Curated by Giuseppe Mauriello


Via Giuseppe Mauriello
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Cohen
Scoop.it!

Best Practices for Content Curation for Nonprofits at Social Media for Nonprofits Conference

Best Practices for Content Curation for Nonprofits at Social Media for Nonprofits Conference | NetWonk | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Cohen
Scoop.it!

Rethinking Information Diversity in Networks | Facebook

Rethinking Information Diversity in Networks | Facebook | NetWonk | Scoop.it
A great new post from the Facebook Data Team titled Rethinking Information Diversity in Networks. Read the full text here....
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Cohen
Scoop.it!

New study details Facebook sharing habits

New study details Facebook sharing habits | NetWonk | Scoop.it


Using data from  253.2 million users, Facebook found some interesting patterns in the way people share information on the social network....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Cohen
Scoop.it!

Social Investors Seek New Niche Networks | Adweek

Social Investors Seek New Niche Networks | Adweek | NetWonk | Scoop.it
Investors, users and, more importantly, advertisers are on a constant hunt for The Next Big Thing. With LinkedIn trading publicly and Facebook’s IPO around the corner, it’s no surprise cool hunters are hungry for another big social play.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Seth Cohen from Network Economy
Scoop.it!

What a real Network looks like – Thanks Valdis Krebs

What a real Network looks like – Thanks Valdis Krebs | NetWonk | Scoop.it

What does a real network look like? If we know then we can see if the networks we seek to design and grow are real. Here is how Valdis Krebs sees them and he is for me the Gold Standard.


Via Rob Paterson
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Seth Cohen from Social Networks: The science behind them
Scoop.it!

MIT tests how healthy behaviors spread in a social network - The Boston Globe

MIT tests how healthy behaviors spread in a social network - The Boston Globe | NetWonk | Scoop.it
You might think that people’s tendency to be friends with others who are like them -- “birds of a feather, flock together” -- limits their exposure to ideas and information.
Via BrainHealth
more...
No comment yet.