NEPAD CAADP Compendium on Agriculture in Africa
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First meeting of the steering committee and experts of the Continental High Speed Rail Dakar

RAIL NETWORK 
Brenda Nglazi Zulu's insight:

The first meeting of the steering committee and experts of the Continental High Speed Rail Network project opened on Monday 25 September in Dakar, with the aim of sharing the experiences of member countries while waiting for the feasibility study. 

The two-day meeting of the coordination mechanism for this project is an initiative of the NEPAD Agency, in the framework of the African Union's Agenda 2063, which is the main continental strategy for regional integration through the provision of infrastructure. 

“The Continental High Speed Rail Network project is backed by a long-term vision that has a draft action plan and an institutional framework, a general framework in which several actions have been carried out since 2015,” remarked Louis Napo, Advisor on the High Speed Train project at the NEPAD Agency. 

An overall feasibility study of the project needs to be developed in order to proceed to the implementation phase. 

“However, this initiative will not start from scratch as several countries are engaged in similar projects, wherein some are still in the planning phase,” said Adama Deen, Senior Advisor to the CEO, and Project Manager, Continental High Speed Railway Project, at the NEPAD Agency. 

The first session of the meeting was devoted to presentations on the experiences of Senegal, South Africa and Morocco, the latter two countries considered to be the most advanced in this field, which can inspire other countries on the continent. The presentations by officials of railway companies in Senegal, South Africa and Morocco were followed by questions and comments, in order to inspire the best strategy possible for the project of the Continental High Speed Railway Network.

Adama Deen then went back on the actions taken before stressing the need to develop a study and a pilot project, which would involve taking charge of points relating to the cost of the project, its viability on how to deploy it through the continent and the choice of technology.

 “The funding strategy is also a key success factor, of the project's business case. The Study would therefore be exploring the quantification of 3 key viability factors: the strategic equity and strategic debt required, as well as, the multiple revenue streams, to make the first 10-Year Implementation Plan, and the first country- regional pilot project viable, for implication by 2023,” Mr Deen added. 

"In essence, we have a target to reach 20% network development by 2023; hence, we will working with "willing and ready" countries, and their respective regional economic communities, to define the first set of regional HSR pilot projects, Mr Deen further said. "Starting in 2018, we can have a clearer idea of what we want," he added, “For which viable and solid decisions must be taken, allowing the project to move forward.” 


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Golden opportunity for investment in the sweet potato value chain

This article talks about sweet potato farming 
Brenda Nglazi Zulu's insight:
 A NEW Investment Guide for CARIFORUM Countries 

 Compiled by Adelle Roopchand, CTA(ACP-EU)  

Agriculture is often perceived as a risky sector for investors and banks are generally reluctant to lend to farmers due to their lack of understanding of the sector and associating it with high risk. However, in recent years various types of innovative financial instruments are being introduced by governments, donors, impact investors and others to make finance more easily available to farmers.

 The Caribbean and global demands for sweet potato can be met once financial institutions diversify its services to the micro, small-medium enterprises (MSMEs) in the region. A new financial publication, “ Investment Guide for the Sweet Potato Sector in the Caribbean”, outlines the benefits and challenges in the sector and provides possible solutions for the both the farmers and financial institutions. The investment guide was written by Dr Basil Springer and developed through the partnership of the Finance Alliance for Sustainable Trade (FAST) and the Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation (CTA) ACP-EU with financial support from the Intra-ACP Agricultural Policy Programme (APP).

 It highlights the investment potential in the CARIFORUM region’s growing agribusiness sector, with increasing global demand for tubers, added value of cultivating the crop, and the governments’ efforts to promote production and value addition. CARIFORUM (Caribbean Forum of the African, Caribbean and Pacific Group of States) countries in the Caribbean comprises Antigua and Barbuda, the Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Cuba, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname and Trinidad and Tobago. 

The investment guide was developed to explore three different streams, the macro economic profile of the Caribbean; the sweet potato value chain; and the creation of a favourable environment for investment.
 The following are the key messages outlined in the new guide:
 1. It explores innovative financial instruments available for the sweet potato value chain in the Caribbean to mitigate risks and take advantage of the fast growing investment potential in the sector;
 2. Call for greater reliance on domestically produced fresh or processed sweet potato rather than imports;
 3. More investment in technology needed to enhance sustainability, increase productivity and boost profits in the Caribbean sweet potato sector;
 4. The sweet potato sector in the Caribbean provides many investment opportunities in boosting productivity, enhancing production processes and generating and marketing multiple products;
 5. The Sweet potatoes is a drought tolerant crop actively promoted to mitigate climate stress; 
6. With better access to finance Caribbean farmers could benefit from the growing demand for sweet potatoes in the lucrative UK, US, and EU markets;
 7. Growing the export market for sweet potatoes in the Caribbean will heavily depend on support for investment from financial institutions and the efficient management of the value chain;
 8. Access to affordable finance is the most critical constraint that inhibits the growth of the sweet potato sector in the CARIFORUM region. 
 The Guide also highlights that the Caribbean region has the right qualities to promote growth and investment in the sweet potato. These qualities include:
 a) Favourable climate for investment; 
 b) Favourable climate conditions;
 c) Import substitution in the region; 
 d) Potential Export-Ready Countries; 
 e) Sweet-potato value chain management; 
f) The sweet potato sector represents a promising business opportunity; 
 g) The sweet potato sector offers investment opportunities for the short, medium and long term; 
 h) Sweet potato as a climate stress resilient crop; and 
 i) Timely access to appropriate finances is key. 
CARIFORUM governments to reap the benefits of the growing demands in the sector, by implementing plans for diversifying the agricultural investment initiatives to provide access to finance by the farmers to improve their production capacity and acquire necessary inputs. Hence, the financial institutions will also have an opportunity to expand its services in the agri-sector to include all aspects along the sweet potato value chain (from the farms to forks).
 It is, therefore, a much-needed business innovation and creation within CARIFORUM government and financial institutions to address a smart-finance opportunity in the region. The FAST President and CEO Noemí Perez said, “This Guide provides practical information to financial services providers (FSPs) that wish to invest in the sweet potato sector in the Caribbean. FAST hopes that, with the right information, more and more FSPs can tailor their financial products and services to the growing demand in the agricultural sector.” 
The sweet potato is a drought-tolerant crop which harvest takes some five to six months, and as with most agri-sector commodity the process to secure financing delays the cycle for production which also includes export in a timely manner.
The Guide also identifies the Beauregard variety of sweet potato [orange fleshed sweet potato] as a preferred choice of consumers which is highly nutritious. 
Due to the variety together with proper agronomic practices and favourable weather and soil conditions, it highly resistant to pest and diseases and has a shorter production time of three times more harvest annually to that of other varieties [over 400 varieties of sweet potato globally]. 

The CARICOM’s Caribbean Agricultural Research and Development Institute (CARDI) has produced proper practice guidelines for sweet potato which have been used successfully in Jamaica and Saint Vincent and the Grenadines. The CTA Director Michael Hailu added, “Access to finance is one of the critical challenges that small-scale producers across the Caribbean and other regions where we work face in modernising their operations and reap greater benefit from farming. We hope the investment Guide will help in attracting badly needed finances to the regions’ promising sweet potato sector.” A noteworthy aspect of the guide is that it discusses challenges and identifies favourable conditions or potentials within the value chain. It summarises that for outstanding production and export values, technical aspect must be carefully addressed. Such was the lesson learnt from these CARIFORUM countries as the Dominican Republic, Jamaica and Saint Vincent and the Grenadines. 

However, more attention needs to focus on the management of value chains and business systems as the industry expands. It identifies additionally the need for ‘coordination of the value chain stakeholders, improvement of productivity and access to technology’ as challenges faced by the sector. Interesting Facts about Sweet Potato from the Investment Guide: 
• The leaves, shoots and root are edible
; • Sweet potato vines also provide the basis for a high-protein animal feed;
 • It has a high starch content and is well suited to processing;
 • It has become an important source of raw material for starch and starch-derived industrial products;
 • Added value includes a variety of products and ingredients made from the sweet potato root, including flour, dried chips, juice, bread, noodles, candy and pectin. 
 • New products include liquors and anthocyanin pigments from purple varieties for use in food colouring and in the cosmetics industry.
 • It is an excellent linkage with the livestock and cosmetics industries and can be another way to mitigate the risks of investments as the product portfolio diversifies. 

For more information on the sweet potato investment guide, please visit: http://www.cta.int/en/news/investing-in-caribbean-agriculture.html info@fastinternational.org 
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NEPAD to Implement a Gender Focused Climate Change Programme

 

By Chris Kakunta

The New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD) needs about US $ 83 million dollars to support a five year Gender, Climate Change Agriculture Support Programme (GCCASP) that will take special interests of women and youths in mitigating and coping up with climatic changes.

The GCCASP which will be implemented in Cameroon, Ethiopia, Malawi, Niger and Rwanda is a project within CAADP and Gender Programs of NEPAD aimed at effectively delivering on its intended results, there is need to take into consideration the cross-cutting issues of gender and climate change.

According to Edna Kalima, Programme Officer under NEPAD’s Gender, Climate Change Agriculture Support Programme (GCCASP),the project has been initiated to counter the gender imbalances vulnerable groups like women and youths face despite the critical role they play in the agricultural sector.

Ms. Kalima disclosed this during her presentation to the two day GCCASP meeting held in Lusaka between 8 and 9th September 2015.

Ms. Kalima said the funds will be sourced from multinational donors and managed by NEPAD at the Continental level, through the trust pool fund that NEPAD will establish. At national level resource mobilisation activities are also being conducted for the implementation of the programme. The NEPAD Agency will fill the gaps of what countries are mobilising from the trust pool fund.  She emphasised on the need for the countries to continue engaging development partners on resource mobilisation.

Ms. Kalima noted that the programme is deliberately targeting women because they produce between 60 to 80percent of food in most developing countries and are responsible for half of the world's total food production but are disproportionately affected by the threats posed by climate change and climate variability.

 In recognition of this role and the threats faced by vulnerable farming groups, the GCCASP was developed by the NEPAD Agency with support from NORAD to support efforts of women smallholder farmers and their institutions like women groups and farmers organizations in increasing their productivity, improve on the quality of their commodities and gain a voice in decision making around all aspects of the agriculture value chain from production to marketing. 

In the participating countries, women-specific technical support initiatives will be made available to support women farmers as well as their organizations.

The support will go towards closing up institutional gaps, capacity building of women small holder farmers, creation and strengthening of women platforms and investments in upscaling of successful and innovative practices.

The Norwegian government which has been instrumental in funding climate change related programmes in many African countries including Zambia noted that the demand for food will increase by as much as 50 percent by the year 2030 compared to the current needs.

According to Kari Thorsen, from the Norwegian Embassy who was representing the Norwegian Development Agency (NORAD) at the GCCASP meeting held in Lusaka indicated that the increased critical challenge of food security, climate change will affect women more than anyone else.

Ms. Thorsen said the GCCASP responds well to the new Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) one which talks about combating climate change and its impact as well as number two which strives to end hunger, achieve food security, improve nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture.

Under the Farmer Input Support Programme (FISP) being implemented by the Zambian Government in the Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock, there are gender disparities that have been identified by government in terms of input distribution.

Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Gender and Child Development Daisy Ng’ambi who was represented by Director of Planning and Information Victor Mbumwai said the FISP programme has not fully met the national and regional benchmarks on gender despite statistical data proving that women small scale farmers account for about 60 percent of the food produced and consumed at house level.

Speaking when she officially opened the GCCASP meeting in Lusaka, Ms. Ng’ambi said although there has been an increasing resource commitment to the FISP, access to farmer inputs is still dominated by male households.

Meanwhile, Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA) Secretary General Sindiso Ngwenya  has said the severity of the effects of climate change and variability continues to negatively affect performance of critical economic sectors of Africa. Climate change is undermining Africa’s economic and sustainable development efforts, but most importantly, its impacts will be felt by the poor and vulnerable in societies who do not have climate risk management strategies. 

Mr. Ngwenya, who was represented by Ms. Mekia Mohammed Redi said several studies show that agriculture, energy and forestry, sectors that majority of Africa population depend upon for their livelihoods have been negatively impacted upon by climate change. 

For example, he said, severe droughts, high temperatures and flooding have reduced yields of staple crops, diminished livestock productivity and led to loss of arable land deforestation and forest degradation.

“Climate change alone is estimated to increase the number of undernourished people to between 40 million and 170 million, although impacts may be mitigated by socio-economic development,” he said. 

He noted that climate change will also affect progress towards several of the development goals including poverty reduction, sanitization, environmental sustainability, and access to water.

Ngwenya said: “Climate change is again expected to particularly affect resource-poor households unable to invest in or take advantage of alternative income sources or new agricultural strategies, and less able to recover following droughts, floods, diseases or other shocks. Resource-poor households and communities in marginal areas dependent on rain fed agriculture will be particularly affected by the effects of climate change and variability.” 

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Climate change a threat to agriculture development - Lubunda | Lusaka Star

Climate change a threat to agriculture development - Lubunda | Lusaka Star | NEPAD CAADP Compendium on Agriculture in Africa | Scoop.it

AGRICULTURE and Livestock minister Given Lubinda says changing climate is a threat to the agriculture sector and general household livelihood.

Mr. Lubinda said this in a speech read on his behalf by Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock permanent secretary David Shamulenge during the official opening of a three day Climate Smart Agriculture Regional Policy Dialogue at Intercontinental Hotel to discuss adaptation and mitigation strategy to a changing climate.

Mr. Lubinda said climate smart-agriculture is a pathway towards national development and food and nutrition security built on three pillars.

“These three pillars are increasing productivity and income, enhancing resilience of livelihoods and ecosystems, and reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the atmosphere,” he said.

Mr. Lubinda further said with the changing climate, climate-smart farming practices need to respond to different local conditions, geography, weather and the natural resource base.
He also noted that farmers would continue experiencing diminishing returns on their investments without climate smart agriculture.

"Sadly, they will have to sell off their meagre physical assets that they own; and as such, they will ultimately fail to feed their families,” Mr. Lubinda sympathized with the farmers.

Mr. Lubinda elaborated that Africa needed knowledge, technological innovation, responsive action and strategic partnerships in order for the continent to achieve its adaptation to climate change and variability.

"We need to develop networks and platforms where farmers, policy makers, researchers, the private sector, extension workers and civil society organizations are linked together in joint learning and knowledge exchange,” he explained.

Meanwhile, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN) board chairman, Argent Chuulu has charged that climate change has never been more urgent in Africa than it is today.

Mr. Chuulu said “the dialogue could not be timelier as it is taking place three months before the 21st Conference of the Parties (COP21) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in Paris, France in December 2015.

"I am excited, because as Africa we have a chance to seize the moment to demand a strong agreement at COP21 that will ensure that the deal that comes out of Paris is a deal that works for our farmers and rewards their efforts,” he added.

He further said the dialogue offered Africa and climate smart agriculture stakeholders and champions a unique opportunity to concretise a unified African position on agriculture ahead of the COP 21.

The dialogue which started on 26th August will come to an end today - 28th August 2015.

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African countries urged to embrace smart agriculture - Zambia Daily MailZambia Daily Mail

African countries urged to embrace smart agriculture - Zambia Daily MailZambia Daily Mail | NEPAD CAADP Compendium on Agriculture in Africa | Scoop.it

KABANDA CHULU, Lusaka
AFRICAN countries must embrace climate smart agriculture practices if the continent is to attain food security and nutrition in the face of climate change, says New Partnership for African Development (NEPAD) Director of Programmes Estherine Fotabong.
Climate Smart Agriculture (CSA) is a practice of agriculture that sustainably increases productivity, resilience and adaptation, as well as contributing towards reducing the emission of greenhouse gases.
During the launch of the Africa Climate-Smart Agriculture Alliance, which is the first continental platform following the 2014 Malabo Declaration for mainstreaming climate change in agriculture, Ms Fotabong said African countries must build capacity at all levels, especially for smallholder farmers and institutions in order to attain the goal of 25 million African farmers practising climate-smart agriculture by 2025.
According to a statement released yesterday by the NEPAD Secretariat, Ms Fotabong, who was speaking in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, said the Africa CSA alliance needs to recognise interventions that respond to both the challenges and opportunities that climate change brings.
“In order to make rural transformation attainable, climate change needs to also be mainstreamed in the Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Programme (CAADP), which is Africa’s instrument for agricultural growth and economic development,” she stated.
Officiating at the launch, Ethiopian State Minister for Agriculture, Sileshi Getahun stated that Africa CSA Alliance provides an opportunity to take concrete action in climate change for the benefit of African agriculture.
Minister for Women, Children and Youth Affairs, Zenevu Tadesse called on governments, civil society and the private sector to support local systems and expand to scale up climate-smart agriculture.
And Minister Councillor Tove Stub of the Norwegian Embassy in Addis Ababa, emphasised that Africa CSA Alliance is an important milestone following the 2014 Malabo Declaration in dealing with the challenges of climate change for the benefit of smallholder farmers.
At the 31st African Union Summit (Malabo, Equatorial Guinea, June 2014), the heads of State and Government were clear in their resolve to commit to action on the agriculture-climate change nexus issue.

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Times of Zambia | ‘Climate change affecting nutrition, food security’

Times of Zambia | ‘Climate change affecting nutrition, food security’ | NEPAD CAADP Compendium on Agriculture in Africa | Scoop.it

By VANESSA MALINDI and  ADRIAN MWANZA -
AGRICULTURE and Livestock Minister Given Lubinda has said extreme climate change is affecting nutrition and food security in the region as well as economic growth.
Mr Lubinda said climate change was having adverse effects on the continent’s food and nutrition security status and the livelihoods of people in rural areas.
He said in a speech read for him by his Permanent Secretary David Shamulenge during the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN) regional policy dialogue in Lusaka yesterday.
He said climate change was threatening agriculture and the livelihood of many households in Zambia and Africa at large.
“There is need to develop climate smart agriculture as an adaptation and mitigation strategy to the changing climate,” Mr Lubinda said.
Climate smart agriculture was a pathway towards agricultural development, food and nutrition security which is aimed at increasing productivity and income.
Climate smart agriculture increased productivity in a sustainable manner and aimed at achieving the national food security and development goals.
Mr Lubinda said despite the adverse effects of extreme climate on production, Africa held enormous potential if the right agricultural policies were adopted and funded.
“Despite the adverse effects of extreme climate on agriculture the continent holds enormous potential if the right policies are adopted,” he said.
Recent experiences and studies on climate smart agriculture shows that there are no one size fits to all solutions. In this regards, climate smart agriculture practices needs to respond to different conditions to geography and other social dynamics.
FANRPAN board chairperson, Argent Chuula said the threat of climate change was a threat today more than ever before as climate change had negative implications in Africa on areas such as food security and economic development.
“According to the Fifth Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), projections are that under medium scenarios many areas in Africa will exceed a two degree Celsius. This increase by the last two decades of this century will have big ramifications for agriculture and farmers’ livelihoods,” Mr Chuula said.
He said FANRPAN dialog would table issues such as favourable policies for climate smart agriculture, innovations and technology as well as finding ways of communicating climate smart agriculture to policy makers and farmers.
He commended Government for welcoming FANRPAN and hosting the Policy Dialogue Climate Smart Agriculture which could steer agricultural research and development into global efforts to advance Africa’s food and nutrition security.

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Strengthening ties with private sector in Japan

The New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD) has called for “intelligent partnerships" with Japan’s private sector that will be anchored on the principle of mutual benefit.

 

Chief Executive Officer of NEPAD Dr Ibrahim Mayaki was speaking at the inaugural Japan-Africa Business Forum took place in Tokyo this week. The Forum was jointly organised by the African Diplomatic Corps, the African Development Bank, the Nikkei Business Planning and Editorial Centre and the Government of Japan.

 

The Forum which took place on June 10 and 11 brought together the private sector from African countries and Japan. Its aim is to encourage collaboration on various development priorities in Africa.

 

Dr Ibrahim Mayaki cautioned that while there continues to be a lot of satisfaction over registered economic growth in Africa, leaders are cautious not to become too excited by these impressive growth rates.

 

While in Japan, Dr Mayaki and Senior Vice President of the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA), Mr Hideaki Domichi signed a Memorandum of Understanding, to strengthen cooperation in infrastructure and agriculture development. Priority areas of cooperation will focus on the implementation and monitoring of the Programme for Infrastructure Development in Africa (PIDA), in particular project preparation and evaluation.

 

PIDA is a strategic framework for the development of regional and continental infrastructure in the sectors of Energy, Transport, Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) and Trans-boundary Water, so as to better connect and integrate the continent.

 

NEPAD and Japan will work together on capacity development for the Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Programme (CAADP) and joint cooperation on JICA’s initiatives in agriculture, such as the Coalition for Africa Rice Development (CARD), within the CAADPframework.

 

CARD is a consultative group of bilateral donors and international organisations working in collaboration with rice-producing African countries. Its goal is to support the efforts of African countries to double rice production on the continent to 28 million tons per annum by 2018.

 

Institutional support and strengthened coordination between JICA and the NEPAD through cooperation such as dispatching JICA experts to NEPAD Agency was also discussed.

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NEPAD to roll out projects worth billions -

NEPAD to roll out projects worth billions - | NEPAD CAADP Compendium on Agriculture in Africa | Scoop.it
The New Partnership for Africa’s’ Development (NEPAD) says projectsaligned in the next ten years will not only ensure a dynamic and robust agricultural sector but also  contributes to growth and reduction of food insecurity in Africa. Speaking in an interview over the week, the head of Nepad Martin Bwalya, said the agency has projects in […
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Ghana News - Invest in irrigation systems- Vegetable Producers appeal to gov't

Ghana News - Invest in irrigation systems- Vegetable Producers appeal to gov't | NEPAD CAADP Compendium on Agriculture in Africa | Scoop.it
The Administrative Manager for Vegetable Producers and Exporters Association of Ghana (VEPEAG) Victor Flow-Mensah says the only way to boost vegetable production in Ghana is to invest more in small scale irrigation systems.
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Gladson Makowa's curator insight, June 9, 2014 8:06 AM

In the first place we need vegetables exporters or an organisation of that nature in Malawi. Our vegetables are eaten locally. As a result we have circles of season of plenty when there is oversupply of vegetables and farmers become dis appointed. Following farmers disappointment comes the season of low supply of vegetables when the prices go up. Farmers are not willing to spend much on irrigation in seasons when which needs a lot of inputs because of uncertainties of markets. To prove this grow your on Tomato and see how you suffer from  blood pressure when they are getting ripe and you have no markets. 

 

Thanks to the new tomato varieties that have longer shelf life. 

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Ghana News - Japanese government approves grant for Ghanaian farmers

Ghana News - Japanese government approves grant for Ghanaian farmers | NEPAD CAADP Compendium on Agriculture in Africa | Scoop.it
The Japanese government has approved a grant that will provide farmers with agricultural machinery and materials.
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Ghana News - African Fisheries Ministers meet in Addis Ababa

Ghana News - African Fisheries Ministers meet in Addis Ababa | NEPAD CAADP Compendium on Agriculture in Africa | Scoop.it
African Ministers in charge of Fisheries and Aquaculture yesterday gathered at the African Union Commission offices for the second edition of the Conference of African Ministers of Fisheries and Aquaculture.
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The Zambian Analyst: Spending On Agriculture up 7% After CAADP Launch

The Zambian Analyst: Spending On Agriculture up 7% After CAADP Launch | NEPAD CAADP Compendium on Agriculture in Africa | Scoop.it
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Africa on the way to realising 4.4pc growth in agriculture

Africa on the way to realising 4.4pc growth in agriculture | NEPAD CAADP Compendium on Agriculture in Africa | Scoop.it
By Judith Akolo

Africa is on the way to realising the 4.4 per cent growth in Agriculture per annum as envisaged in the formation of the Comprehensi
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Golden opportunity for investment in the sweet potato value chain

This article talks about sweet potato farming 
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Brenda Nglazi Zulu's curator insight, July 26, 2017 1:23 AM
 A NEW Investment Guide for CARIFORUM Countries 

 Compiled by Adelle Roopchand, CTA(ACP-EU)  

Agriculture is often perceived as a risky sector for investors and banks are generally reluctant to lend to farmers due to their lack of understanding of the sector and associating it with high risk. However, in recent years various types of innovative financial instruments are being introduced by governments, donors, impact investors and others to make finance more easily available to farmers.

 The Caribbean and global demands for sweet potato can be met once financial institutions diversify its services to the micro, small-medium enterprises (MSMEs) in the region. A new financial publication, “ Investment Guide for the Sweet Potato Sector in the Caribbean”, outlines the benefits and challenges in the sector and provides possible solutions for the both the farmers and financial institutions. The investment guide was written by Dr Basil Springer and developed through the partnership of the Finance Alliance for Sustainable Trade (FAST) and the Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation (CTA) ACP-EU with financial support from the Intra-ACP Agricultural Policy Programme (APP).

 It highlights the investment potential in the CARIFORUM region’s growing agribusiness sector, with increasing global demand for tubers, added value of cultivating the crop, and the governments’ efforts to promote production and value addition. CARIFORUM (Caribbean Forum of the African, Caribbean and Pacific Group of States) countries in the Caribbean comprises Antigua and Barbuda, the Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Cuba, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Grenada, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname and Trinidad and Tobago. 

The investment guide was developed to explore three different streams, the macro economic profile of the Caribbean; the sweet potato value chain; and the creation of a favourable environment for investment.
 The following are the key messages outlined in the new guide:
 1. It explores innovative financial instruments available for the sweet potato value chain in the Caribbean to mitigate risks and take advantage of the fast growing investment potential in the sector;
 2. Call for greater reliance on domestically produced fresh or processed sweet potato rather than imports;
 3. More investment in technology needed to enhance sustainability, increase productivity and boost profits in the Caribbean sweet potato sector;
 4. The sweet potato sector in the Caribbean provides many investment opportunities in boosting productivity, enhancing production processes and generating and marketing multiple products;
 5. The Sweet potatoes is a drought tolerant crop actively promoted to mitigate climate stress; 
6. With better access to finance Caribbean farmers could benefit from the growing demand for sweet potatoes in the lucrative UK, US, and EU markets;
 7. Growing the export market for sweet potatoes in the Caribbean will heavily depend on support for investment from financial institutions and the efficient management of the value chain;
 8. Access to affordable finance is the most critical constraint that inhibits the growth of the sweet potato sector in the CARIFORUM region. 
 The Guide also highlights that the Caribbean region has the right qualities to promote growth and investment in the sweet potato. These qualities include:
 a) Favourable climate for investment; 
 b) Favourable climate conditions;
 c) Import substitution in the region; 
 d) Potential Export-Ready Countries; 
 e) Sweet-potato value chain management; 
f) The sweet potato sector represents a promising business opportunity; 
 g) The sweet potato sector offers investment opportunities for the short, medium and long term; 
 h) Sweet potato as a climate stress resilient crop; and 
 i) Timely access to appropriate finances is key. 
CARIFORUM governments to reap the benefits of the growing demands in the sector, by implementing plans for diversifying the agricultural investment initiatives to provide access to finance by the farmers to improve their production capacity and acquire necessary inputs. Hence, the financial institutions will also have an opportunity to expand its services in the agri-sector to include all aspects along the sweet potato value chain (from the farms to forks).
 It is, therefore, a much-needed business innovation and creation within CARIFORUM government and financial institutions to address a smart-finance opportunity in the region. The FAST President and CEO Noemí Perez said, “This Guide provides practical information to financial services providers (FSPs) that wish to invest in the sweet potato sector in the Caribbean. FAST hopes that, with the right information, more and more FSPs can tailor their financial products and services to the growing demand in the agricultural sector.” 
The sweet potato is a drought-tolerant crop which harvest takes some five to six months, and as with most agri-sector commodity the process to secure financing delays the cycle for production which also includes export in a timely manner.
The Guide also identifies the Beauregard variety of sweet potato [orange fleshed sweet potato] as a preferred choice of consumers which is highly nutritious. 
Due to the variety together with proper agronomic practices and favourable weather and soil conditions, it highly resistant to pest and diseases and has a shorter production time of three times more harvest annually to that of other varieties [over 400 varieties of sweet potato globally]. 

The CARICOM’s Caribbean Agricultural Research and Development Institute (CARDI) has produced proper practice guidelines for sweet potato which have been used successfully in Jamaica and Saint Vincent and the Grenadines. The CTA Director Michael Hailu added, “Access to finance is one of the critical challenges that small-scale producers across the Caribbean and other regions where we work face in modernising their operations and reap greater benefit from farming. We hope the investment Guide will help in attracting badly needed finances to the regions’ promising sweet potato sector.” A noteworthy aspect of the guide is that it discusses challenges and identifies favourable conditions or potentials within the value chain. It summarises that for outstanding production and export values, technical aspect must be carefully addressed. Such was the lesson learnt from these CARIFORUM countries as the Dominican Republic, Jamaica and Saint Vincent and the Grenadines. 

However, more attention needs to focus on the management of value chains and business systems as the industry expands. It identifies additionally the need for ‘coordination of the value chain stakeholders, improvement of productivity and access to technology’ as challenges faced by the sector. Interesting Facts about Sweet Potato from the Investment Guide: 
• The leaves, shoots and root are edible
; • Sweet potato vines also provide the basis for a high-protein animal feed;
 • It has a high starch content and is well suited to processing;
 • It has become an important source of raw material for starch and starch-derived industrial products;
 • Added value includes a variety of products and ingredients made from the sweet potato root, including flour, dried chips, juice, bread, noodles, candy and pectin. 
 • New products include liquors and anthocyanin pigments from purple varieties for use in food colouring and in the cosmetics industry.
 • It is an excellent linkage with the livestock and cosmetics industries and can be another way to mitigate the risks of investments as the product portfolio diversifies. 

For more information on the sweet potato investment guide, please visit: http://www.cta.int/en/news/investing-in-caribbean-agriculture.html info@fastinternational.org 
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Please Register Now: ICTforAg 2016 – New Technology For Smallholder Farmers | ICT Works

Please Register Now: ICTforAg 2016 – New Technology For Smallholder Farmers | ICT Works | NEPAD CAADP Compendium on Agriculture in Africa | Scoop.it
Please register now for ICTforAg 2016 on June 10th, at FHI 360 in Washington, DC.
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Young farmer determined to make food security a national concern

 by Majara MolupeThursday, September 10, 2015

 

MASERU- Nthabiseng Hlalele , a young and vibrant lady, living in the small village of Masite on the outskirts of  Maseru says women should bring food security to the fore because they are the ones taking care of their families.

 

Hlalele said she ventured into farming in 2010 by helping her mother in her farming projects.

 

She said she is following her mother’s footsteps in interacting with nature in order to put bread on the table, saying her mother had influenced her discernibly on food security initiatives.

 

“My mother was nominated as the Woman of the Year in Agriculture- 2014,” explained Hlalele.

 

She reiterated that she continued working and assisting her mother with administration and mobilization of the farming projects, post harvest management and sales.

 

Inspired by her mother’s endeavors in farming, Hlalele said she pursued planting vegetables in her mother’s small back yard where she started growing high quality vegetables because she was unemployed and planted just for subsistence purposes.

 

Meanwhile, Hlalele revealed that as she enjoyed the revenues accrued from the soil, she extended her projects and grew from subsistence farming to commercial farming.

 

 She said she has found it necessary to extend her farming tentacles where she invested her time in the agriculture sector.

 

This young farmer said she honed her skills in the sector by attending training workshops, exhibitions and reading books.

 

“I learned how to do agribusiness not only because I was unemployed or for family business but because l pursued what l discovered what I loved and ran with the vision,” she explained.

 

“I worked hard and became focused on my projects,” said Hlalele.

 

She is now a young commercial farmer selling to leading retail stores and hotels in the capital Maseru.

 

Hlalele said she currently owns a greenhouse and her own piece of land, adding that she is a certified seed bean producer who has an outlet that sells agricultural inputs and feeds, named Beautiful Gardens.

 

She told this paper that her company employs both young and elderly people seasonally and that she allows schools to visit her land to have a feel for farming practices.

 

This young farmer explained that she also allows pupils from nearby schools to visit her garden so that they could see how food is produced from the land and to instill the spirit of agriculture to these pupils at an incipient stage.

 

Hlalele is leading by example the implementation of the Malabo Declaration 2014 that strongly advocates that women and youth should be engaged in food production initiatives in their respective countries.

 

She is one of the young female farmers who are enthusiastic to see Malabo Declaration being put into use and the Comprehensive Advanced Agricultural Development Programme (CAADP) practically possible in Lesotho.

 

Hlalele said she strongly believes that women have potential to change economies of their countries provided they are given space.

 

She has represented Lesotho many a times at international agricultural forums that are aimed at empowering young farmers.

 

 

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Coastweek - The most from the coast

Coastweek - The most from the coast | NEPAD CAADP Compendium on Agriculture in Africa | Scoop.it

Zambia calls on Africa to adopt climate resilient agricultural policies LUSAKA Zambia (Xinhua) --

The Zambian government has called on African countries to adopt climate resilient agricultural policies if the continent is to adapt to the effects of climate change.

While acknowledging the adverse effects of extreme climate on agricultural production on the African continent, Minister of Agriculture and Livestocks Permanent Secretary David Shamulenge said the continent holds enormous potential to improve production if the right policies were adopted and funded.

"Climate resilient agricultural policies are one such policies that will help Africa adapt to the effects of climate change.

"Climate smart agriculture will enable the continent to contribute towards mitigation efforts," the official said at the start of a regional climate smart agriculture policy dialogue meeting.

The two-day meeting organized by the Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN), a regional think-tank involved in agricultural research activities, has been called to discuss climate smart agriculture as an adaptation and mitigation strategy to a changing climate.

The Zambian government official said the changing climate change was threatening Africa’s agriculture and the livelihood of many households hence the need to adopt policies to adapt to new climate changes.

"The impact of extreme climate, whether in the form of a super El Nino or other long-term trends, affects those that engage in agriculture in the region.

"If affects the food and nutrition security of the region and ultimately affects economic growth of the region," he added.

According to a Consultative Group International Agriculture Research (CGIAR), program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security in Africa, climate change was expected to lower crop yields by at least five percent with two degrees Celsius increase in temperate, and by about 15 percent should warming increase to 2.5 degrees Celsius.

On the other hand, the southern African region witnessed poor rainfall distribution with unprecedented mix of erratic rains, abnormally high temperatures and floods have caused havoc on farming, damaging a significant amount of this year’s crop.

According to figures released during the Southern African Development Community (SADC) Summit in Botswana recently, the poor rainfall distribution has left an estimated 27.4 million people requiring food aid by the end of this year.

The meeting is discussing results of a climate smart agriculture policy scoping exercise conducted in 15 African nations by FANRPAN.

The Zambian government official added that it was time for Africa to act and come up with clear roadmap on where the continent was going with climate change and agriculture.

He has since urged African countries to make agriculture integral to all international agreements and activities ahead of the 21st Conference of the Parties (CP21) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in Paris, France in December.

Agent Chula, the chairman of FANRPAN said during the same occasion that climate smart agriculture was vital in ensuring food security for the African continent.

The meeting, he said, will come up with required interventions to enhance climate smart agriculture.

The meeting is also expected to come up with favorable policy requirements for climate smart agriculture.

"The threat of climate change has never been more urgent than today. Africa is one of the most vulnerable continents to the impacts of climate change, which have negative implications on food security and economic development," he added.
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Groundnut value chain waste to be reduced - Zambia Daily MailZambia Daily Mail

Groundnut value chain waste to be reduced - Zambia Daily MailZambia Daily Mail | NEPAD CAADP Compendium on Agriculture in Africa | Scoop.it

KABANDA CHULU, Lusaka
THE European Union in partnership with Zambia Agriculture Research Institute (ZARI) and other regional stakeholders have launched a project to reduce pre and post-harvest waste in the groundnut value chain (GnVC).
This is expected to result in increased food and nutrition security of women smallholder farmers in Zambia and Malawi.
The project dubbed as platform for African-European partnership in Agriculture and rural development (PAEPARD) through competitive research fund will be implemented over a three-year period and will offer interventions to farmers to increase incomes, food and nutrition security.
The project aims to reduce pre and post-harvest losses by reducing Aflatoxin in the GnVC for improved food and nutrition security of smallholder farmers by addressing main constraining factors of technology dissemination and adoption, knowledge and information sharing and policies.
This is according to a statement issued on the side-lines of the Food Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN) regional workshop on climate smart agriculture in Lusaka last Friday that groundnuts are a vital component in the livelihoods of rural families.
“The challenge is that the groundnuts of these farmers are prone to Aflatoxin contamination. The contamination can occur anytime from pre-harvest to post-harvest and has enormous health and economic consequences. Investing in pre and post-harvest loss research, technical advice and policy advocacy to reduce food losses can significantly increase the incomes, food and nutrition security of the farmers,” it stated.
The PAEPARD project implementation partners are ZARI, National Smallholder Farmers’ Association of Malawi, Eastern Province Farmers’ Cooperative (Zambia), FANRPAN (South Africa), University of Greenwich (UK), Department of Agricultural Research (Malawi).

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FANRPAN Regional Climate Smart Agricuture Policy Dialogue

 

By Brenda Zulu

The Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources Policy Analysis Network (FANRPAN)  regional Climate  Smart Agriculture  Policy Dialogue has commenced in Lusaka at the Intercontinental Hotel today.

 

FANRPAN is a multi-stakeholder policy research and advocacy network. The network engages with targeted constituencies at local and national levels, through its current 17 member countries in Africa. In each member country, the FANRPAN network operates through an inter-sectoral platform called a “node” comprising a diverse group of organizations including research institutes, farmer groups, government, media, parliamentarians, private sector and other civil society organizations that have a stake in Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources (FANR) policies.

 

FANRPAN operates through five thematic thrusts and these are; (i) Agriculture Input and Output Markets, (ii) Food Systems and Nutrition, (iii) Institutional Strengthening, (iv) Natural Resources and Environment and; (v) Social Protection and Livelihoods.

Within its Food Systems thematic thrust, FANRPAN implements a number of projects including aspects pertaining to Climate Smart Agriculture (CSA) and Post-Harvest Management (PHM). The programme currently covers the following countries: Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritius, South Africa, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

 

Within its Natural Resources and environment portfolio, FANRPAN implements a number of CSA projects supported by Africa Capacity Building Foundation (ACBF), Common Market for East and Southern Africa (COMESA), West and Central African Council for Agricultural Research and Development (CORAF/WECARD), International Development Research Centre (IDRC) and the Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (NORAD). The FANRPAN CSA programme currently covers the following countries: Angola, Botswana, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

 

Why the Focus on Climate Smart Agriculture

One third of the population in Southern Africa live in drought stricken areas, and over 200 million are at risk of seasonal water shortages due to climate variability. Most predictions suggest regional climate will be characterised by increased incidences of extreme weather events, including droughts and floods. Combined with increasing populations, particularly in urban areas, the Southern African Development Community Region faces a growing challenge in sustainably managing its water, food and energy demands.

 

CSA is agriculture that sustainably increases productivity, resilience (adaptation), reduces/removes greenhouse gases (mitigation), and enhances achievement of national food security and development goals. CSA promotes agricultural best practices, particularly integrated crop management, conservation agriculture, intercropping, improved seeds and fertilizer management practices, as well as supporting increased investment in agricultural research. CSA encourages the use of all available and applicable climate change solutions in a pragmatic and impact-focused manner. While resilience is key, CSA is broader and calls for more innovation and pro-activeness in changing the way farming is done in order to adapt and mitigate while sustainably increasing productivity. CSA practices propose the transformation of agricultural policies and agricultural systems to increase food productivity and enhance food security while preserving the environment and ensuring resilience to a changing climate.

 

The objective of the Regional Climate Smart Agriculture Policy Dialogue

For some years, attention has been building on the links between agriculture and climate change, with debates building momentum within the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and outside. At the Conference of the Parties (CoP17) in Durban, South Africa, Parties agreed to make agriculture an agenda item in the Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technical Advice (SBSTA), moving it from the (Working Group on Long-term Cooperative Action) LCA discussions. 

 

The significance of this move from LCA to SBSTA was that agriculture could be explored in a more politically neutral environment, by focusing on the scientific and technical aspects of the sector in relation to climate change. 

 

At CoP17 and CoP18, Parties stopped short of agreeing to create a work programme for agriculture, which would have initiated a series of Party-requested activities to further explore and exchange scientific and technical information on agriculture (e.g. technical workshops on priority topics, synthesis reports of country submissions on specific topics).  Without the decision for a work programme, Parties have continued discussions about whether to create a work programme and what the scope of a work programme would include.

 

However, progress on addressing issues relating to agriculture within the UNFCCC processes will need sustained lobbying from farmers, youth and other concerned citizens. A number of initiatives aimed at scaling up CSA and mobilizing stakeholders towards a unified position on agriculture at CoP 21 are underway. FANRPAN is actively involved in the Global Alliance for Climate Smart Agriculture (GACSA) launched during the UN Climate Summit held in 23 September 2014 in New York; and the Africa CSA Alliance launched on the 25th of June 2014 in Malabo.

 

The specific objectives of this regional policy dialogue are:

1. To solicit policy recommendations for advocating for CSA policies at  regional Level

2. To identify opportunities for scaling up CSA at national level

3. To provide a Regional perspective of the climate risks to crop production and post-harvest handling.

General overview; andSpecific focus on the Groundnut Value Chain and aflatoxin contamination

4. To chart a way forward on how best to develop synergies among different stakeholders and sectors, with the aim of scaling up and out CSA best practices and technologies and; maintaining continuous dialogue on climate risks to crop production and post-harvest handling including Aflatoxin issues

5. Concretise a unified position on African Agriculture ahead of CoP 21

 

Expected Outcomes

Coming out of the Regional Policy Dialogue, it is expected that all FANR stakeholders attending the dialogue will recognize CSA as a ‘best potential way’ to steer agricultural research and development into a new era of global efforts to advance people’s food and nutrition security. Most importantly, FANRPAN hopes to:

 

Improve understanding of the potential of CSA in addressing the challenges of food security in the face of climate changeImprove understanding of the climate risks to crop production and post-harvest handling including Aflatoxin issues.Identify policy options and innovative approaches for early action to accelerate deployment of promising CSA technologies and, practices with a particular emphasis on strengthening adaptation and application in AfricaDraw up clear recommendations for Africa’s UNFCCC Negotiators on Africa’s position on agriculture and climate change


The Regional Policy Dialogue

The Regional Policy Dialogue will take place three months before the 21st Conference of the Parties (COP21) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in Paris, France in December 2015. The Regional CSA Policy Dialogue presents a unique opportunity for African climate smart agriculture stakeholders to concretize a unified African position on agriculture ahead of CoP 21. The first two days (26-27th of August) of the dialogue will be dedicated to the CSA programme whilst day three (28th August) will be for the Post Harvest Loss Management programme.

 

On the 28th of August 2015, FANRPAN in collaboration with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the Platform for African - European Partnership in Agriculture and Rural Development (PAEPARD) will convene a side event on the Management of Climate-Related Risks to Crop Production and Post-Harvest Losses and reduction of Aflatoxin in the Groundnut Value Chain (GnVC).

The content and discussions of the regional policy dialogue will draw on research from the following CSA focused FANRPAN projects:

Strengthening Policy Advocacy and Research Capacity for Enhanced Food Security in East and Southern Africa – Funded by the Africa Capacity Building Foundation (ACBF), the project seeks to strengthen the capacity of FANRPAN to support development of FANR policies in East and Southern Africa sub-region. One of the key objectives is to enhance the capacity of FANRPAN member countries to undertake advocacy on CSA policy formulation.

Programme on Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation in the COMESA-EAC-SADC regions – Funded by the Common Market for East and Southern Africa (COMESA),  the programme aims to support the inclusion of Africa’s unified position on climate change into the post-2012 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) global agreement.  


FANRPAN Management of Climate-Related Risks to Crop Production and Post-Harvest Management Programme - Supporting Smallholder Farmers in Southern Africa to better manage Climate-related Risks to Crop Production and Post-harvest Handling is a project jointly funded by the European Union and the FAO, which spans from 2013 to 2015.  The overall objective of the project is to improve and sustain household and national food security in southern Africa through better management of climatic risks by smallholder farmers. The project was formulated to contribute to addressing the challenge of climatic hazards such as droughts, floods and cyclones, interacting with other factors such as food insecurity, and high HIV prevalence which lead to high vulnerability for millions of smallholders across southern Africa. Droughts alternate with floods and/or cyclones with devastating humanitarian effects, leading to loss of human life and assets in farming communities across the region. Climate change, with projected increases in the incidence and intensity of extreme climatic events, is likely to exacerbate existing vulnerabilities.


Stemming Aflatoxin pre- and post-harvest waste in the groundnut value chain (GnVC) in Malawi and Zambia to improve food and nutrition security in the smallholder farming families -  Funded by the PAEPARD, the project seeks to reduce pre- and post-harvest losses by reducing Aflatoxin in the Groundnut Value Chain (GnVC) for improved food and nutrition security of smallholder farmers by addressing main constraining factors of technology dissemination and adoption, knowledge and information sharing, and policies. The dialogue presents an opportunity for wide range of multi-stakeholders from the region to deliberate and amplify the voice of stakeholders in policy debates. 


Venue

Zambia is one of the three Africa CSA Alliance Fast-Track countries.  More than 70 percent of Zambia’s 13 million people rely on agriculture for their livelihoods. The Zambian Government has recognized the potential of CSA practices to improve food security and contribute to sustainable development in its Revised Sixth National Development Plan of 2013. Zambia is also one of the focal countries for the PAEPARD Competitive Research Funded project.

 

Who will attend the Regional Policy Dialogue?

The Regional Policy Dialogue participants will include representatives from:

Relevant governments ministries and departments,civil society member/non-government organizationfarmers organizationsintergovernmental organization (including UN entities)research/extension/education organizationfinancing institutionprivate sectoryouth organisations

 www.fanrpan.org

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Innovation School feeding Programme to Combat Extreme Poverty in Zanzibar

Innovation School feeding Programme to Combat Extreme Poverty in Zanzibar | NEPAD CAADP Compendium on Agriculture in Africa | Scoop.it
By Kulthum Ally Recently the Government of Zanzibar are launched a new innovation Home Grown School Feeding (HGSF) programme in collaboration with the Partnership for Child Development (PCD) and Ta...
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Namibia: Regional Seminar On Implementing Agricultural Investment Plans Using the Value Chain Approach (Page 1 of 3)

Namibia: Regional Seminar On Implementing Agricultural Investment Plans Using the Value Chain Approach (Page 1 of 3) | NEPAD CAADP Compendium on Agriculture in Africa | Scoop.it
The NEPAD Agency organised a training seminar with the theme "Implementing NAIPs using a value chain approach" in Pretoria, South Africa, from 05 to 09 May 2014. The seminar was hosted with the support of the CAADP-GIZ programme. Wallie Roux as the NAU's nominee for Namibia's CAADP Country Team attended the seminar. His participation was made possible by GIZ Namibia.
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Ghana News - Government allocates rice production targets to regions

Ghana News - Government allocates rice production targets to regions | NEPAD CAADP Compendium on Agriculture in Africa | Scoop.it
Government has allocated rice production targets to all regions in the country to become self-sufficient by 2017.
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Ghana News - €600,000 temperature controlled trucks left to rot at Agric Ministry

Ghana News - €600,000 temperature controlled trucks left to rot at Agric Ministry | NEPAD CAADP Compendium on Agriculture in Africa | Scoop.it
Two brand new temperature controlled trucks acquired by the Government with a loan from the African Development Bank have been rotting away in the scorching sun for four years now.
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AUC hosts Ministerial breakfast meeting to discuss CAADP implementation and the case of Rwanda as a CAADP success story | African Union

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The Zambian Analyst: EU Gives Africa US$126m For Fisheries

The Zambian Analyst: EU Gives Africa US$126m For Fisheries | NEPAD CAADP Compendium on Agriculture in Africa | Scoop.it
Brenda Nglazi Zulu's insight:
Good work Paul Shalala
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