Nemetics
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Nemetics
Nemetics, based on the science of complexity, is a process to understand, model and resolve 'wicked problems' by leveraging authentic constraints in various fields like engineering, social and economic movements & transformations, architecture, design of arrival cities and entrepreneurship to name a few. In order to do so Nemetics has developed a neutral language that can be fluently applied across various disciplines and subjects. The primary tool that it uses is designed on vibration and waves, vibrating strings, tubes and fields characterized by frequencies and amplitudes, which are then expressed and modeled in probabilistic terms to resolve 'wicked issues and problems' through co-created re-design.
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Leading change can happen with passionate people - Kotter applied

Leading change can happen with passionate people - Kotter applied | Nemetics | Scoop.it

Kotter's 8 step process is applied in this case study example, happening now with NetApp.

  

NetApp’s staffer and post writer, Mercedes Adams, a 3rd year Guiding Coalition program manager describes her two year experience as a part of an advisory group, in this case named the guiding coalition team, to help accelerate change leadership. I heard Rob Salmon and John Kotter speak at the ACMP 2012 Global Change conference (described in other posts on this stream) regarding their transformation project in process.

  

Note:  Sometimes this approach creates a parallel organization, which can cause problems, and sometimes it's exactly what an organization needs.  Another approach is a collateral organization (temporary, ever changing ad hoc change groups.)  We'll see how the chips fall as Dr. Kotter's advisory team approach helps NetApp over the next few years.  ~  Deb

  

Excerpts:

  

in 2009, Rob Salmon and the Field Operations leadership team decided to pair NetApp’s winning culture with an innovative framework for successful transformation that leverages the urgency and passion of employees across the business.

   

_______________________________

  

Every member selected has a sense of urgency and ‘wants to’ drive change at NetApp.

_______________________________

   

In 2009, Rob Salmon and the Field Operations leadership team decided to pair NetApp’s winning culture with an innovative framework for successful transformation via  Harvard’s Dr. John Kotter and Kotter International.

   

The Guiding Coalition (GC) brings people together from across the company who operate as a team outside the organizational hierarchy. Employees:

   

take a break from their normal day jobs creatively solve problems and drive change Include a balance of individual contributors and managers, directors and vice presidents agree to leave their titles behind when participating on the Guiding Coalition knows that they will need to do this work in addition to their day jobs collectively identify and guide key business initiatives to accelerate NetApp’s growth evangelizes their change vision and drive a sense of urgency into the organization serves for a period of one year    

The first year over 350 passionate and urgent change leaders applied.

Every member selected has a sense of urgency and ‘wants to’ drive change at NetApp.

   

In addition to the members of the Guiding Coalition, hundreds of volunteers, subject matter experts, and change leaders across Field Operations collaborate with the members to drive changes into the culture.

  

NetApp is a rapidly growing company which has thrived through major changes over its 20 year history.

  

The Executive Vice Chairman, Tom Mendoza has a video blog, Tom Talks.

  

Writer Mercedes Adams is the Guiding Coalition Strategic Program Manager at NetApp. She’s been on the Field Operations team for over seven years and advocating change leadership for the last three. Mercedes shares her ideas on a number of topics via Twitter and LinkedIn.


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Why Data Will Never Replace Thinking, DPPE, What's the Question? What's the Goal?

Why Data Will Never Replace Thinking, DPPE, What's the Question?  What's the Goal? | Nemetics | Scoop.it
The answers we get out of data will always depend on the questions we ask.

 

Useful.  It also reminded me of one of the tools we use in Whole Scale change thinking:  Data, Purpose, Plan, Evaluate, or DPPE.  Thanks to twitter follower  @resilientchange for this link this week.

 

_______________________________

"Throughout history ....science has made huge progress in precisely the areas where we can measure things — and lagged where we can't."

_______________________________



Excerpts:

 

Data-driven predictions can succeed — and they can fail. It is when we deny our role in the process that the odds of failure rise. Before we demand more of our data, we need to demand more of ourselves.

 

One key role we play in the process is choosing which data to look at. That this choice is often made for us by what happens to be easiest to measure doesn't make it any less consequential, as Samuel Arbesman writes, 

 

"Throughout history, in one field after another, science has made huge progress in precisely the areas where we can measure things — and lagged where we can't."

 

In his book,  political forecaster Nate Silver writes about a crucial element,

how we go about revising our views as new data comes in.


Silver is a big believer in the Bayesian approach to probability, in which we all have our own subjective ideas about how things are going to pan out, but follow the same straightforward rules in revising those assessments as we get new information.


It's a process that uses data to refine our thinking. But it doesn't work without some thinking first.


Read the full article here.


Perspective on change planning, facilitating, organizing, implementing or sustaining via Reveln.

 


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3 Ingredients to Becoming World Class: Will the next Toyota be Chinese, or Indian?

3 Ingredients to Becoming World Class:  Will the next Toyota be Chinese, or Indian? | Nemetics | Scoop.it

"China’s Lenovo is now the second-largest PC maker in the world and hopes to grab the top spot from Hewlett-Packard soon."

 

Read on for goood competitive change  insights here on how 2nd and 3rd tier companies in China and India are now vying for global branding recognition, and why they've got a good shot at making it happen.  

 

Excerpts:

 

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Non-branded companies earn margins of 3-8% and are at risk of being undercut by cheaper rivals. Branded firms enjoy fatter margins of 15% or more.

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Chinese and Indian companies are no longer content to do the grunt work for Western firms, for two simple reasons:

  

non-branded companies typically earn gross margins of 3-8% and are constantly at risk of being undercut by cheaper rivals.      Branded firms enjoy fatter margins (15% or more) and more loyal customers.

 

Yet becoming a global brand is exceedingly hard. ...GfK, a consumer-research company, found that only one-third of Americans were willing even to consider buying an Indian or Chinese car.

 

...How can others make the leap? “The New Emerging-Market Multinationals”, a book by Amitava Chattopadhyay, of INSEAD, and Rajeev Batra, of the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business, offers some clues.

 


____________________________________

   

...global firms need new products and processes that generate buzz.

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The article illustrates three basics:

  

First, they must exploit their two basic advantages—economies of scale and local knowledge—to expand into new markets,      Some firms use their understanding of local markets to expand globally,    Others move swiftly to exploit opportunities.

   

The research in the book offers three more ingredients to these basics:

   

1.  The first is focus: they should define a market segment in which they have a chance of becoming world-class.

    Natura Cosméticos, a Brazilian cosmetics-maker, zeroed in on the market for “natural” cosmetics with ingredients extracted from the rainforest.      Lenovo focused on computers for corporate clients before expanding into the consumer market.     

2.  The second is innovation: global firms need new products and processes that generate buzz. 

HTC produces 15-20 new mobile-phone handsets a year.     Natura releases a new product every three working days.      3.  The third ingredient is old-fashioned brand-building: Questions to decide:          Use the company’s name (as Toyota does) or another name (as Procter & Gamble does - Gillette razors to Pampers diapers)?       How to market effectively in multiple countries without budget-busting? Lenovo has hired an expensive American marketing firm, but saves money by doing most of its advertising work in Bangalore.

 

  

Read the full article here.

 

NOTE: Do you need perspective on change planning, facilitating, organizing, implementing or sustaining especially when dealing with demanding deadlines and short staffing?

 

You can contact Deb Nystrom here to find out more, without obligation.


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15 Of The Sharpest Up And Coming CEOs In Silicon Valley

15 Of The Sharpest Up And Coming CEOs In Silicon Valley | Nemetics | Scoop.it

Here's the Tech CEO best of the best list via Business Insider. Tech startups CEOs give a great view of what's next.

 

Here's two from the full list that were quite fetching in ingenuity and business style.  It's also an easy to browse, via click, article. ~  Deb

 

Excerpts:

 

Jamie Wong speaks multiple languages and has spent her life traveling the world. Now she's building a startup that makes it much easier for everyone to do the same.]

 

Vayable basically shortens the process of planning a vacation from 30 hours down to about 5 minutes. It makes it easy to plan "experiences," like touring the Louvre with a French student instead of riding a tour bus around town.

 

Patrick Collison's Stripe has become the go-to provider for accepting payments online. It makes it dead simple to add a way to pay for things on just about any app.

 

That's great for other founders, because payments are typically the most tricky part of building an application, and can take months to finally get off the ground. With Stripe, it's just a few lines of code.


Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/25-hot-ceos-of-silicon-valley-startups-you-cant-afford-to-ignore-2012-8?op=1#ixzz258nSrsMH


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Cautionary News: Bangladesh cancels licences of 6000 charities - AsiaOne

Cautionary News: Bangladesh cancels licences of 6000 charities - AsiaOne | Nemetics | Scoop.it

"Bangladesh cancels licences of 6000 charities" ~ Sep 11, 2012

 

On a day that the USA remembers terrorist acts, it's also useful to also remember what is going on in the world in some of our most impoverished areas of the world, where non-profits, NGOs hope to make a difference.

 

According to this post, thousands of charities are being shut down in Bangladesh over the past 3 years, attributed to power moves.  (See the Peter Drucker "There's no such thing as leadership" article for how effective that really is, long term.)

 

Excerpt:

 

Bangladesh has revoked licences for more than 6,000 charities over the last three years, an official said Tuesday, in a policy that critics slammed as a government attempt to extend its powers.

 

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"The government increasingly acts as though it is interested in controlling the NGO sector to a minute level detail, which will only stifle civil society activity."

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Masud Rana, spokesman for the social services department, said the licences for non-government organisations (NGOs) were withdrawn after charities were found to have collapsed or have changed their area of work.

 

"Most of these NGOs were sitting idle doing nothing or doing things other than they were permitted," Rana told AFP.

 

But the New York-based Human Rights Watch (HRW) group said the closures were a deliberate move by Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina's government.

 

"This is just a smoke screen to exert political control over civil society," said Brad Adams, Asia director at the HRW.

 

"The government increasingly acts as though it is interested in controlling the NGO sector to a minute level detail, which will only stifle civil society activity."

 

Read the full article here.


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Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 14, 2012 11:02 AM
This is a very terrible act to cancel all these charitable institutions. Politics is in the air again, controlling the lives of people. It is bad enough that we have war in these districts, but what is worst is the fact that they all seem not to care for the those who have least in life.
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9 qualities to Build an Agile Leader's Toolkit - Adapt to Sustain

9 qualities to Build an Agile Leader's Toolkit - Adapt to Sustain | Nemetics | Scoop.it

"Nine (9) agile leader qualities are listed and explained as a leader / culture toolkit for sustainable leadership practices as well as a checklist."

 

Along with Drucker's "there's no such thing as leadership" article that is getting some attention, this list is also useful for followers, staffers and for examining culture and values.  In my own experience with leader competencies, flexibility and adaptability is key to being ABLE to change, the core of sustainability. ~ Deb

 

Excerpts:

 

Elaine Rumboll suggests:

 

Adaptability Back Up Curiosity Diversity Ease of Access Foresight Grace in Failure Hubs Inclusiveness

 

The first in the list, Adaptability (Flexibility) is defined to:

 

be ready to change our plans when they are not working the way we expected create alternatives to be ready to change course mid direction build a healthy robustness around how we are going to react [let go of] things remaining stable

 

Read the full article here.

 

Read further on in this newletter about dealing with a VUCA world, once that is Volatile, Uncertain, Complex and Ambiguous


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Top 10 Competencies for Change Leaders - Gail's list

Top 10 Competencies for Change Leaders - Gail's list | Nemetics | Scoop.it

"Change leader competencies that also include mindsets. All can be developed."

 

This is a handy list worth reviewing from colleague Gail Severini. There's more to come, including a top-ten competencies for change agents those who are the focus of the change.  ~  Deb

 

Excerpts:


Change Leaders' Competencies include:


1.  Determination and discipline - The leader …“Has a profound resolve toward the specific shifts the organization has identified as essential for its future success,...” And, has the personal discipline to ...ake difficult and challenging actions.

 

2.  Self-Knowledge and mindfulness - ...calm in the midst of high-stress, dynamic change. The ability to concentrate and be attentive to other people and concepts...are intricately connected.


6.  Integrative thinking - Once we accept that transformational change presents enormous ambiguity it becomes obvious that the ability “to hold two conflicting ideas in constructive tension”.


7.  Culture awareness - An understanding of the organization’s current and desired cultures [and] plans for making the shift.


10.  Make meaning - Making the change relevant to every resource who has to make the transition --the  unusual capability to put yourself in someone else’s shoes, to ...help them ...navigate their way through it. 

 

Read the full post here.


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No More Waiting Room? Change Health Care is Implementing, as Learned From Toyota

No More Waiting Room?  Change Health Care is Implementing, as Learned From Toyota | Nemetics | Scoop.it

"Eliminating waiting rooms?  Medical Assistants that act as project managers for physicians?  The Toyota method reaches healthcare for increasing efficiency and reducing cost."

 

New healthcare efficiencies were featured in a special report on PBS this week.  Cleveland Clinic is shown eliminating waiting rooms.  


Virgina Mason is featured highligting the "flow director" status of medical assistants.  A crisis drove change at Virgina Mason, which brings up the idea of danger:  crises + opportunity.  How they fared:

 

 

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For... routine or uncomplicated back pain, Mecklenburg offered a surprising conclusion...“most of our care process was no help at all.”

 

____________________

 

 

Excerpted:

 

A crisis drove an innovative breakthrough at Virginia Mason Medical Center. Robert Mecklenburg, MD, was chief of medicine at the hospital in 2004 when the insurance company Aetna threatened to exclude Mecklenburg’s healthcare organization from an elite network.


Aetna was in a powerful position as a purchaser of care for such major companies in the Greater Seattle area as Starbucks, Costco, and Alaska Airlines, among others.


At Virginia Mason, the patient was at the top of the pyramid that embodied...its vision to transform health care. But ...employers paid the bills. ...Mecklenburg realized that neither he nor his physician colleagues had ever really considered the companies paying the bills as customers.


Mecklenburg invited Starbucks and Aetna to join with Virginia Mason in forming a marketplace collaborative to identify and solve the quality and costs issues around the treatment of routine or uncomplicated back pain.

 

Mecklenburg found that money and time were being wasted on expensive visits with primary care physicians and specialists that added little relief to the patients’ conditions.

  

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Mecklenburg found money and time were being wasted on expensive visits with ...physicians and specialists that added little relief to the patients’ conditions.

____________________


   

Mecklenburg offered a surprising conclusion...“The value stream showed that most of our care process was no help at all.”

  

A Virginia Mason marketplace collaborative delivered the following benefits.

 

Increased patient capacity. By reducing the number of patients who obtained procedures and tests unnecessarily    Improved treatment pathways for other health conditions including migraine headaches; breast nodules; shoulder, knee, and hip pain; acid reflux; and cardiac disease.     Evidence-based scheduling of expensive imaging tests. Using a Toyota principle called “mistake proofing” patients check boxes on a questionnaire to determine their need for MRIs and other imaging tests.

 

Read the full article here.

 

Photo credit:  frances1972 (Waiting Room) on Flickr.com

 

Excerpt is from Pursuing the Triple Aim: Seven Innovators Show the Way to Better Care, Better Health and Lower Costs by Maureen Bisognano and Charles Kenney. Copyright (c) 2012 by John Wiley & Sons Inc.


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Leadership Challenges: Embrace paradoxes to move forward

Leadership Challenges: Embrace paradoxes to move forward | Nemetics | Scoop.it

"This provocative post highlights current business paradoxes challenging leaders:  change or remain stable, complexity versus simplicity, growth and sustainability and more."

 

After seeing evidence of our increasingly VUCA world, one that is growing in its Volatile, Uncertain, Complex and Ambiguous characteristics, this useful list of paradoxes resonates.  Does it resonate to your experience?

 

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Leaders must find ways to deal with this complexity and embrace and manage it to achieve simplicity.

___________________________

   

 

Excerpted:

  

Paradox 1: growth versus sustainability

Growth as it is currently defined tends to result in an unquestioned and unchecked consumption of resources. Sustainability considerations are generally considered to put a major strain on growth ambitions.

 

The way forward is innovation, but another paradox present itself:

  

Paradox 2: innovating versus operating

Innovation is increasingly about service, process, business model and social innovation.

However, focusing on innovation does not mean ignoring operations. The trick is that what allows operations to thrive can seriously get in the way of innovation and vice versa.

  

Paradox 3:  change versus continuity

If you try to innovate too many things at once you will end up with chaos, if you do not change at all your organisation will decline. What is the right balance?

  

Paradox 4: collaboration versus competition

Business is inherently competitive yet today, collaboration is common, with most companies having collaborated with their suppliers and their customers. Leading companies are promoting collaboration through crowdsourcing or with competitors.

  

Paradox 5: complexity versus simplicity

Demands on leaders result in increasing levels of complexity, arising from the number of possible, unpredictable interactions between collaborate, compete; change, remain stable; innovation or operational excellence; growth or sustainability. Leaders must find ways to deal with this complexity and embrace and manage it to achieve simplicity.

  

Paradox 6: Heart versus mind

Decisions need to be made in the face of incomplete analysis, unpredictable outcomes and changing circumstances. The foundations for analysis and factual arguments differ from emotional and visionary engagement; people who excel at one are not necessarily particularly good at the other and yet both are needed.

  

Read the full article by Dr Bettina von Stamm here.


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