nature in the city
49 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Mafi Vitpal
Scoop.it!

Interview : Vincent Callebaut imagine Paris en 2050

Interview : Vincent Callebaut imagine Paris en 2050 | nature in the city | Scoop.it
A quoi pourrait ressembler Paris en 2050 ? Voilà un question qui suscite beaucoup d'interrogation. Mais, en réalité il ne s'agit pas que d'une question sur Paris, mais bel et bien d'une question planétaire sur le devenir de nos villes. Smart City
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mafi Vitpal from Climate - Water - Ecology - People and Sustainability post Rio+20
Scoop.it!

Sri Lankan apartment block to be world's tallest vertical garden

Sri Lankan apartment block to be world's tallest vertical garden | nature in the city | Scoop.it

Via Alexandre Pépin
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mafi Vitpal from nature in the city
Scoop.it!

Everything You Need to Know About Recycling

Everything You Need to Know About Recycling | nature in the city | Scoop.it
Did you know that recycling one aluminum can saves enough energy to power a TV for 3 hours? Or that it takes 550 years for a diaper to decompose? Which is pretty bad since Americans throw away 18 billion diapers a year!

Via Dirty Work Services, Milos Crafts, Mafi Vitpal
more...
Dirty Work Services's curator insight, July 19, 2013 11:45 PM

Great resource with everything you need to know about recycling. 

Scooped by Mafi Vitpal
Scoop.it!

Ecuador anuncia que los recursos del Yasuní ITT serán explotados

Ecuador anuncia que los recursos del Yasuní ITT serán explotados | nature in the city | Scoop.it
El anuncio lo hizo hace pocos minutos el presidente Correa, mediante una cadena de televisión.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mafi Vitpal
Scoop.it!

Villes américaines du XXI e siècle : réalités et représentations ... - Fabula

Villes américaines du XXI e siècle : réalités et représentations ...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mafi Vitpal from Ecology news, upcycling & recycling
Scoop.it!

Everything You Need to Know About Recycling

Everything You Need to Know About Recycling | nature in the city | Scoop.it
Did you know that recycling one aluminum can saves enough energy to power a TV for 3 hours? Or that it takes 550 years for a diaper to decompose? Which is pretty bad since Americans throw away 18 billion diapers a year!

Via Dirty Work Services, Milos Crafts
more...
Dirty Work Services's curator insight, July 19, 2013 11:45 PM

Great resource with everything you need to know about recycling. 

Rescooped by Mafi Vitpal from green streets
Scoop.it!

Creating a Sustainable Urban Landscape: Manama Urban Oasis by Aétrangère

Creating a Sustainable Urban Landscape: Manama Urban Oasis by Aétrangère | nature in the city | Scoop.it

Bab Al Bahrain Urban Oasis explores the value of the cultural and natural landscape inheritance as a design opportunity to address climate issues in public space, while catalyzing the urban potential of the site in the emerging new city urbanity.


Urban Oasis is considered to be the most important public space of Manama, embodying its dynamic character and showcasing its new sustainable identity.

An urban makeover is taking place at Bahrain and its capital, Manama. The city is evolving in the global economy as the financial hub of the Middle East, and witnessing a dramatic transformation of the urban fabric.

Urban Oasis represents its strategic position and historical importance, as an opportunity to create a lively metropolitan interface, able to link and gather both the historic urban fabric and the new modern city front.


The project is composed of layers evolving in a symbiotic and sustainable way. Responding to the climate, an urban canopy will provide shade, shelter, and comfort to the pedestrian areas below, offering an oasis from the stress of urban conditions. The public ground level, with its open spaces, water landscaping and main public pedestrian and car access, will host the principal cultural and urban facilities. 

The passively cooled terrace will provide an innovative urban place, lend a sense of fluidity to the open space and allow for great views of the waterfront, while a footbridge will create a continuous pedestrian pathway to the sea. Uses here would include cafes, small retail frontage, information points and restaurants.


Among the green areas proposed to reduce the ambient temperature while creating the new microclimate, ware numerous green features: Seven circular sunken gardens which will be showcased as world vegetal biomes, which will enhance local and foreign biodiversity. Those gardens of scents will be like glazed clusters, such a protected special areas...


Learn more about the project and see more photos and diagrams at the article link.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
Mário Carmo's curator insight, January 28, 2015 10:20 AM

The URBAN OASIS World Biomes will show the connection between the continents, welcoming plants from the Arabic world as well as others from the five continents at the same latitude as Bahrain. The biomes have a didactic vocation, like open books offering a world wide botanic panorama. To reduce water consumption, the gardens will filter a part of the waste water produced by the cultural facilities using purifying natural plants. The deep courtyard biomes will be irrigated with this recycled water to create the humid and dry landscapes and encourage biodiversity.

Scooped by Mafi Vitpal
Scoop.it!

Cultivating Public Spaces for Urban Farming in San Francisco — City Farmer News

Cultivating Public Spaces for Urban Farming in San Francisco — City Farmer News | nature in the city | Scoop.it
Cultivating Public Spaces for Urban Farming in San Francisco: College Hill Reservoir. The p...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mafi Vitpal from Urban ecology
Scoop.it!

6,000 lbs of food on 1/10th acre - Urban Farm - Urban Homestead - Growing Your Own Food

Over 6,000 pounds of food per year, on 1/10 acre located just 15 minutes from downtown Los Angeles. The Dervaes family grows over 400 species of plants, 4,30...

Via Daniel Moura
more...
Daniel Moura's curator insight, February 20, 2013 5:44 AM

"Path to Freedom" homestead: living urban doesn't mean living unnaturaly. A great example of urban farm and how you can reduce your ecological footprint

Suzette Jackson's curator insight, September 10, 2014 7:24 PM

the urban homestead, see how this family grows more than enough food to live off and produce for restaurants

Rescooped by Mafi Vitpal from Organic Farming
Scoop.it!

IPS – Urban Farming Takes Root in Brazil’s Favelas | Inter Press Service

IPS – Urban Farming Takes Root in Brazil’s Favelas | Inter Press Service | nature in the city | Scoop.it

Urban Farming Takes Root in Brazil’s Favelas - Women in one of the poorest neighbourhoods of this city 40 km north of Rio de Janeiro no longer have to spend money on vegetables, because they have learned to grow their own, as organic urban..gardening takes off in Brazil.

Cooperative member Rosinéia Soares displays the aubergines growing in her garden in Parque Genesiano da Luz. Credit: Fabiana Frayssinet/IPS

The land here is not fertile, like it is in the hilly region of the state of Rio de Janeiro that supplies the city’s markets. And the climate is sometimes too hot for vegetables to grow without stress or pests.

But in the poor neighbourhood of Parque Genesiano da Luz in the city of Nova Iguaçu, local women can now proudly say they eat what they themselves have grown.

The women sell the rest of what they produce – 70 percent – through the Univerde cooperative they set up, which comprises 22 families who put five percent of what they earn back in, to run the cooperative.

Production is carried out on an individual basis, but everything else, including the sales of produce, is done collectively.

“It’s wonderful to see what you grow in the garden, bring everything home fresh, and give your children such healthy food,” Joyce da Silva, one of the members of the cooperative, told IPS. “So much so that when the low-production season arrives, we don’t even buy outside, because now we know that conventional products have a lot of poison. And I don’t want to eat that anymore.”

Related IPS ArticlesWomen in Brazil Turn to Eco-Friendly Farming in Wake of StormsUrban Gardening Benefits Pocketbooks and Health in GuatemalaUrban Farming Takes Root in EuropeCUBA: Sustainable Agriculture Moves to the SuburbsBRAZIL: Agricultural School Cultivates Pride in Family Farming – 2009


The gardens, which are each about 1,000 square metres in size, are located on what once were empty lots. Below them lie pipelines of the state oil company, Petrobras, which financed the project when it got under way in 2007.

When the financing dried up, many of the more than 50 families taking part at the time dropped out, due to a lack of resources.

But a group of women decided to continue, against all odds: they didn’t have funds, tools, or transportation to haul seeds and seedlings or take their products to the street markets to sell them.

But they were determined not to give up the independence they had achieved.

“Before getting involved in the cooperative, I only looked after my home,” da Silva said. “But afterwards, I gained economic independence. Another kind of independence is the health I achieved for my family. And also the improved living conditions. Things at home improved in general.”

The Urban Agriculture Programme, which now provides the women with technical assistance, was created in 1999, and was expanded into peri-urban areas in 2011 by AS-PTA, a non-governmental organisation that promotes urban family gardening and agroecology.

This programme is aimed at boosting the incomes of families in peri-urban areas – poor neighbourhoods on the outskirts of the cities of Rio de Janeiro, Queimados and Magé, where it benefits a total of 650 people.

The urban farmers do not use chemicals. Both the fertilisers and pesticides they use are homemade and non-toxic.

The majority of the food consumed in the city comes from far away, which means prices are driven up by transport costs, Marcio Mattos de Mendonça, the coordinator of the Urban Agriculture Programme, told IPS.

“The people who live in these communities need food from nearby areas,” he said. “Fresh vegetables are often left off the menu, and unhealthy kinds of food are given priority.”

In line with the global demographic trend, Brazil’s population of more than 192 million people is increasingly urban.

In 2000, 81 percent of Brazilians lived in urban areas, and 10 years later the proportion has risen to over 84 percent, according to the 2010 census.

But the growing urbanisation has not snuffed out the vocation for farming passed down through the generations, Mendonça said. In many poor urban areas like the favelas or shantytowns lining the hills of Rio de Janeiro, people have kept alive the custom of growing vegetables and medicinal herbs, and raising small animals like pigs, goats or barnyard fowl.

Aldeni Fausto, who always grew vegetables in her yard, inherited that practice which has been kept alive by migrants from rural areas and which she is now successfully reproducing within the city limits.

“Living in nature is what I like the most,” she said. “The pleasure of planting, harvesting and feeding ourselves, reviving our family’s roots and traditions and teaching them to our children; that is so important, so we don’t forget our history.”

Fausto, the president of the Univerde cooperative, said the distancing of rural migrants from their land led to “an increase in diseases, an imbalance in nature, and financial problems, because these people have nothing to eat and no interest in producing food.”

But “if people planted a little bit in every corner, they wouldn’t suffer from a lack of food,” she said.

Da Silva looks at it from another angle. “I never imagined producing food in the middle of the city. This area didn’t even have a market. And sometimes we couldn’t even afford to go somewhere else to buy things,” she said.

The visit to the cooperative was one of the field trips organised by World Nutrition Rio 2012, an international nutrition congress organised in Rio de Janeiro Apr. 27-30 by the World Public Health Nutrition Association and the Brazilian Association of Collective Health.

Among other issues, the congress discussed healthy eating habits, the planet’s resources, and the need to recognise and support traditional food systems – three core concepts that underlie the activities of the Univerde cooperative.

Da Silva said her family had various health-related problems linked to eating habits that she now understands were harmful.

Her daughter, for example, had anaemia. “Even though she is dark-skinned like I am, she looked sort of yellowish and was very weak. But with this food, she is now in good health, her skin shines, and her lips and gums are nice and red; this was the best thing about it, for me,” da Silva said.

Fausto also noticed improvements in her family’s quality of life. “Although I don’t look like it, I used to be fat. I have seen changes in my body, in my health, in my children’s diet. My mind now is more at ease, and I have found an equilibrium,” she said, pointing out that she is now free of obesity-related health problems like back pain and hypertension.

But the route these women chose is not an easy one. Without strong support, like the funding they received at first, the sustainability of the cooperative is always an issue of concern.

Of the more than 50 plots of land available for urban farming in Nova Iguaçu, only 22 are currently in use, said one of the visitors from the congress, Angélica Siqueira, a student in her final year of coursework for a degree in nutrition at the alternative economy centre of the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul.

“There is still a prejudice that the countryside is poor,” Siqueira told IPS. Her team is attempting to apply urban and peri-urban farming techniques in poor neighbourhoods in her state, in southern Brazil, through the Technological Incubator of Popular Cooperatives.

The hope of the cooperative members is that now they have official certification, they will be able to sell their produce to the federal government’s school meals programme, which stimulates purchases by public schools of food produced by family farmers.

“Before, we didn’t even know how to run a company, and now we administer our own cooperative,” said Fausto, a true convert to urban gardening. “It’s therapy. One little plant gives you back gratitude and love.”

 


Via Giri Kumar
more...
Rescooped by Mafi Vitpal from Yellow Boat Social Entrepreneurism
Scoop.it!

The Role of Plants and Landscapes in Human Health and Well-Being | Cornell Garden-Based Learning

The Role of Plants and Landscapes in Human Health and Well-Being | Cornell Garden-Based Learning | nature in the city | Scoop.it

Here are some useful links in pursuing an understanding of the role of plants and landscapes in human health and well-being:

Human Issues in Horticulture – A seminal and important, groundbreaking paper on Human Issues in Horticulture, written by Diane Relf in 1992. This is a piece that changed the way that many view horticulture, and started a new wave of emphasis on plants and human well-being in horticultural research.

Landscape and Human Health Laboratory – A multidisciplinary research laboratory based at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign dedicated to studying the connection between greenery and human health.  Recent findings include improved concentration for children with attention deficit disorders after taking a walk in the park and lower crime rates in inner-city neighborhoods with greenery.

Children & Nature Network – Chaired by Richard Louv, author of Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children From Nature-Deficit Disorder, C&NN offers a link between researchers, educators, and organizations dedicated to children’s health and well-being.

Therapeutic Landscapes Resource Center – Excellent source of information in healing benefits of landscapes.

Human Dimensions of Urban Forestry and Urban Greening – Research from the University of Washington focusing on  peoples’ perceptions and behaviors regarding nature in cities.

Meristem Restorative Gardens for Healthcare Environments and The Restorative Commons Initiative – A non-profit educational organization based in New York City, Meristem works to promote nature’s role in the improvement of human health and well-being.

Human Flower Project – An international newsgroup, photo album, and discussion of how people live through flowers. Reports on art, medicine, society, politics, religion, and commerce.

Plants for People – An international initiative that supports and promotes research findings on the benefits of plants in an indoor working environment.

Green Plants for Green Buildings – A national campaign working to inform building industry professionals and the public about the benefits of interior plants.

http://blogs.cornell.edu/garden/grow-your-program/research-that-supports-our-work/the-role-of-plants-and-landscapes-in-human-health-and-well-being/


Via Rick Passo
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mafi Vitpal
Scoop.it!

"Distance learning MSc in Green Economy" (Bournemouth University)

It is now possible to take the units of this course as individual continuing professional development units, which means you can register for one unit at a time, rather than a full award. You can complete to full masters via this flexible delivery. For more information, please contact our askBU Enquiry Service .

 

Key features of the course

 

A unique course that is the only course of its kind in the worldCombine your studies with employment, and there is scope to undertake a professional placement in a workplace as part of the courseHighly inter-disciplinary, drawing from ecology, geography, social science, psychology and technology, among other areas

 

What will I study?

 

The development of a green economy, or an economy that is environmentally sustainable, has become a political and socio-economic imperative. Key drivers include the need to reduce carbon emissions to minimise the risk of climate change, overexploitation of resources and widespread environmental degradation, which is eroding the natural capital on which human wellbeing depends. The transition to a green economy represents a substantial challenge to society, particularly in the current era of rapid environmental and socio-economic change.

This green economy course seeks to provide the scientific understanding on which the transition to a green economy can be based, including the principles of environmental sustainability and the societal responses required to implement these in practice.

How will I study?

In keeping with the ethos of the course, it is delivered via distance learning to minimise its environmental impact. The course can be studied from anywhere in the world, supported by a high quality virtual learning environment. You will be supported by electronic communication with staff and researchers at BU, and will also interact with other students as members of a virtual learning community.

The course includes the option to undertake either a research project, or an extended professional placement involving implementation of a practical project in a workplace environment.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mafi Vitpal
Scoop.it!

Ecuador: First country to give Constitutional Rights to Nature

Ecuador: First country to give Constitutional Rights to Nature | nature in the city | Scoop.it

Towards the difference: Alausi-Ecuador

Mafi Vitpal's insight:

Read more in few seconds:

Chapter 7 page 31 Art. 71-74

http://www.utelvt.edu.ec/NuevaConstitucion.pdf

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mafi Vitpal
Scoop.it!

1 Presentacion - PNBV 2013-2013

1 Presentación - PNBV 2013-2013
Mafi Vitpal's insight:

The National Plan : "Buen Vivir" ; revolutionary way to govern

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mafi Vitpal
Scoop.it!

Play>urban » Public space / Espace public

Play>urban » Public space / Espace public | nature in the city | Scoop.it
How the notion of public space makes sense nowadays in the context of globalized cities ? Comment la notion d'espace public fait-elle sens aujourd'hui dans le contexte des villes mondialisées ? The notion of public space is ...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mafi Vitpal from Ecology news, upcycling & recycling
Scoop.it!

How Eco-Friendly is Bamboo Fabric, Really? | Ecouterre

How Eco-Friendly is Bamboo Fabric, Really? | Ecouterre | nature in the city | Scoop.it

Bamboo is the fastest-growing woody plant in the world, capable of growing up to four feet a day. Most of it is grown organically (though very little is certified organic), and in most locations requires no irrigation or fertilizers. There are some concerns about its use, namely depleting natural bamboo habitats (for pandas) and clearing forests for bamboo plantations. But for the most part, the growing of bamboo can be considered sustainable. Fabric made from bamboo, however, is more controversial..


Via Milos Crafts
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mafi Vitpal from Environment & Ecology
Scoop.it!

Can Architects Solve Our Cities’ Pollution Problems?

Can Architects Solve Our Cities’ Pollution Problems? | nature in the city | Scoop.it

As populations continue to move to urban areas, architects must address how their designs will impact the cities they are trying to improve— and those inhabitants whose access to clean air is determined by their proposals. How can architects best use design to repair the health of our cities?

 

Visit the article link for project links and an overview of some of the innovative ways architecture addresses climate change, air quality, emissions and is rethinking our cities through design, technology and new approaches to sustainable urbanism...


Via Lauren Moss, Ceci Ramirez
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mafi Vitpal
Scoop.it!

Cultivating Public Spaces for Urban Farming | SPUR - San Francisco Planning + Urban Research Association

Cultivating Public Spaces for Urban Farming | SPUR - San Francisco Planning + Urban Research Association | nature in the city | Scoop.it
@SFWater Cultivating Public Spaces 4 Urban Farming w/ @SFUnified, @SFgreenschools, @SPUR_Urbanist + other great orgs- http://t.co/9zmiav1X...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mafi Vitpal from Urban ecology
Scoop.it!

America's "greenest street" provides a blueprint for sustainable urban development

America's "greenest street" provides a blueprint for sustainable urban development | nature in the city | Scoop.it

A streetscape that includes natural landscaping, bicycle lanes, wind powered lighting, storm water diversion for irrigation, drought-resistant native plants and innovative “smog-eating” concrete has earned Cermak road in Chicago the title of “greenest Street in America” according to the Chicago Department of Transport (CDOT).

 

Opened in October 2012, the first phase two mile stretch is part of the Blue Island/Cermak Sustainable Streetscape project which was introduced in 2009 with the aim of reducing overall energy usage by 42 percent.


Via Lauren Moss, Daniel Moura
more...
Mercor's curator insight, February 4, 2013 6:42 AM

Scooped by Lauren Moss

Suzette Jackson's curator insight, September 10, 2014 6:22 PM

how does your street rate? compare it to the 'greenest street in America?

Rescooped by Mafi Vitpal from Urban ecology
Scoop.it!

Can Glowing Trees One Day Replace Electric Streetlights?

Can Glowing Trees One Day Replace Electric Streetlights? | nature in the city | Scoop.it

Engineering nature to sustain our needs is exactly what the Glowing Plant Project aims to do in efforts to engineer “a glow-in-the-dark plant using synthetic biology techniques that could possibly replace traditional lighting”.

Bioluminescence – the production and emission of light by a living organism – is the overarching concept of the Glowing Plant Project, and the approach can be divided into three basic steps: design, print and transform.

Visit the article link to learn more about this new technology...


Via Lauren Moss, Daniel Moura
more...
Norm Miller's curator insight, May 20, 2013 4:01 PM

Very cool idea.  Maybe genetically modified food is not as cool, but this seems harmless enough, of course until it eats your cat. :-)

 

bancoideas's curator insight, May 23, 2013 10:58 AM

Árboles bioluminiscentes en reemplazo del alumbrado público, una idea sobrecogedora ¿no?

Scooped by Mafi Vitpal
Scoop.it!

When agriculture meets the city… - Metropolitics

When agriculture meets the city… - Metropolitics | nature in the city | Scoop.it
In this article, André Torre and Lise Bourdeau-Lepage consider the role of nature in the city through the prism of urban agriculture. They defend
more...
No comment yet.